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Mike Matson
Jul. 28, 2011, 05:45 PM
I'm glad she did this. Thank you Courtney.

http://youtu.be/awJDYBhBPzk

catosis
Jul. 28, 2011, 07:41 PM
My question is why did it take a BNT getting hurt to actually start a movement to encourage people to wear helmets while riding? Doctors and most instructors have known for years that it is stupid not to wear a helmet any time you are mounted. I volunteer at a therapeutic learning center and see TBI patients all the time, and I have to say that my head is worth a lot more than having a nice hair day or dressage tradition. I don't mean to start a helmet vs. no helmet debate, but come on people, if you won't wear a helmet for your own self edification, at least do it for the people who love you and do not what to see you going through what CKD has been through.

Mike Matson
Jul. 28, 2011, 08:04 PM
Judging from the lack of responses to the video, I think CotHers were comfortable reading about Courtney but are not comfortable having to face the reality of what happens when you do have a brain injury.

It took courage and grace to produce this video.

happymom
Jul. 28, 2011, 08:18 PM
That is correct. It's hard to comprehend the difficulty she has gone through.

She's not only a great rider, she's a great woman.
She's much more than I ever could hope to be.

reefy!
Jul. 28, 2011, 08:21 PM
It was startling.....but what a great message and great delivery.

I sent it to my friend who will not wear a helmet. Maybe it will have an impact.

Bogey2
Jul. 28, 2011, 08:35 PM
It took courage and grace to produce this video.

Amen, and bless you Courtney!!

luv2ride113
Jul. 28, 2011, 08:37 PM
I was moved to tears. I saw Courtney ride in Las Vegas and became a fan. I hadn't realized the severity of her brain injury until I saw the video. It is unfortunate that an accident such as hers has thrust the importance of wearing a helmet each and every time you ride into the spotlight. It must have taken tremendous courage to make that video. Courtney is a shining star and an inspiration.

Creaghgal
Jul. 28, 2011, 08:42 PM
& it sheds a whole new light on the L’Apogée® Saddlery advertisement.... Stunning photo but something is missing now.

WW_Queen
Jul. 28, 2011, 09:09 PM
My question is why did it take a BNT getting hurt to actually start a movement to encourage people to wear helmets while riding?

Sadly, most people seem to believe it will NEVER happen to them, that only a certain "type" of rider/discipline/whatever has a fall that could cause serious long-term damage.

I have seen first-hand how TBI's can affect people, regardless of how the accident occurred. (My grandmother had to live in a long-term care home before she passed away.) One young man was in his late 20's, and had been living there since he was in his mid-teens and it was a dirt bike accident. He will never leave the hospital; same with many others there. The strength it takes for TBI survivors is remarkable when you see it up close, but also tragic that others don't take doctors advice (common sense?) to protect themselves.

Courtney is a hero.

IdahoRider
Jul. 28, 2011, 09:59 PM
Wow. All I can say is that she has approached her recovery with the same strength and tenacity that got her to the top of her sport.
Sheilah

3Spots
Jul. 28, 2011, 10:36 PM
Thanks for posting! I think it especially meaningful that she made it clear her horse wasn't being naughty, just a trip and fall. My worst fall was standing still, bareback 200 feet from my stall. I did have a helmet.

dwblover
Jul. 28, 2011, 10:48 PM
I am so proud of Courtney for turning this accident into a quest to help and protect others. She is an inspiration to us all, thank you Courtney!!!

clm08
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:01 PM
Thanks for posting the video. I am also deeply moved by her strength and courage. Great role model.

mickeydoodle
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:13 PM
As a doc who deals with traumatic brain injuries (improvable and not improvable) I can relate t0 this and all videos about this injury. Some injuries are static, some dynamic, all require individual assessment and care, and long term follow up.

Beverley
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:18 PM
That's a gold medal performance.

seabreeze
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:21 PM
This was very moving. It was difficult for me to watch. I can only imagine how difficult it might be for Courtney to watch herself.

I always wear a helmet, but I don't preach at those who don't. Hopefully Courtney's message will preach the message in its own unique way.

J-Lu
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:36 PM
Judging from the lack of responses to the video, I think CotHers were comfortable reading about Courtney but are not comfortable having to face the reality of what happens when you do have a brain injury.

It took courage and grace to produce this video.

