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View Full Version : Weedwhacking around no-climb or field fence



fordtraktor
Jul. 21, 2011, 09:11 AM
Anyone do this successfully? I may just be an idiot but I just eat up string after string hitting the fence. What am I doing wrong? I've been pruning my weeds with pruning shears, which I cannot imagine is a very efficient use of my time but I hate the place to look trappy.

Thanks in advance!

Mrs.ChickenBritches
Jul. 21, 2011, 09:44 AM
If your fence goes all the way to the ground then I'm not sure what you could do. DH always makes sure there is a small gap between the ground and the fence just for this reason.

Would spraying the weeds so they dont need to be cut be an option?

tasia
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:01 AM
You might try a different gauge/brand/shape string. Some wear better than others. I do my perimeter fencing, which is no climb with top board and don't seem to go thru string that fast. Good luck :)

Nes
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:02 AM
#1 I'm not sure this is actually "safe".

Hubby uses a plastic blade, I can't remember the name of the thing but you get them in the same section at the store. That this CHEWS through weeds like you wouldn't believe!

I think you have to try not to hit the fence while you do that though... :lol:

Bacchus
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:28 AM
Have you seen the new infomercial for a weedeater that has string that can be used on fence? ;) Seriously, maybe it actually works.

Other than that, I'd spray.

birdsong
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:30 AM
Herbicide.

Bacchus
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:30 AM
https://pivotrim.com/

beaulilly
Jul. 21, 2011, 02:59 PM
Hubby walked into the room as I was watching the infomercial and said "BUY IT!"

He can put a drunken sailor to shame when he has to weedwhack the no-climb since he is constantly breaking the spool, has to stop, mess with it, go another 50 feet, stop, etc.

I've never bought something from an infomercial though. Googling the product shows different types of them for about the same price.

Hmmm, I'm very very tempted. I'll post back if I go ahead with some reviews.

Sithly
Jul. 21, 2011, 03:09 PM
I used to do it with a very low speed, just barely enough to knock down the weeds, and sort of let the string sort of "wrap" around the fence. If you go at it revved up to the highest speed, the string will just break off.

This technique worked pretty well for chain link fence for the few years I was responsible for doing it. IME you will go through more string no matter what you do, but that method helps.

Bacchus
Jul. 21, 2011, 03:17 PM
Hubby walked into the room as I was watching the infomercial and said "BUY IT!"

LOL. My husband said the same thing when we saw it on TV:)

Haven't done it yet, though.

fordtraktor
Jul. 21, 2011, 04:27 PM
Hmm, your husbands appear to weedwhack. I adore mine but he does not seem to have come with that feature installed. A pity.

Cathy D
Jul. 21, 2011, 04:30 PM
We use Round Up.

carolprudm
Jul. 21, 2011, 04:35 PM
We use Round Up.
LOL, yup but only where we don't have goats.

If you have no climb the goats will keep their side nice and tidy. The difference between the goat field and the no goat field is dramatic

Char
Jul. 21, 2011, 04:41 PM
Another vote for Round Up. We just make sure to keep the horses off that pasture for about a week afterwords, just in case.

wsmoak
Jul. 21, 2011, 04:54 PM
What, nobody sets them on fire? We have a torch on a long handle that connects to a propane tank. I think it's called a 'weed dragon' though I'm not sure we have the name brand one.

Probably not the best idea if you're in a drought though. :)

Melelio
Jul. 21, 2011, 06:18 PM
Well _I_ saw the infomercial and sent the link to my DH...he bought it! We don't have it in hand yet, but as soon as we do I know he'll try it on the same type of fence issue the OP mentioned, so we'll report back.

fivehorses
Jul. 21, 2011, 08:23 PM
If that pivo trim can cut through plywood, I would imagine it might do a number on your no climb fencing too.

Tom King
Jul. 22, 2011, 07:43 AM
Don't just slam the string into whatever is in it's way. It's good at cutting grass, not wood. Notice where the perimeter of the cutting area is, and just sweep that along the edge of grass next to whatever it's up against. Heavy string on a good sized string trimmer lasts a long time if you don't slam it into something hard.

Dead grass from Roundup under a fenceline is just plain ugly. With a powerfull string trimmer, and good technique, you can cut along the outside of a fenceline almost as fast as you can walk. We use a Stihl FS110.

tasia
Jul. 22, 2011, 08:26 AM
Don't just slam the string into whatever is in it's way. It's good at cutting grass, not wood. Notice where the perimeter of the cutting area is, and just sweep that along the edge of grass next to whatever it's up against. Heavy string on a good sized string trimmer lasts a long time if you don't slam it into something hard.

Dead grass from Roundup under a fenceline is just plain ugly. With a powerfull string trimmer, and good technique, you can cut along the outside of a fenceline almost as fast as you can walk. We use a Stihl FS110.

This:yes: I hate the dead grass look. It's also a good idea to be careful around your fence posts. Hitting the bottom of the posts repeatedly does damage them.

