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View Full Version : Wrong lead in test: Do you correct it, or let it go?



myhorsefaith
Jul. 19, 2011, 06:49 PM
As the title says.

Taking a horse to a schooling show (training level) on Saturday. She schools really well at home, but I'm not entirely sure how she'll be out.

I realize, in staring at these tests, that I'm not sure what to do IF she picks up the wrong lead.

With the horse's development in mind, I'd rather transition down and transition back up into the correct lead, but I'm not sure what is expected in a test at a show? I don't really care about our scores, I'm there to get her the experience. But I also want to make sure I do "the right thing" in the test, if that happened.

Thanks!

rizzodm
Jul. 19, 2011, 06:54 PM
Correct her. You don't want her to think anything goes just because she is off the ranch.

Sandy M
Jul. 19, 2011, 06:55 PM
Correct it, do not ignore.

appychik
Jul. 19, 2011, 06:59 PM
The judges I've scribed for always prefer the rider to correct the lead, or at least attempt to. Lets the judge know that you have the wrong lead and are trying to fix it. :)

Good luck at the show and have fun!

Gloria
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:03 PM
Always make the correctoin, if nothing else, so one bad movement will not negatively impact others.

I came back from a 1st level test where my horse fell to trot instead of working canter from lengthening. At the time, I did not have time to make the correction (meaning, go back to lengthening, show the transition to working canter, and then trot). That one bad movement cost me not only one 4 in one movement, but three 4s in three consecutive movements... Yuck

GreyDes
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:17 PM
As the others have said, correct it. The way the scoring works, if you don't correct it, the judge can technically give you a zero for the movement (because you never show the lead called for in the test). If you do correct it, you'll be marked down for the the transition, and a late canter depart, but it will likely still be a higher score than if you continue on the wrong lead.

Good luck! And remember, if you get the wrong lead now, just think how much easier counter-canter will be later! (at least that's what I keep telling myself... :))

Sandy M
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:26 PM
Good luck! And remember, if you get the wrong lead now, just think how much easier counter-canter will be later! (at least that's what I keep telling myself... :))

Be careful!! LOL!! My old horse got so comfortable in counter-canter that I had an awful time teaching him flying changes!

kinnip
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:29 PM
Definitely correct it. You'll still get something for performing the movement, even if it's late, usually a 4. If you don't correct it, you should get a 0 (not performed), though most judges will give a 1.

arabiansrock
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:30 PM
correct it! judge was kind to my son when he did his entire canter tour in his first level test on wrong lead, including the simple change that went from wrong lead to wrong lead! Trainer and I were bent over in hysterics cause she was reading and was YELLING the correct lead and he still never got it.

Judges comment: on wrong lead, still on wrong lead, STILL on wrong lead. Rider needs to learn leads:)

I don't remember if he got 4's or 2's on it, but it was a gift because it wasn't zero. He hasn't lived it down to this day. FWIW, this was before the mare knew counter canter and it was done quite nicely.

joiedevie99
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:37 PM
Think about it in terms of movements... normally the canter transition is one movement, then maybe a 20m circle is another movement, then the long side and down transition is a third movement. If you stay on the wrong lead, the judge will have to dock you in all three movements. If you fix it before the circle, you will only get docked in the first movement.

Also- I personally prefer to deal with any issue right at the moment in the ring rather than letting the ring be different than schooling at home. The last thing I want is for my horse to think I'm inconsistent in terms of what I permit and what I don't.

myhorsefaith
Jul. 19, 2011, 07:43 PM
Thank you all- great perspective and responses, I appreciate it!

SillyHorse
Jul. 19, 2011, 08:03 PM
correct it! judge was kind to my son when he did his entire canter tour in his first level test on wrong lead, including the simple change that went from wrong lead to wrong lead! Trainer and I were bent over in hysterics cause she was reading and was YELLING the correct lead and he still never got it.

