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View Full Version : ElectroBraid planning/installation tips?



mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 28, 2011, 11:40 AM
Please do not tell me your horror stories about using ElectroBraid, it is sitting in the garage, so too late for that. :lol:
I have watched the video it came with but I was just wondering if anyone that had done it had any helpful tips. We are doing 4 strands on 4x4 PT posts, posts 5' tall. How would you space out the strands? Thanks!

Mali
Jul. 28, 2011, 12:53 PM
Please do not tell me your horror stories about using ElectroBraid, it is sitting in the garage, so too late for that. :lol:
I have watched the video it came with but I was just wondering if anyone that had done it had any helpful tips. We are doing 4 strands on 4x4 PT posts, posts 5' tall. How would you space out the strands? Thanks!

I don't know if it's the correct way, but what I did was figure out where I wanted my top and bottom strands to hit, and then placed the 2nd and 3rd strands equal distance from the top and bottom. I used a long piece of wood (dowel rod), and used 4 pieces of electrical taped wraped around it to mark where the strands would be, and then I would just stand it upright beside the post and screw my insulators in at the appropriate mark.

equinedriver
Jul. 28, 2011, 01:43 PM
I had it for many years and it held up great, however, we started out with the posts to far apart. I did t post line posts with 4x4 corner posts. All posts covered with white plastic sleeves and we did one strand of the 2" tape on the top with 4 strands of the braid underneath. I know you already have the braid, but I absolutely would put the tape on the top. It adds a lot of visibility. We never had an injury or any issue with it. I went out about once a year and tightened it up and checked everything, otherwise it was great. These were 5 to 10 acre pastures. Held up in the extreme Nebraska winter just fine.

I think we started out with the posts 20' apart, we were told by the company we could, but the strands just wouldn't stay tight with that long a run, so we went back and added a t post in between for 10' distances, and it was great after that. The white covers obviously added a fairly significant cost to the initial installation but IMHO worth every penny. We got lot's of compliments on how nice the fence looked.

mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 28, 2011, 02:05 PM
Thanks for the help! Our posts are 16' apart; I was thinking if I wanted to go to board fencing it would be easy to do that way. I was thinking about spacing out the posts farther (32) apart, but maybe thats not such a great idea!

geldingsRgreat
Jul. 28, 2011, 02:30 PM
We did our top strand VERY close to the top, so horses couldn't chew and crib the top of the poles. We have had ours for 6 years and have not had any issues...I think it's a smart buy.

dawglover
Jul. 28, 2011, 03:33 PM
Of utmost importance is getting your corner posts in solidly and braced before you start putting tension on your ElectroBraid. We used 6 x 6s for the corners with 4 x 4 horizontal bracing as well as wire diagonal bracing.
We've had ours up for over 10 years. Never any problems, low maintenance, just needs occasional tensioning and once in a while replacement of a couple of insulators, since I have a tendency to get too close with the mower sometimes.

I've heard all the horror stories of ElectroBraid too but I've found in my 40+ years of horsekeeping that a horse can and will hurt itself even in a padded room if determined.

Personal Champ
Jul. 29, 2011, 11:24 AM
I have an electrobraid knock off that I LOVE. It has been installed about a year now.

My posts are very far apart - about 50 feet - with sturdy, braced corners. My land is completely flat, though. I have 3 lines and did the same as the previous poster, figured out top and bottom height, then split it for the middle strand. The posts were pounded in by DH and FIL.

I had a young silly TB mare bounce off mine - it stretched a bit and boinged her back in the pasture, LOL. I too have heard horror stories but nothing but good here!

Phaxxton
Jul. 29, 2011, 12:02 PM
I don't know if it's the correct way, but what I did was figure out where I wanted my top and bottom strands to hit, and then placed the 2nd and 3rd strands equal distance from the top and bottom. I used a long piece of wood (dowel rod), and used 4 pieces of electrical taped wraped around it to mark where the strands would be, and then I would just stand it upright beside the post and screw my insulators in at the appropriate mark.

We did basically the same thing.

Our posts are no more than 20' apart at the widest, but I wanted closer posts for visibility reasons.

The hardest part for us was getting in the corner and gate posts (even with a post hole digger) because our soil is HARD red clay. Our line posts are t-posts with full vinyl sleeves, so they just look like thin vinyl posts. We do have one pasture the old owners fenced with electrobraid that has fiberglass rods as line posts. They are holding up okay, too.

Good luck! I think I posted a few threads back in late January / early February on this topic, too, so you may want to search for those. I remember getting some great tips.