Bacchus
Jul. 22, 2011, 09:21 AM
Hmm, your husbands appear to weedwhack. I adore mine but he does not seem to have come with that feature installed. A pity.
Mine doesn't weedwack, but he will pay someone else to, so it's just as good;)

The dead grass look isn't pretty, but it's efficient. Saves a ton of time, which is money, which is better spent on other things besides weedwacking in my book!

goodhors
Jul. 22, 2011, 02:46 PM
I use the .095 size ROUND weed whacker string for all my cutting. It lasts a LOT longer than any of the other sharp edged strings of any size. The other BIG seller for me, is that the round string SELDOM gets hot enough to melt together. Melted string requires turning off the weed whacker, taking off the spool, unwinding to break the welded strings apart. Then you have to rethread, rewind the string and load the spool again. Not usually a 2 minute job.

I have LOTS of the sharp edge string, hate the stuff because of the melt problem when you are doing a LOT of weed whacking. That stopping every so often really cuts into my production cutting for distances. I have a LOT of fenceline, so speedy cutting is important to me.

So I just keep buying the round string in huge spools, to rewind new onto the weed whacker spool when it runs out. So far, the round stuff beats any of the sharp edged strings in being long lasting during work. I think I have about 5 kinds, various shapes of sharp edged string for the weed whacker. It is all in the pile of stuff to be sold at the next garage sale.

Son used those heads with plastic blades years ago, before they quit making them. With lots of use, wear, the plastic blades flew off and could be rather painful if they hit you or things around you. They were deemed to dangerous to allow to be used back then. Funny to see them again, wonder what they changed to prevent that happening again? The plastic blades did a great job cutting weeds, sprouted saplings on the fenceline here. Lots tougher cutting ability than mere string. But we have high tensile wire here, so there is a big gap between the bottom wires and dirt.

With some practice, I would think you could cut beside the fence, stay out of the wire. I have some short distances of chainlink for the dogs, where I cut weeds like that. You do have to cut both sides, adding to cutting time, but it can be neatly edged and not use up all your string.

I don't spray Round-up type products on my fence wires, takes the galvanized coating off, shortening the life of the fence. I have a long wand, to spray under the fence wires, Again, I have a good sized gap under the wire, helps me keep the spray off the wire. I paid for fence installation once, don't want to do new fencing.

I "thought" no climb wire was supposed to be installed with the gap on the bottom? I know field fence is installed with a gap locally. You put electric down low to keep animals off the wire, predators out. Weeds do grow up on fence, but the gap allows trimming or spraying without getting into the wires. I also don't weed whack on the posts much, they are wood and need to last a LONG time.

For face protection I have gotten a mask from the hardware store. Plastic face shield with a head piece to hold in place. They sell them for using with grinders and polishers, not expensive. The BEST part is everything is away from your face, so they are a lot cooler to wear in heat than goggles for sideways protection beside your eyes. I do wear safety glasses too. But my weed whacker is pretty powerful, so it sometimes throws up small rocks, cut sticks, and my face was taking a beating. Husband bought this for me after seeing the cuts on my face and a fat lip when I was finished working. Have since had rocks hit the shield, that would have broken a tooth, so I was really glad I had the shield! And while warm to wear, I always have long sleeves and long pants while weed whacking for protection. A large brimmed hat fits right over the facemask holder on my head. Better to look a bit odd, than end up damaged with flying debris.

I have a John Deere weed whacker, but I don't think they make them anymore. It is a straight shaft, which the pros say is more powerfull than curved shaft models. This was a gift from husband, Landscapers model for real work, when he heard me cursing the old weed whacker that was so hard to start. That was the one my son abused so badly. This JD is a peach, easy one-pull to start, cuts about anything you aim it at. He takes care that my machines are easy to work with!!

Ruth0552
Jul. 23, 2011, 08:56 AM
I don't have this problem- probably because it's a smaller area and I have a pony. It does all the weed-whacking for me. I just mow around the edge and it looks great!

Tamara in TN
Jul. 23, 2011, 09:03 AM
What, nobody sets them on fire? We have a torch on a long handle that connects to a propane tank. I think it's called a 'weed dragon' though I'm not sure we have the name brand one.

Probably not the best idea if you're in a drought though. :)

over time heat weed killers like this damage the metal of the fence.

Tamara

Tamara in TN
Jul. 23, 2011, 09:04 AM
This:yes: I hate the dead grass look. It's also a good idea to be careful around your fence posts. Hitting the bottom of the posts repeatedly does damage them.

don't let it get that tall :)

Tamara

TheOtherHorse
Jul. 23, 2011, 09:56 AM
I spray the fence lines with ProDeuce from Southern States instead of RoundUp- it kills more, lasts longer, and is less expensive. To avoid the dead grass look I either spray it before the grass gets tall, or weed whip once first before spraying. The short grass/weeds dry up and crumble to just dirt.