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Daydream Believer
Jul. 21, 2011, 08:54 PM
Ok, this heat wave has got me stressed worrying about my animals. I spent the day trimming in this unbelievable heat and I'm so over it.

I am concerned about my cattle...I know that cattle cannot sweat like horses but rather the European cattle like I have (Black Baldies) can only sweat around their noses.

Like many places, we are having a horrible heat wave. I noticed tonight at chores time that they seemed to be panting. They were OK...came up and got their alfalfa pellets and had a good appetite...but we have another stinking 3 or more days of this heat.

They do have shade in their shelter and they do use it. What else can I do to help them cope? Make a muddy place for them to soak their feet? I doubt they will stand for hosing...they are not very tame. Am I overworrying the matter?

Tomorrow will be at least as hot as today. It was 100F at 3:30 and the heat index was 115F. I am worried about the collective stress...as it builds and the animals get more stressed.

I'm struggling right now to save chickens...we are going out in a few minutes and moving about 80+ broilers back out of the pasture into a shedrow coop I have for the duration of the heat wave. I'm losing them in this heat. Loss two broilers yesterday and 5 today.:( Poor chooks just suffer badly in this weather with their feathers. I'm moving the hen coop in the morning under a tree for shade, and they have a fan...they fare better than the heavier broiler types. Ducks are doing OK but they can go for a swim...these are meat ducks and yes they have a kiddie pool. :) I figure they may as well enjoy their short stay on earth.

Horses are OK and seem to be the best adapted to the heat. I can look out at 4 pm and the colts are having mock battles and running so I'm not too worried about them. They have plenty of water and shade if they want it...which they never seem to.

mronthebit
Jul. 21, 2011, 09:01 PM
You can hose them off and/or set up a fan if you're that worried about them, but I expect your cattle will weather the heat okay. We've got a lot of black baldies down here on the TN/AL line and ours did just fine back in Aug 07 when the *average* high for the month was an even 100 degrees.

MistyBlue
Jul. 21, 2011, 09:18 PM
I read on MSN news today that some areas have lost up to 1500 head of cattle due to the heat wave. Of course there weren't any more details as in where they were, how they were being kept, if it was a drought area and water was limited, etc.

This heat is brutal, you trimmed in it??? More power to you, I'd have puked and passed out.

Can you temporarily fence off/move the cattle to a smaller confinement so you can hit them all with the hose whether they like it or not? Only other thing I can think of with cattle would be keep up lots and lots of cool fresh water and maybe freeze them some treats overnight tonight? I do this for my horses...I use the cheap Gladware plastic containers about the size of a brick and fill them with juice and then freeze overnight. Then I can either pop them out for them to lick or pop them oout and into a water bucket as a huge floating flavored ice cube.

Or if you have a big chest freezer, try it with some juice mixed in water (or molasses mixed in water) and some cut up apple/carrot pieces or whatever cattle like to snack on and toss it in a 5 gallon bucket and freeze that whole thing. Stick it on the grass upside down for a few minutes in that heat and it should slide right out and all the cattle can lick at it.

Nes
Jul. 21, 2011, 09:57 PM
It's 46C here today, I feel your pain :).

We hosed the cattle down during feed time (really nice cold cold well water), they actually seem to be doing quite okay with the heat. Actually my horse spent most of the afternoon out grazing in the sun, really didn't seem to upset about the heat.

It's the chickies I'd definitely be worried about. Our older chicks/ducks/turkeys (2 mons) have been panting all day, I've been re-filling water with cold and re-filled the duck pond too, but they're all still HOT in the chicken coop. Opened up every window I could, but as much as I'd like to leave the door open, unless I'm going to sit out there with a shot-gun all night... coyotes don't stop just because it's hot!

We got meat birds today too, but they are in the barn which is stone & nice in cool. Actually I just checked on them and they are all sleeping in a big bunch!
(No they are NOT cold, I've found chickens just like to sleep on each other! Actually they REALLY like sleeping on my ducks, apparently they are fuzzy and soft :lol:)

Daydream Believer
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:08 PM
Yes, I trimmed today...and yesterday and the day before that. Truly, if there is a more thankless job than a farrier in this type of weather, I am not sure what it is. Since I don't use metal shoes, at least I don't have to use a forge...small blessing. The worst part is the flies on the sweaty miserable horses and trying to hang onto their legs while they twitch and jerk. Seriously, fly spray is about worthless in these conditions.