I disagree. There was only 2 hours between this and your first post.

I think COTHers and non-COTHers alike have faced the reality of what happens with traumatic brain injury since Day 1 of Courtney's accident.

One doesn't have to post on COTH to appreciate Courtney's message and her fiercely determined self.

grayarabpony
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:58 PM
Kudos to her for making this video. So many people think they will never get hurt and I hope they listen to her message.

Mike Matson
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:13 AM
I disagree. There was only 2 hours between this and your first post.

I think COTHers and non-COTHers alike have faced the reality of what happens with traumatic brain injury since Day 1 of Courtney's accident.

One doesn't have to post on COTH to appreciate Courtney's message and her fiercely determined self.

2 hours. 90 views. No posts. Thus my post.

Since that post, responses.

There is a different impression between reading a blog and seeing the person. I think this video sends a strong message and I thank Courtney for doing it.

selah
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:38 AM
I disagree. There was only 2 hours between this and your first post.

I think COTHers and non-COTHers alike have faced the reality of what happens with traumatic brain injury since Day 1 of Courtney's accident.

One doesn't have to post on COTH to appreciate Courtney's message and her fiercely determined self.

^THIS^

Something that she said really struck me...about the fact that it could have been worse.
That statement made me remember "IT" girl of the '80's, Terry Koenig. She rode the Trakehner, Inspekteur, back when the Trakehner was the hot "new" breed in North America. The ATA was incorporated in 1974, and the first stallion inspections took place in late 1977.
Terry suffered a head injury when, if I recall correctly, the horse she was mounted on reared unexpectedly. She hit her head on the overhead stable structure. Again, if I recall correctly, she was removed from life support some weeks later.
According to the ATA website, there was a "Koenig/NowPac Young Riders' Dressage Award Prior to 1994 these awards were presented to separate individuals. In 1995 the Board of Trustees decided that the trophy and scholarship should be given to one Junior or Young Rider and horse combination. As of 2009, this Award is no longer funded."
There is no other mention of this tragedy that I can find on the internet...there is not even a notation regarding who she was, or why there was an award with her name on it.

I am so grateful that Courtney is ready, willing, and able to tell her own story, which all of us need to hear. She is not allowing people to shrug and go on as before.

Thank you, Courtney!

Rest in peace, Terry. I never knew you, but you left an indelible mark on my heart.

Mukluk
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:41 AM
I think wearing a helmet is like wearing a seat belt. A very simple thing that may well save your life. PLEASE wear a helmet for you, your horse, and your loved ones.

GreyStreet
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:44 AM
Courtney is a brave and courageous woman to have made this video.

I have also seen first hand the effects of TBI. While I also do not "preach" to anyone who chooses not to wear a helmet, I do think sometimes the collective desire for freedom of choice and the general abhorrence of some people toward the idea of mandated helmet use is a bit foreign to me. Given the choice between something that could possibly save my life and the alternative, I'll continue to strap on my helmet every ride.

Similarly, I have a friend who absolutely will not wear a seat belt. He'll even go to the trouble of buckling the seat belt *underneath* his bum in order to stop the annoying warning sounds, but he won't actually put it on. To each his own, seems to be the general consensus, and that's fine - but, that doesn't mean I will ever *understand* the reason to NOT make sensible choices.

I've been wearing a helmet since the day I took my first riding lesson, but if Courtney's video (and the campaign in general) encourages anyone else to pick one up, it will be worth it.

cadance
Jul. 29, 2011, 01:15 AM
wow, that was definitely hard to watch at first. Even though its unfortunate, I think this is the best way to really drive the point home about TBIs. Its easy to sit back and read blog entries, but its completely different hearing it straight from the mouth of someone who suffered such an injury. Is this her first video appearance since her accident? Not going to lie, I've been curious about her rehabilitation and where she is with her progress so this was interesting in that aspect as well. She has come a long way.

I posted this video on my facebook for all my skiing friends to see- a lot of them don't wear helmets, even at the professional level and they have a huge influence on their young audience. Helmet safety is a hot issue in most sports, and this video really speaks to all of them.

dutchfan
Jul. 29, 2011, 03:28 AM
Someone needs to make cara witham watch this video before she mandates that a minor wear a top hat instead of a safety helmet that had a few sequins on it.....