Judges comment: on wrong lead, still on wrong lead, STILL on wrong lead. Rider needs to learn leads:)

I don't remember if he got 4's or 2's on it, but it was a gift because it wasn't zero. He hasn't lived it down to this day. FWIW, this was before the mare knew counter canter and it was done quite nicely.
Great story! :lol:

Dressage.For.Life.
Jul. 19, 2011, 10:05 PM
I've heard before that it's often preferred to attempt once to correct a wrong lead during a test, to show the judge that you are aware of it? But then to not cause a big issue in the ring thereafter, so not to further lower scores for upcoming movements?

netg
Jul. 20, 2011, 01:45 AM
I've heard before that it's often preferred to attempt once to correct a wrong lead during a test, to show the judge that you are aware of it? But then to not cause a big issue in the ring thereafter, so not to further lower scores for upcoming movements?

If you don't correct it, you are docked for every movement at the canter, not just one. You correct the lead.

Rhiannonjk
Jul. 20, 2011, 10:41 AM
Yeah, if you can't get it on the second try, you might be better to circle again, get dinged for being off-course, and then try the transition again.

sometimes an off-course error is less damaging than ruining one whole movement.

Janet
Jul. 20, 2011, 10:57 AM
I realize, in staring at these tests, that I'm not sure what to do IF she picks up the wrong lead.

With the horse's development in mind, I'd rather transition down and transition back up into the correct lead, but I'm not sure what is expected in a test at a show?
That IS "the right thing".

I have scored at least one (Second or Third Level) test in which the judge gave a "0" for an uncorrected incorrect lead.

I did at least one test with a greenie where, in spite of repeated re-attempts, we never did GET the correct lead on the circle. I don't remember what we got (probably a 2), but it wasn't 0. I happen to know the judge personally , and spoke to her about it later. She agreed that was the right thing to do.

Janet
Jul. 20, 2011, 11:00 AM
Yeah, if you can't get it on the second try, you might be better to circle again, get dinged for being off-course, and then try the transition again.

sometimes an off-course error is less damaging than ruining one whole movement.

Your score will be based on your first circle.

Even if your second circle is perfect, it won't do you any good on THAT score.

But it will allow you to start the NEXT movement (if it is at the canter) on the correct lead.

My informal observation, though, is that judges tend to look down on the practice.

myhorsefaith
Jul. 20, 2011, 11:00 AM
^That's a good point. I don't for-see this happening, but good to know.

Initially (like last month) she had initial anxiety/confusion over cantering when first learning. She has since gotten the hang of it - but who knows what the show environment will bring out. The show is traditionally very quiet and laid back, so I think everything will be fine. I'm not expecting her to revert back, but I know its in the realm of possibilities.

And honestly, because this is for HER, I'd rather help her get it right and get dinged for being off course. Its a schooling show, after all...right?!

alto
Jul. 20, 2011, 11:01 AM
Yes, transition down, rebalance & ask for the correct lead; same if canter breaks, it's important to rebalance & then pick up a nice canter rather than do a hurried transition.

Janet
Jul. 20, 2011, 11:02 AM
I've heard before that it's often preferred to attempt once to correct a wrong lead during a test, to show the judge that you are aware of it? But then to not cause a big issue in the ring thereafter, so not to further lower scores for upcoming movements?
You do not want to "cause a big issue in the ring", but you don't want to continue on the wrong lead either. If the "upcoming movements" are at the canter, you will be dinged repeatedly on eact one for being on the wrong lead.

Valentina_32926
Jul. 20, 2011, 11:36 AM
If you don't correct it you could get a ZERO for that movement since that lead was never shown.

Correct it.

mickeydoodle
Jul. 20, 2011, 12:28 PM
Great story! :lol:


I was calling a 4th level test for someone who did all the canter work on the wrong lead, including pirouettes, despite my yelling the correct lead over and over (score was in the 40's)

katarine
Jul. 20, 2011, 01:12 PM
Fix it, but stay on the test. If it calls for a 20m circle on the L lead at E then trot at E, do that. Even if you only get two strides of the L lead...finish your circle, transition to a trot and go on with your test.

arabiansrock
Jul. 20, 2011, 02:47 PM
counter canter pirouttes??? that sure beats my story, thats one talented horse@!

DancingAppy
Jul. 20, 2011, 03:51 PM
The right thing to do it correct it.

My one piece of advice, is if you get the incorrect lead is to calmly collect yourself, balance the horse, then correct it.

So many people when they get the wrong lead, freak out and immediately change leads only to cause the horse to get strung out.