We just got in from moving 85 9 week old meat birds in from the pasture shelter. This is the first time all summer we've had any losses and the third batch we've raised. Poor chooks are still panting and it's 94F heat index now and 84F actual temp. (We have a weather station which is kind of neat so I know exactly what it is at any time).

I'm hoping we got them out of there before we lose anymore. Several seemed pretty weak and stressed. They are only a week or two from slaughter so losing them now is a major bummer. We have them in a coop with two fans running tonight. I have some week old broiler chicks in the brooder in the same building and their lamp has not been on for a day or so now. Since they are not fully feathered they are doing Ok.

I appreciate the ideas for the cattle. I can try hosing them...see if they like it. I could set up a sprinkler for them also and see if they like it. They seem pretty smart at taking care of themselves so I probably am worrying over it for nothing. I saw the news headlines also about the major losses of cattle in the midwest.

My turkeys seem fine as do my ducks. It's interesting to see how the critters deal with the heat. I'd imagine sheep are tough this time of year. I am thinking of getting some so if anyone knows much about managing sheep in heat, it would be interesting to hear about it.

fivehorses
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:14 PM
Its stinking hot here in NH, it was 85 with a heat index of 95 an hour ago. It is not cooling off.

I saw a flock of crows in the field today, they were actually panting. My chickens did the same thing, put their wings out and pant.

MistyBlue
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:28 PM
DDB, are you trimming at home or clients' horses? Either way, try bringing a pedestal fan with you for trimming. My farrier does, has a big floor fan he brings to jobs and he has that plugged in and on high before he sets up anything else. The horses stand with their nose in it happily sweat and fly-free. (blows hard enough to blow flies away)

I'm not even sure a forge would be felt in this heat, LOL! It's so hot out there by noon in the sun that it would be hard to tell if the forge was on or not. :winkgrin:

Chickens don't do great in heat. Well, they do awesome at 350* for a while. :lol: But outside, not so much. Poor things. Do you have a mister? I bought two years ago on Walmart online. Awesome things and cheap as heck. Just hook up the hose, clip it where you want it strung along and position nozzles where you want the mist to go. IIRC I bought a 25' one and a 15' one and both together with shipping were about $60 or so? Maybe misting the chickens during the day will help?

We drove by some dairy cows tonight...all standing almost back deep in their pond. You could almost hear them all saying, "Aaahhhhh!"

Daydream Believer
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:46 PM
Misty...I generally do use a fan. It is a godsend and carry a good one with me in my truck. Unfortunately the place I worked today, fans are not allowed. I know...weird rules but the owner is about 90 years old and very set in his ways. Also we are working outside under a huge pecan tree. Usually it's very pleasant but it was pretty stifling today.

The mister is a good idea. I'll check them out on line.

Our long range plans include some ponds but it will be a while before we can afford to have them dug.

jetsmom
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:58 PM
The mister is a good idea. I'll check them out on line.

.

I got a mister for the shade shelter in the pasture. Works great, and drops the temp about 15 degrees.

spinandslide
Jul. 22, 2011, 10:26 AM
I wish I could offer some insight on your chickens, but I have none..I know I am caring for my neighbor's layers and broilers while they are away and we have had 36 consecutive days of over 100 degree temps..they are all weathering fine..

Cows, just make sure they have constant water and shade. I have been giving mine electrolytes as well..

JSwan
Jul. 22, 2011, 10:59 AM
DB - All you can do is make sure the cattle have free access to water, shade, and salt/mineral block. Another thing you can do is make sure whatever form of fly/insect control you're using (ie, back rubber) is functioning - as the flies will no doubt be tormenting them.

No advice on the chickens, in the past I've frozen bottles of water and placed them in the coop, but they all seem to just want to hunker in the shade and wait it out. So - for them, water and shade.

Please take care of yourself, too.

tle
Jul. 22, 2011, 11:14 AM
Moved my 26 chicks/turkeys from one building to another because of the heat. Can't put them in the barn yet -- nowhere predator proof. they're currently hanging otu in a gravel floor area of my attached garage. Not great as it's still hot in there, but not NEARLY as hot as it was getting in the brooding house. I think the high ceilings are working. They do have a pedestal fan in with them as well as multiple water cans. The turkeys seem to pant before the chicks do. Have been trying to put frozen gallon jugs of water in with them, but they seem to melt before the heat of the day since I have to put them in before I go to work. Not sure it's doing much of anything.

