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monalisa
Jul. 18, 2011, 06:23 AM
I have some fence lines that I need to replace on my farm (slowly turning this into a horse farm from a run-down cow farm). I have put quite a bit of four-board fence in and want to start steering away from it where I can. With a cribber and a horse that likes to kick the fence and break the boards in two, the maintenance is killing me.

What is out there besides four board that is horse friendly and safe? I do not want to use a hot fence of any kind nor do I want to use the white tape fences that you sometimes see. It needs to look nice and I don't mind spending money for quality.

Would love to see what is out there.

fordtraktor
Jul. 18, 2011, 08:07 AM
I personally do not think that any kind of fence is effective without hot attached to it somewhere. Your cribber would leave your 4 board alone, and your fighter would stop destroying your existing fence after a few good zaps. You don't even have to turn it on all that often, they just have to think it is there.

With that said, if you aren't going to do electric and are in the east, I would do no-climb with a board on top. In the west, pipe corrals. I would not consider Centaur or anything else really without juice, they do not respect it.

We have used a little of everything on our family farm. We've finally decided that for ease of use, installation, and horse friendliness, 5 strand coated wire with 2 electric is our favorite non-perimeter. In Indiana I have field fence for perimeter. I will replace with no-climb when it wears out. We are nearish to a highway so I must have something extremely sturdy.

monalisa
Jul. 18, 2011, 08:47 AM
I cannot do electric as it would cost me many thousands of dollars to fix it so that I could run electric out from the barn to the fence (it is not close). I have already looked into this. Money is tight. Just not in my budget to that anytime soon.

LauraKY
Jul. 18, 2011, 08:57 AM
Electric doesn't have to be expensive. A solar charger is less than $200 for a 10 miler. We're starting to put up interior fences (all the perimeter fencing is board). I'm starting with hot tape, but will be putting in Ramm fence type vinyl with a hot rail on the top.

Or, there's always V-Mesh with a sight board. But, I still run electric along the top.

horsetales
Jul. 18, 2011, 09:17 AM
Electric doesn't have to be expensive. A solar charger is less than $200 for a 10 miler. We're starting to put up interior fences (all the perimeter fencing is board). I'm starting with hot tape, but will be putting in Ramm fence type vinyl with a hot rail on the top.

Or, there's always V-Mesh with a sight board. But, I still run electric along the top.

Agree- solar is very affordable and effective. We use solar with coated wire (2 strands hot, 2 not). My cribber leaves it alone and all others are very respectful. Otherwise no climb would be the next best option

SMF11
Jul. 18, 2011, 10:43 AM
I have no climb with a board on top. Around here it is cheaper than four board fencing, but more expensive than three board. I do not use hot wire at all and the horses leave the fence alone. However, my pastures are large (for here! -- between 3 and 15 acres).

wsmoak
Jul. 18, 2011, 10:50 AM
If you want to stay away from wood entirely, you can do no-climb or v-mesh fencing on metal posts with a metal top rail. (I'm thinking round metal posts, not T-posts.)

I do think wire needs a top rail, both for visibility and to keep the fence stable. When you stretch the wire it *will* pull on the corner posts, even if they are well braced.

You can either do chain-link style rails where they fit together, or else weld them. Or, skip the wire and just do pipe rails. This is common out west both for fences and open-style barns.

This isn't likely to be cheap up front, but there's virtually no maintenance once it's done. (Well, at least until somebody bends one of the posts or rails!)

mronthebit
Jul. 18, 2011, 10:59 AM
I agree with the other posters. We have upwards of 20,000 feet of four board fence plus some no-climb; one hot wire along the top board cuts maintenance 80% and cost roughly 0.15 per foot, insulators and charger(s) included.

There are some excellent solar chargers out there for $ 200-300 that will handle a mile or more of triple strand poly tape or several miles of single strand wire at 5000 V or more.