TemJeito
Jul. 29, 2011, 05:04 AM
I found the video very moving. I found myself crying a little, mostly out of admiration for Courtney. The video is a kick in the pants to remember to wear a helmet but also to remember what's really important in life.

Selah, I don't mean to take away from your message, but I remember Terry Koenig's accident as I lived nearby at the time. As I recall, she suffered a neck injury and died of pneumonia as a complication. I may be wrong, but I don't think she suffered a TBI.

paulaedwina
Jul. 29, 2011, 06:34 AM
I've had the good fortune to have had trainers in my formative years who used helmets. As a result I use helmets. I don't take this for granted at all. It could have easily worked the other way. My equitation instructor makes all new riders watch a video on helmets and riding and it emphasizes how easily you can suffer at TBI; for example, your brain can get well jarred falling off a standing horse! She has a mandatory helmet rule at the barn - no exceptions. So with that tradition behind me, I am able to ride at other barns with more lax helmet rules and still wear my helmet. It is second nature.

Of course there are many ways you can hurt yourself, but this doesn't have to be one of them.

Paula

kansasgal
Jul. 29, 2011, 07:37 AM
This is only recent history. Back in the late 80's, a great video came out, called "Every Time, Every Ride", with every day riders talking about the importance of helmet safety, and how many falls are really unpredictable, from horses who would never intentionally do anything "naughty". Horses are unpredictable.

Very glad that there is a new campaign going.

I first knew of Courtney as the model for Lendon Gray's book, my favorite, Lessons With Lendon. What a wonderful way for Courtney to take a tragic event and hopefully have a positive impact.

paulaedwina
Jul. 29, 2011, 08:02 AM
I believe that's the video my equitation trainer uses - Every Time Every Ride.

Paula

jody jaffe
Jul. 29, 2011, 08:34 AM
I posted this on my Facebook page. I encourage everyone to do the same. Let's get it going viral.
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=113300883

selah
Jul. 29, 2011, 08:42 AM
I found the video very moving. I found myself crying a little, mostly out of admiration for Courtney. The video is a kick in the pants to remember to wear a helmet but also to remember what's really important in life.

Selah, I don't mean to take away from your message, but I remember Terry Koenig's accident as I lived nearby at the time. As I recall, she suffered a neck injury and died of pneumonia as a complication. I may be wrong, but I don't think she suffered a TBI.

Thanks Discobold...back then, I remember reading about Terry's accident in COTH...and somehow fully expected to read more competition results within a few weeks. I was stunned to learn that this bright, shining star had died...a story that ended right when it had gotten really really good.

Point was, that Courtney said it could have been worse, and she is so right. Due to her strength, perseverance, love of us all, and the grace of God...her star shines on.

meupatdoes
Jul. 29, 2011, 09:30 AM
Courtney is a brave and courageous woman to have made this video.

I have also seen first hand the effects of TBI. While I also do not "preach" to anyone who chooses not to wear a helmet, I do think sometimes the collective desire for freedom of choice and the general abhorrence of some people toward the idea of mandated helmet use is a bit foreign to me. Given the choice between something that could possibly save my life and the alternative, I'll continue to strap on my helmet every ride.

Similarly, I have a friend who absolutely will not wear a seat belt. He'll even go to the trouble of buckling the seat belt *underneath* his bum in order to stop the annoying warning sounds, but he won't actually put it on. To each his own, seems to be the general consensus, and that's fine - but, that doesn't mean I will ever *understand* the reason to NOT make sensible choices.

I've been wearing a helmet since the day I took my first riding lesson, but if Courtney's video (and the campaign in general) encourages anyone else to pick one up, it will be worth it.

Don't sit next to him in the passenger seat.

One of my parents' friends broke her left elbow because her husband, who was not wearing a seatbelt, flew across the car at her when they were side-impacted.

His choice not to wear a seatbelt; her elbow.

Non-seatbelted passengers become projectile during an accident and can deal fatal blows to fellow passengers in the process.

Dressage_Julie
Jul. 29, 2011, 09:44 AM
Cheers Courtney! I was speechless after watching this video. She is so brave and strong. I admit, before her accident I never wore a helmet. Since her accident, I now wear one all the time. Good for her for making an example for herself for the good of the dressage community.

b
Jul. 29, 2011, 09:49 AM
Thank you Courtney for making this very powerful video. You continue to be a star... truly an amazing woman! I have posted this to my facebook account. I think that all people who participate in sports that could place them at risk for head injuries should see this video.