My laying hens seem to be doing quite well actually. Their room is dirt floor on the east side of the barn. My egg production JUST dropped yesterday - from 18-ish per day to 12 yesterday. otherwise I've been doing really well. Don't see them during the day but once the barn starts throwing a shadow (or early inthe am) they're out pecking around.

The cow, 9 month old angus, has been spending a LOT of time in the barn - the only real shade. I think he's going out and grazing at night. Still comes running for his small bit of feed. I'm taking that as a good sign that he's weathering the weather well.

Keeping the dog inside as much as possible, not that he minds. Being a newfy, he certainly prefers the cold to the heat. Went out with me to feed at 8:30 last night and it was still about 85. Came in and immediately went running upstairs to the bedroom - where the only AC in the hosue was running. He loves being in that room and sitting with his face RIGHT in front of the box fan I have going to push the cool air out into the hallway. Needless to say, he's staying home this weekend when I go announce at Gemwood Horse Trials.

goodhors
Jul. 22, 2011, 12:35 PM
If you do mist or spray the cattle with water, make sure there is a fan or breeze to blow off the wet. Just like with hosing a hot horse, it is the water REMOVAL that cools the animal down.

Leaving a wet animal (cattle or horse) standing, no fan, no scraping water off, no breeze, is the same as putting his winter blanket on! That wet hair just HOLDS his body heat inside, so he is then hotter than before you wetted him down. Cows are even hotter than horses, because their stomach ferments the feed before moving it along the digestives system. Cattle put off a LOT of body heat at any time, so you can't just leave them standing wet with no air moving over them!!

If they like the shed, perhaps a fan inside to keep a breeze moving over their bodies would be the best help. Even tame, I can't believe our calves would freely stay for hosing down! We do bathe them tied to the washrack, but there is no choice in it for them to make. Then they get scraped and water blown off, before getting put back in pasture.

We have fans on our 2 calves at night when they are in stalls. Just keeps the air moving so they are not as hot. They are pastured outside all day, with trees to shade them if they want. That field is rolling, so there is usually a good breeze moving under the trees. Flies are severe in this heat with greenheads and deer flies added to the small ones. Our calves are wearing belled collars with fly tags on, helps a little. Only another week until Fair, then no more 4-H cattle. These two are nice, we're going to miss them.

carolprudm
Jul. 22, 2011, 02:00 PM
Yes, I trimmed today...and yesterday and the day before that. Truly, if there is a more thankless job than a farrier in this type of weather, I am not sure what it is. Since I don't use metal shoes, at least I don't have to use a forge...small blessing. The worst part is the flies on the sweaty miserable horses and trying to hang onto their legs while they twitch and jerk. Seriously, fly spray is about worthless in these conditions.

We just got in from moving 85 9 week old meat birds in from the pasture shelter. This is the first time all summer we've had any losses and the third batch we've raised. Poor chooks are still panting and it's 94F heat index now and 84F actual temp. (We have a weather station which is kind of neat so I know exactly what it is at any time).

I'm hoping we got them out of there before we lose anymore. Several seemed pretty weak and stressed. They are only a week or two from slaughter so losing them now is a major bummer. We have them in a coop with two fans running tonight. I have some week old broiler chicks in the brooder in the same building and their lamp has not been on for a day or so now. Since they are not fully feathered they are doing Ok.

I appreciate the ideas for the cattle. I can try hosing them...see if they like it. I could set up a sprinkler for them also and see if they like it. They seem pretty smart at taking care of themselves so I probably am worrying over it for nothing. I saw the news headlines also about the major losses of cattle in the midwest.

My turkeys seem fine as do my ducks. It's interesting to see how the critters deal with the heat. I'd imagine sheep are tough this time of year. I am thinking of getting some so if anyone knows much about managing sheep in heat, it would be interesting to hear about it.


Hair sheep would probably be the easiest.