No matter what, you want your end posts (including gate posts) and corner posts sunk deep and cemented in.

shakeytails
Jul. 29, 2011, 01:54 PM
I had Electrobraid on my old farm- loved it! I did the same as others- figured out top and bottom strand, and split the distance for the middle. I like to leave the botom strand high enough (I think mine are 16") for the horses to eat under the fence a little, and allow me to get a mower under with not too much difficulty. I used a scrap of wood with markings on it for strand height- I went along with the marker piece and a sharpie, DH followed with the insulators. Make sure your corners posts are big, deep and tamped in well. We rarely use concrete except where we're going to put either a large gate or pull hi-tensile fence. BTW- round posts are stronger and less likely to warp and twist than 4x4s or 6x6s- and I prefer creosote posts if I can get them over PT. Also, check the tag on any PT stuff you get from a lumberyard- a lot of it says not for ground contact. I get my posts from farm stores where they're still "CCA" treated.

casper324
Jul. 29, 2011, 07:56 PM
If you are doing 4 stands use 4 reels of electrobraid, run them all at once...............

Phaxxton
Jul. 29, 2011, 09:11 PM
If you are doing 4 stands use 4 reels of electrobraid, run them all at once...............

Definitely - especially if the area is large. We put a long pole through the middle of all the spools and put them on the bed of our truck.

Also, have someone pulling the strands as taut as possible as you go along -- because when you tension it, you are going to be amazed at how much slack comes out. If you don't pull it taut as you go, you'll waste a lot of fence material or run out before you get to the end. :lol:

Mali
Jul. 31, 2011, 06:18 PM
Good point - on the fence puller tool - buy a few of them (not just 1). That way if you run out of room stretching a strand, you can snag another puller on and continue stretching. Not ideal, but when it happens - you'll appreciate having an extra stretcher! Also, buy extra of the copper connecters, you'll want some on hand to make electrical connections, or tie in more fence lines later. It's easier to purchase them in the 10/bag and have an extra bag or so for future use. They aren't something you can find at the local big box store (although the 150 year old hardware store in town carries an item in the plumbing section that works almost as well, but is just a skitch narrower in diameter).

Blackberry Farm
Aug. 3, 2011, 01:34 AM
I love, love, love my electrobraid. Very low maintenance; just periodically check the voltage, and lop off branches to keep it from grounding out.

We installed 5' posts leaving 4' above ground, spaced 20' apart, actually, but on level ground. We have 3 strands running 16" apart.

We used spings in the eyelets to keep tension good over the years. We just pulled tight as we went through the installation.

When we started out, I did tons of research, but found the installation quite easy, and up keep fabulously simple! Compared to wooden fencing, it's quite easy to change things up when needed. I initially sectioned the large pasture into 3 portions, but have since opened it up. (I only have two.)

If somebody goes lame, you can quickly reconfigure your fence, or add addditional electrobraid to create a small paddock for a nice rehab spot. I also create a small paddock where they can be in a controlled environment during winter weather conditions. I even bought a couple more gate handles and created a way to bring them into the paddock, right by the barn during bad weather, then open the electrobraid gait to the main pasture when the weather clears. (hope that makes sense! ;)

I really like it! You hear stories of horses impaled by boards on wooden fences... To quote dawglover: I've heard all the horror stories of ElectroBraid too but I've found in my 40+ years of horsekeeping that a horse can and will hurt itself even in a padded room if determined.

Good luck. Think you'll enjoy it!

deltawave
Aug. 4, 2011, 08:57 AM
My Electrobraid fence is five years old and still perfect. :)

The fence does carry some tension (not like some others in terms of how much, but still quite a bit) and needs to be TIGHT to be safe. That means you really can't cheat on bracing and anchoring your corner and end posts. There is ONE gate in my fence line that I did not brace, trying to save time, and the posts started leaning. I have to keep that gate supported with a tensioning chain across the top to keep the posts from leaning further. It's not a big deal since the gate only gets used for mowing, but I would not skip the brace posts if I had to do it again! My only regret in the whole fencing system. ;)

My posts alternate between wood and T-posts (with caps) and are about 30 feet apart. We get ferocious wind and heavy snow, and this has been more than sufficient. I really like the spare, minimalist look of the fence, unobtrusive without a lot of vertical and horizontal lines to clutter up the relatively small (12 acre) property. Line posts are 4x4, corner posts are 6x6, cemented.

For the diagnonal bracing of the corners I have one paddock done with wire and tensioners, per their recommendations. It's OK but looks crappy. For the last paddock, I used some of the Electrobraid rope itself and turnbuckles and screw eyes from the hardware store to tension those diagonals and it looks VERY neat and works great. Can be re-tensioned by hand with just a few twists of the turnbuckle.

Don't take any shortcuts with the grounding rods. They really do matter. Do it properly, and find a place where the soil is good and preferably a little moist.

If you live where there's heavy snow, the little "switches" that you wire in that allow you to turn off a strand or two at the bottom are really handy. My bottom two (of four) strands are routinely buried in the winter, and I can just flip these little plastic switches and the power is off to those two strands.