TIMCOHorseandFarm
Jul. 18, 2011, 12:01 PM
I think for that distance I would get away from an all in one solar unit. Those are convenient, but not always as powerful. They have some great stand alone panels and units that are really reliable and cover a great distance. You might pay $400 instead of $300, but to be able to have a super powerful solar unit with a solid battery back up would help me sleep better. We swap out so many solar units that people buy and then realize they aren't powerful enough every month that I say go bigger if you can.

Nes
Jul. 18, 2011, 12:04 PM
We're changing from Post & Field wire (cow wire) to Post & No-climb with electric.

We did electric around 4acres for under $400 including insulators, wire, & the charger. Lots of people sell used electric chargers when they upgrade to a bigger one, if you've just got horses you don't need TO big a jolt to keep them off the fence.

tangledweb
Jul. 18, 2011, 12:05 PM
I cannot do electric as it would cost me many thousands of dollars to fix it so that I could run electric out from the barn to the fence (it is not close). I have already looked into this. Money is tight. Just not in my budget to that anytime soon.

If your horses are wrecking fences I don't think you can afford not to put a hot wire along them.

A solar setup will not cost that much and will start paying you back in reduced repairs very quickly.

sschuessler
Jul. 18, 2011, 12:25 PM
I agree with everyone else-- solar powered hot wire with a 3 or 4 board fence. We have a 3-board (and in some places a higher 2 board) with 2 strands of hot wire running about 6 inches inside of the fence. Stops all (but one) of the horses from destroying the fence. The one that still destroys only does it when the wire is off--and he tests it with his whiskers daily to see if it is on or off.

suz
Jul. 18, 2011, 01:37 PM
i've got steep, ledgy and heavily treed mountainside and i'm replacing my rotten wood fencing with woven wire and t posts, and will weave rubber strap fencing through the top and bottom. the rubber strap fenceing is uncommon, but i think will be a tremendous product here; it has a fab tensile strength and does not rot or break.
it's not expensive, but dang the shipping is ridiculous!
i may hire someone with a truck to go get it from nc for me, or i'll go do it myself.
this set up should last for twenty or more years with routine maintainance.
i'm psyched about it!

monalisa
Jul. 18, 2011, 08:31 PM
One more question, if I used the Ramm horse fence, with a board on top, plus hot wire with a solar panel, is it about the same in cost as four-board?

I am convinced thanks to everyone that I need to hot wire my fence with solar panels. But given that I will do that, would you do four board (which is what I already have that I have put in) or would you do the Ramm with a board on top?

Thanks for the input, very helpful.

DressageFancy
Jul. 18, 2011, 09:08 PM
i've got steep, ledgy and heavily treed mountainside and i'm replacing my rotten wood fencing with woven wire and t posts, and will weave rubber strap fencing through the top and bottom. the rubber strap fenceing is uncommon, but i think will be a tremendous product here; it has a fab tensile strength and does not rot or break.
it's not expensive, but dang the shipping is ridiculous!
i may hire someone with a truck to go get it from nc for me, or i'll go do it myself.
this set up should last for twenty or more years with routine maintainance.
i'm psyched about it!

Just make sure that the rubber strap does not unravel it's nylon interior strings. I had a neighbor use this kind of fencing only to loose a broodmare to impaction/colic that was caused by her having eaten some of the nylon string and having it get all tangled in her gut (she was posted after death). After that happened he walked the fence a couple times a year with a hand held torch and burned off any unraveled string that worked it's way out of the fenceing.

clanter
Jul. 18, 2011, 09:43 PM
v-mesh fencing on metal posts with a metal top rail. (I'm thinking round metal posts, not T-posts.)

This what we have along the front ... its been up 20 years without anything being done... there are places near use that the same combination has been on place fifty years.

Post are drill stem, top rail is 2" sch 40 round pipe; posts are notched so the top rail lays in a saddle then welded... if you have very long runs have slip sleeve every 400 to 500 ft so the pipe can expand

hosspuller
Jul. 19, 2011, 12:33 AM
Is any part of the fence close to the house or any building with electricity? Think outside of the barn. An electric fence only needs to be close ... fifty feet is close enough for an underground hot wire. Then Zap !! to a horse pushing a fence. Bad horse !! They learn quick.