Do you have a power washer? Ours puts out a fine mist that feels great on a hot day. Disclaimer:Obviously you do need to be careful how powerful it is and where you aim it

spinandslide
Jul. 22, 2011, 02:23 PM
regarding sheep-

I was always warned that sheep are "looking for a place to die"..I now call bull hockey..at least in the case of my dorpers.

they are, IMO, the absolute BEST breed of sheep for Arid dry hot climates.

I have a small flock of them and as I have said, we are on our 35th or 36th consecutive day of over 100 degree temps..they are faring the best out of all my livestock. They rest in the shade, are good drinkers, but I see them out grazing too. They love weeds and are very hardy...and, being hair sheep, they do shed, so they don't over heat! :)

A BIG BIG reason I chose them was due to all of these traits.

I know a woman on another board, in VA, was looking for dorper sheep and she was having heck finding ewe lambs in her state...I am not sure how popular they are where you live.

smokygirl
Jul. 22, 2011, 02:34 PM
Yes, I trimmed today...and yesterday and the day before that. Truly, if there is a more thankless job than a farrier in this type of weather, I am not sure what it is. Since I don't use metal shoes, at least I don't have to use a forge...small blessing. The worst part is the flies on the sweaty miserable horses and trying to hang onto their legs while they twitch and jerk. Seriously, fly spray is about worthless in these conditions.

We just got in from moving 85 9 week old meat birds in from the pasture shelter. This is the first time all summer we've had any losses and the third batch we've raised. Poor chooks are still panting and it's 94F heat index now and 84F actual temp. (We have a weather station which is kind of neat so I know exactly what it is at any time).

I'm hoping we got them out of there before we lose anymore. Several seemed pretty weak and stressed. They are only a week or two from slaughter so losing them now is a major bummer. We have them in a coop with two fans running tonight. I have some week old broiler chicks in the brooder in the same building and their lamp has not been on for a day or so now. Since they are not fully feathered they are doing Ok.

I appreciate the ideas for the cattle. I can try hosing them...see if they like it. I could set up a sprinkler for them also and see if they like it. They seem pretty smart at taking care of themselves so I probably am worrying over it for nothing. I saw the news headlines also about the major losses of cattle in the midwest.

My turkeys seem fine as do my ducks. It's interesting to see how the critters deal with the heat. I'd imagine sheep are tough this time of year. I am thinking of getting some so if anyone knows much about managing sheep in heat, it would be interesting to hear about it.

i can only think of one job worse in the heat. I would not want to be a refuse management collector (aka garbage man).

Tiramit
Jul. 22, 2011, 03:22 PM
Can you set up a mister in the shade? I've found that having a darker, cool spot is key to my animals and the only way that's happening in this heat is if water is involved.

I let our chickens and ducks out of their pens earlier and they went straight for a wetland area under bushes. They seemed much better than in their coop and runs, despite sun shades ventilation. Our sheep seem better in the shade as well.

Our horses like to hang out inside - if they aren't splashing around in their water! :lol:

carolprudm
Jul. 22, 2011, 05:22 PM
I know a woman on another board, in VA, was looking for dorper sheep and she was having heck finding ewe lambs in her state...I am not sure how popular they are where you live.

A friend of mine has Kathadins (sp?) SW of Charlottesville VA. She does very well selling the meat

Bluey
Jul. 22, 2011, 06:13 PM
Some on cattle management in the heat:

http://www.yourcattle.com/members/articles/Nutrition/water_reduce_heat.html

Daydream Believer
Jul. 22, 2011, 08:33 PM
Thanks for all the ideas and help. Good link Bluey, thanks. I do have troughs and plenty of water but mine is not in shade. I hope one day to fix that.

The large animals did OK today. I could see they were hot but coping.

Even under fans today in my barns I lost a few more chickens. Two broilers and one hen are gone. Damn. The hen was one of my broiler hens I kept with the idea of hatching my own broilers. The larger chickens definitely do not take the heat as well as the smaller standard breeds. In the middle of the day my Wyandotte pullets were running around the yard foraging. I think they are too young to have any sense but they pulled it off.

The ducks and turkeys are coping well. No problems with them. I am researching some misting systems for the future.

Good info on the sheep...I'll check those breeds out. I love lamb and I think we'd have interest for lamb at the farmer's market.

It is 8:30 pm and it's 92F with a heat index of 103F. Such freaking crazy weather even for our area.