GraceLikeRain
Jul. 29, 2011, 10:25 AM
Sent the link on to a fool-hardy sibling who won't wear a helmet because she is "just riding in the ring." Courtney was a beautiful rider who had more skill in one finger than I can even dream of acquiring in a lifetime (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueKKGjReXA0). Accidents happen in the blink of an eye. I appreciate the strength and courage it took to make this video and I hope that those who are on the fence really take her message to heart.

ThreeFigs
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:42 AM
Bless Courtney's courage for making this video. Bless her husband and family and friends -- they've had to watch her struggles up close. Yes, it's very hard to watch.

I hope she continues to improve.

Bugs-n-Frodo
Jul. 29, 2011, 02:34 PM
I remember Terry Koenig and I remember the accident. I remember thinking how tragic it was. What a sad loss.

Good for Courtney for having the strength and grace to do this video. I have a ton of respect for her because she has fought so hard in her recovery and because she has learned so much. I hope, beyond hope, that she is able to ride and compete in GP dressage again.

PiaffePlease
Jul. 29, 2011, 03:00 PM
Ive been following her updates on her website but I didn't realized the severity of her brain injury until I saw this video. I always wear a helmet when I ride. Ive always looked forward to wearing a top hat, but I feel naked without a helmet, just like I do without a seat belt. Every time you ride without a helmet, you risk having a worse injury than if you were wearing one.

Courtney, thank you for all you've done to promote helmets. You are an inspiration to all of us.

Blackberry Farm
Jul. 29, 2011, 03:32 PM
graceful, strong, and complete. thank you!

forward ride
Jul. 29, 2011, 03:52 PM
Wow. I remember watching Courtney and Ian Millar giving a riding demonstration at the Syracuse Invitational a few years ago. I remember thinking how cute she was and how she talked like a young person and yet was so gifted in the saddle that her talent was really beyond her years (obviously). What a stark contrast this is. Nearly moved to tears. What a courageous young woman. I'm gonna forward this along to a girl I board with who doesn't wear a helmet because it makes her forehead break out. :/

dalpal
Jul. 29, 2011, 04:04 PM
That's a gold medal performance.

Amen. What a brave woman.

I have to say....even today when it is hot as hell in NC...I thought.."Maybe just today, I'll ride without my helmet..it's hot" That thought was followed up with .."No you won't, because this could be today that your sweet steady eddie horse trips and falls and leaves you permanently injured"

God Bless you Courtney.

equinelerium
Jul. 29, 2011, 04:38 PM
Wow. Like others have said-I didn't realize how bad her injury was till watching that. I'm so glad she has turned such a tragic event into something constructive. I grew up on the "every time, every ride" videos, and I've never been on a horse without a helmet, frequently not by choice, but because my trainer/parents/barn manager required it...and had eyes in the backs of their heads. And I've had a few falls where the first thing through my head was "Thank God for this helmet."

She makes a really good point that an injury doesn't just impact you, but everybody around you. A very necessary message, and delivered with such bravery and grace. I pray she continues to improve and heal.

Eggplant_Dressing
Jul. 29, 2011, 04:43 PM
Courtney's video is awesome and I'm glad I was wearing my helmet a week ago because some kid (or kids) was in the neighbor's forest with either a paint gun or a pellet gun and the sound of it spooked my horse even though it wasn't very close.

I was by myself and often take my horse for a shady cool down in the forest after a lesson training ride. I've witnessed many experiences seeing people head for the ER after a fall without one. I'm glad Courtney did the video.

Anewpony
Jul. 30, 2011, 04:09 AM
I saw Courtney this winter in Wellington, and knew then about the extent of her injuries. When I first started watching the video, I had to shut it down because it was to awful too process.

The next day I wanted to show my husband it, and I finally watched it, more mentally prepared than I was when I initially watched it.

I really, really want to make an observation for Courtney from this winter to this video...

It is extremely clear to me that while you still have a way to go, you have made astounding progress in even a few months.

Just like if you have not seen a horse in a while, it's more apparent than when you see them every day. I want you to realize your intelligence comes though with your eye contact, and anyone who looks even slightly closely will recognize it.