MistyBlue
Jul. 22, 2011, 08:57 PM
DDB, I stopped by the feed store today and chatted with the owner. (she has chickens)
She does two things to keep her chooks alive in extreme heat.
*She fills soda bottles with water, freezes them overnight and puts them in with the chickens in in the nesting boxes or nearby. She said her chickens either sit on them or lean up against them during the day.
*She puts them out with a sprinkler in the shade. She said the chickens love the sprinkler and they stand under the water, walk through it and get as soaked as possible.

The farm down the road from me today with the cows (10 ladies, all preggers, they pasture there for the summer) had all the cows running full speed for their pond when we drove by tonight again. I don't often see cows at a full cow-gallop. I'm guessing some of the big bomber flies had just shown up because they were skidding down the pond bank and one just took a flying leap down into the water. :eek: :lol:

You know it's freaking hot out when you drive by the Durham Dairy (local home made ice cream spot) and nobody is there. That place is packed open to close all season...but too hot today for anyone to stand outside and order icecream. That's where we went for dinner...too hot to eat anything else but icecream. And I don't even really like icecream.

Daydream Believer
Jul. 22, 2011, 10:44 PM
Great idea with the ice bottles Misty Blue. I wonder about even buying bags of ice and just tossing it in the bedding to melt? At least they could lay on it. The downside would be the moisture in the bedding but if it saves some chickens, it might be worth it.

I may have to rethink the Scottish Highland Cattle for our future heritage beef breed program. I'm not sure the poor buggers could take this sort of heat. I have heard they will adapt to hot climates but wow...I guess all over the US, regardless of breeds, cattle are having to adapt, cope or die. I hate to think of livestock dying and the losses to the farmer. My chickens are not super valuable but they do represent a loss to our small farm that we have to cope with. :-(

I think I found a great breed of sheep. St Croix Hair Sheep...a landrace breed from the Caribbean that are well adapted to heat and humidity and very hardy. Low maintenance with no shearing needed either.

http://www.stcroixsheep.org/char.html

camohn
Jul. 23, 2011, 12:11 AM
on the news today they showed one farm with a fan sprinkler set up out in the pasture and the horses were standing under it.

spinandslide
Jul. 23, 2011, 12:41 AM
A friend of mine has Kathadins (sp?) SW of Charlottesville VA. She does very well selling the meat

they seem to be more popular out that way..I dont know why..:(..I just know this poster found alot of Kat's, but not alot of dorpers..

who knows..:)

the meat from the dorper is very good..we had some dorper/kat cross steaks afew weeks ago..I think if more people tried it, they would like it..it doesnt taste "sheepy"

spinandslide
Jul. 23, 2011, 12:44 AM
Great idea with the ice bottles Misty Blue. I wonder about even buying bags of ice and just tossing it in the bedding to melt? At least they could lay on it. The downside would be the moisture in the bedding but if it saves some chickens, it might be worth it.

I may have to rethink the Scottish Highland Cattle for our future heritage beef breed program. I'm not sure the poor buggers could take this sort of heat. I have heard they will adapt to hot climates but wow...I guess all over the US, regardless of breeds, cattle are having to adapt, cope or die. I hate to think of livestock dying and the losses to the farmer. My chickens are not super valuable but they do represent a loss to our small farm that we have to cope with. :-(

I think I found a great breed of sheep. St Croix Hair Sheep...a landrace breed from the Caribbean that are well adapted to heat and humidity and very hardy. Low maintenance with no shearing needed either.

http://www.stcroixsheep.org/char.html

in a cruel, ironic twist of fate, we are having cattle die from TO MUCH water down here too..apparently, the cattlemen are moving their cows to new pastures with tanks with water and the cattle are "gorging" on water and dieing shortly after..

I am not familar with St. Croix..but I know abit about the Barbadoes..which are a carribean breed as well...Have you been to the Homesteading Today website? lots of info over there.

smokygirl
Jul. 23, 2011, 12:56 AM
Check out the Wiltshire sheep.. they are pretty awesome. A friend of mine has them and Lincolnshire Longwools (would not recommend them in the heat lol). He inherited the Lincolnshires and feels a tie to them, but he thinks the Wiltshires are a much handier breed to have.

wireweiners
Jul. 27, 2011, 05:06 PM
As long as your cattle have plenty of shade, water and salt, they should do fine. They will lay in the shade and pant, but they will make it. If they have a pond or muddy spot they will stand in it to cool off but this can contribute to foot rot and mastitis. I would not recommend Scotch Highlanders in a southern climate if you are serious about raising cattle. They just don't do well in the heat. Brahma and brahma cross cattle do better in the heat. If you insist on a heritage breed, then you might look into shorthorns, Devons or American White Park cattle. We had some White Park cows that I just looooved. They were good natured, did well in the Arkansas climate and were excellent mother cows. Plus they were really pretty, white with black points or spots.

Chickens just don't do well in the heat. I would think that they would be better off in an open field with plenty of shade and water than in a coop, but I don't really know. I know that the big broiler houses have these ginourmous exhaust fans to venilate the houses and they still have high losses during hot weather.

My sister raises meat sheep. I think she keeps her breeding stock sheared during hot weather and otherwise treats them the same as cattle. She kept misters on her show sheep when her kids were showing.

Daydream Believer
Jul. 27, 2011, 09:15 PM
I had not updated you all for a few days. We got the chickens through the heat wave with no more losses. I would hold my breath and check out the coop every evening for chores but all would be fine.

wireweiners...thanks for the advice on cattle. I actually was also considering the "Piney Woods" type cattle....they are smaller but quite durable...kind of like smaller longhorns, Spanish in origin..which appeals to me ;-) and very adapted to the south. They are similar to Florida Cracker cattle. Like most landrace type breeds, they are pretty durable. It will probably not be this year that we do any serious acquisitions so I'm sort of researching and learning, so I do appreciate the ideas. I'll check out the White Park cattle. I've never heard of them.

Our pasture pens are shaded and we put up tarps for additional shade but the problem was air movement or lack of it. When it got hot and stagnant and there was no breeze, that is when we were losing chickens. I found by bringing them back up to the main barn areas, putting them in shade and putting fans on them, we had no more losses

My neighbors raise chickens in the big houses and he said that they now have a misting system but still can lose a lot...as in thousands...when it gets like this. Another pasture farmer in our area who runs several hundred hens free range lost 40 in one day...so I'm feeling pretty grateful that my losses were much lower proportionately. With less chickens, I was able to do more to keep them alive...so in this case it was just our smaller size working in my favor.

One tip one person told me at last Saturday's farmers market that the big chicken producers do is to walk into the houses and make the chickens move. They will pile up near the waterers and smother each other so by forcing them up every so often, they can reduce their losses. I did notice that also..mine would try to sit in their water and all would crowd around it....so I did the same thing and made mine get up and move around and that seemed to help.

wireweiners
Jul. 28, 2011, 12:11 PM
If you like horns, do a google search for British White Park cattle. They are an ancient breed supposedly dating back to ancient Celts. They have some awesome horns. They are quite rare. I've only found one herd in the US, in Colorado. During WWII, Churchill sent representatives of the breed to a zoo in the US in order to preserve it when the UK was under attack. They look similar to Longhorns are are probably one of the Longhorns ancestors. The American White Parks were developed from the British White Parks but they are a more "domesticated" breed with a better temperment, better milk production and they are mostly polled. The British White Parks are a much more primitive breed of cattle.

As far as walking chicken houses, when I was in college, the Ag Dept. had (and still does) a small farm for hands on learning. One of my jobs was to walk the chicken houses to stir up the broilers and pick up the dead chickens. Talk about nasty! In those days we also had these long, open type waterers that had to be cleaned daily. You had to dump the dirty water in a bucket, clean the waterer out with a dish mop and when the bucket was full, carry it outside the house to dump it. Believe me, that job was a great incentive to work hard and get a degree. I'm surprised they would be using misters in a broiler house. The water mixes with the chicken manure and creates amonia which can blister the birds' breasts and lower the value of the meat. Wet litter in the houses was a big no no back when I worked in one.

grayarabpony
Jul. 29, 2011, 01:07 AM
My husband's grandparents always had chickens (Banty crosses I think) and they hung out in the shade of the garden and in the crawlspaces under the tobacco barn etc in the summer and they weathered the heat just fine.

My neighbors had longhorn cattle for several years. Good cattle for someplace hot, although these days maybe better for looking at than as beef cattle, I don't know. Very colorful. Funny thing about them is that they looked much bigger at a distance than they did up close.