Whatever anyone says about a TBI, I really think you are going to be the one in a million shot to get back together. Your speech has improved dramatically since January. Even your involuntary muscle control with your facial features is stronger.

Keep going girl, keep writing the articles for dressage today, keep remembering the feel. I wish Idocus was still around for you to get on, I bet you could take your time again and get your feel back.

If you have done this well in six/seven months, where will you be in six/seven months from now? KEEP GOING!!!

TemJeito
Jul. 30, 2011, 05:32 AM
I really, really want to make an observation for Courtney from this winter to this video...

It is extremely clear to me that while you still have a way to go, you have made astounding progress in even a few months.

This is what I've heard from people who saw Courtney over the winter :) Maybe what she needed was to start teaching again. And I believe her intellect was left unscathed by the accident though some might be misled by her speech.

dudleyc
Jul. 30, 2011, 06:48 AM
This past Thursday, I had the opportunity to take 2 lessons with Courtney!.

I am a little ashamed to admit that as I was driving to the barn I was wondering how beneficial the lessons would be.

I have regular access to Lendon Gray and frequent clinics with very BNT's. I can honestly say that the lessons with Courtney were among the best I have had -ever!

Oberon13
Jul. 30, 2011, 09:32 AM
Courtney's courage is above and beyond what I would ever hope to have for myself. She's amazing in every sense of the word. One of my dearest friends is a working student for her, and she says that Courtney's progress has been incredible and inspiring. I'm sure that any who come in contact with her would say the same (like dudleyc)!! :D

Thank you, Courtney, for being the bright light that you are. Keep on keeping on!

MyssMyst
Jul. 30, 2011, 11:08 AM
Thank you, Courtney.

dressage fan
Jul. 30, 2011, 01:41 PM
I have such respect and admiration for the graceful way you have handled your accident. You are an inspiration and your message now is having an important beneficial impact on so many. Thank you.

Watermark Farm
Jul. 30, 2011, 02:07 PM
Every year in Pony Club we watch the "Every time, every ride" video narrated by William Shatner. I'd like to show the kids this video with Courtney; it will have an impact on them. I am truly grateful to her for putting it out. What a fabulous woman.

It will have more impact if they can see what she sounded like before her accident. Does anyone have a link to a video interview with her prior?

Ms. Dye is a real inspiration. I'm glad more people are considering wearing helmets. I'm one who owes my life to one.

Ldbgcoleman
Jul. 30, 2011, 02:43 PM
Courtney is brave inspiring and beautiful. The one thing that drives me crazy is trainers who work with kids and don't just throw on a helmet. The trainer at the farm I'm at is fantastic but she hops on with no helmet and inappropriate footwear all the time. She requires her students to wear a helmet as soon as they enter the barn. There is another lady who is afraid to take her horse on trails but she rides in the areana with no helmet. I also don't want to preach but It does bother me.

SummerJet
Jul. 30, 2011, 11:43 PM
It was a great video, it's inspiring to watch. She's made incredible progress.

IronwoodFarm
Aug. 1, 2011, 08:19 AM
Courtney King Dye is a class act all the way around. Her bravery in confronting this issue of helmet safety is a real gift to all of us.

dghunter
Aug. 1, 2011, 05:47 PM
I'm so glad Courtney did this video. I used to not wear a helmet when I was younger and had a good friend suffer a TBI in a car accident. He didn't have airbags but was wearing a seat belt, the one thing that saved him. It was awful seeing him after the accident and the rest of the people in the brain trauma ward. He will never be 100% but is able to lead a full life, which we are all grateful for. I will never ride without a helmet. I also never drive without a seat belt and will not let my passengers ride without seat belts either. My car, my rules, if they don't like it, they can walk!

Blume Farm
Aug. 1, 2011, 09:09 PM
I didnt read all the posts so not sure if anyone already noted this, but free will is not a valid argument IMHO. We ALL pay for these accidents whether it be a loved one we must care for, increased insurance premiums, increased health costs to cover the care for un/under insured (sometimes foe life). i do not say this to put a money value on somones life but to point out that one persons irresponsible decisions can affect entire communities. It is selfishness in my mind on the person refusing to use any available safety equipment in any sport, activity, or motor vehicle.

I think CKD is amazingly brave to put a face and voice on tragedy. Most of us might have crawled into a cave of self pity. She is doing a service not only for the equestrian community but for safety in sport activities in general.

comingback
Aug. 2, 2011, 08:55 AM
Ive been following her updates on her website but I didn't realized the severity of her brain injury until I saw this video.


Its easy to sit back and read blog entries, but its completely different hearing it straight from the mouth of someone who suffered such an injury.

My mother fell off a horse while trail riding with friends. No helmet. She spent some time in a coma and the next two years learning how to speak, take care of herself, and do basic things like cook from a recipe or grocery shop. I was twelve and my brother was nine. Ironically, my mother forbade me from riding without a helmet but she thought she would be fine because she was just hacking out with friends.

Because she physically looked fine a couple of months after the injury people outside of our family unit lost perspective of how badly she was injured since they did not have to see her daily challenges first hand.


Wow. Like others have said-I didn't realize how bad her injury was till watching that. She makes a really good point that an injury doesn't just impact you, but everybody around you. A very necessary message, and delivered with such bravery and grace.


I didnt read all the posts so not sure if anyone already noted this, but free will is not a valid argument IMHO. We ALL pay for these accidents whether it be a loved one we must care for, increased insurance premiums, increased health costs to cover the care for un/under insured (sometimes foe life).


bluhof and equinelerium, it absolutely affects those around you. In my situation I essentially became a caretaker at a young age of my younger brother and sometimes my own mother. I was forced to grow up quickly because of someone elses actions. The strain on my family was enormous, both emotionally and financially. I am still suprised we made it through intact!

I find it ridiculous when anyone rides without a helmet because it is so simple to put on and they have so many different styles and price points. Given my history, I find it very selfish when parents take the stance they can ride without a helmet (for whatever reason) when they are responsible for a child. You could carry that argument out to anyone who has anybody in their life that cares about them. The impact of an individual's decision is not limited to only themselves, and I think people forget this aspect.

It takes not even a minute to put a helmet on, and bad injuries can happen to the best of us, as Courtney unfortunately has shown.

Sorry for the long post, but that video brought back some painful memories (in case you couldnt tell:)). I am very glad to see she is working through her recovery and spreading the message about helmet use. Hopefully this will make those who go without reconsider. I wish her all the best!

witherbee
Aug. 2, 2011, 09:24 AM
Comingback, that is a powerful story too and illustrates how our choices affect others.

I commend Courtney for making the video and am just so happy to see her progress.

I remember watching some movies about people with TBI and there are so many stages of recovery that can be hard on the person and the family (the anger, the impulse control issues, the loss of precious memories etc can make it feel like you are living with a stranger or an out of control teenager according to what I've read/seen). That said, any small steps are so important.

My worst fall came when my steady eddie Irish Draught FELL when we broke off into the canter on what was not obviously bad footing. He is 17.2h and about 1500 lbs and he went right up off his feet and came down. I was like a lawn dart and went way up and then straight down on my head. Thank goodness I wear my helmet every single ride - it is the only thing that saved me. I laid there unconscious and convulsing until just before the ambulance arrived. My young-ish riding instructor was horrified, my husband saw the whole thing, and my cowboy neighbor was the first thing I saw when I woke up - he had cradled my head in his hands and was just looking down at me with his cowboy hat shading my eyes. Accidents can happen any time at all - even on the safest of horses in apparently safe conditions.

Bless Courtney - she is a fighter!

suzy
Aug. 3, 2011, 10:43 AM
Having read about the severity of Courtney's injury, I was actually surprised at how beautifully she spoke. She obviously has to take her time, but she is totally coherent and articulate. It made me sad to hear her say how she still needs help with basic activities, so I was encouraged by Anewpony's post, saying that she has improved a lot in a few months time. With the rest of you, I will keep my fingers crossed that the improvement continues and she regains her independence. Meanwhile, it's inspiring to see her making the best of an incredibly difficult situation.

InWhyCee Redux
Aug. 3, 2011, 01:41 PM
Judging from the lack of responses to the video, I think CotHers were comfortable reading about Courtney but are not comfortable having to face the reality of what happens when you do have a brain injury.

It took courage and grace to produce this video.

I saw this video on Off Course (or was it H/J?) last night and there were plenty of positive responses, as there should be. It took real guts for CKD to do this and I can't imagine anyone not at least re-thinking (or re-confirming) their position on helmets.