MunchkinsMom
Jul. 19, 2011, 01:03 AM
There is a product called LifeTime Lumber, the O'Connor's installed it at The Oaks here in Florida. My fence painter was raving about it (he did the painting), said it was great stuff, and he even had a piece that he showed me. Said it installs like lumber, but is much stronger and more durable than wood. Here's a link to their website:

http://www.lifetimelumber.com/equine-fencing.php

poltroon
Jul. 19, 2011, 01:29 AM
I am using no-climb with a RAMM (like centaur) flex rail at the top. The top rail is 5' and is holding up really well.

I am having an issue with one section of my no-climb getting battered by my mare using it as a rubbing post. I ran a section of electric tape along it at butt level which seems to help. It probably wouldn't be a problem except that this fence line ended up being used from both sides.

BasqueMom
Jul. 19, 2011, 01:41 AM
The Lifetime Lumber is really nice stuff--got samples, but the price was way beyond what our customers will pay.

Flexible rail such as Centaur or Ramm will cost about the same as board or maybe just a tad more. Both require bracing for the corners and end/gate posts. No maintainance (painting), rotting, etc. Centaur has an electric version with one edge of the rail--most folks use it for a top rail. Tis pricey, however.

Very few horses crib on the flexible rail...they may turn to the top of the posts or the gates. Some folks mix up the rail with coated wire, either electric or non-electric.

Good solar chargers are not cheap and solar panels are continually rising in price. We don't even post the prices because we have to check with our supplier with each order. The more joules the better, get one with a battery backup.

2DogsFarm
Jul. 19, 2011, 06:59 AM
I have the flexible rail as a top rail with 3 lines of coated wire beneath.
The top wire could carry a charge, but so far I haven't needed to make it hot.

After 7 years the fencing has needed just one wire replaced when horses grazing through it broke the wire.
Would not have happened if I'd run a charger on the fenceline.
I have not even needed to retension yet, although one line - middle one - could use it - not sagging, just not pianowire tight anymore.

I'd have to check the invoice, but I believe it is the RAMM product or another Centaur clone.

I ran the wire on 6" round posts, corner posts are larger diameter.
Fencing was put up by pros, I had neither time nor knowledge to do myself.

If I wanted to redo anything I might use the electrobraid product.
A friend & her husband did this themselves & reported it was easy to work with. Looks a helluva lot better than tape too.

suz
Jul. 19, 2011, 11:41 AM
Just make sure that the rubber strap does not unravel it's nylon interior strings. I had a neighbor use this kind of fencing only to loose a broodmare to impaction/colic that was caused by her having eaten some of the nylon string and having it get all tangled in her gut (she was posted after death). After that happened he walked the fence a couple times a year with a hand held torch and burned off any unraveled string that worked it's way out of the fenceing.

excellent advice, thanks so much!

artsmom
Jul. 19, 2011, 11:49 AM
We got Ramm Flex fence and love it. It ended up costing us less than board and looks great. It went up fairly well (harder to install in cold weather) and has been a breeze with maintenance.

monalisa
Jul. 19, 2011, 01:13 PM
I am not inclined to use any type of white fencing - just won't look good with what I have in place already. Not opposed to using wood as a top board with a RAMM mesh fence below (or a no climb, something like that). I just want it to look nice 5 years from now and hold up.

poltroon
Jul. 19, 2011, 02:56 PM
My Ramm flex fence is in black, and it still looks great with 0 attention after 6 years.

LauraKY
Jul. 19, 2011, 03:57 PM
Ramm fence (or similar manufacters) approximate the look of board fence. You don't need a board on the top.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 20, 2011, 01:05 PM
I *heart* Ramm/Centaur "board" fence. *sigh*

My second choice is coated wire. At least 5 strands with two hot.

But if I were you I would run an electric wire along the top and second from bottom wood board with a good solar charger or battery powered charger (someone was talking about marine batteries at some point) and just zap the heck out of those guys and keep your existing fence. Put it on extenders on the lower board so they don't feel tempted to get close enough to crib anything.

MunchkinsMom
Jul. 20, 2011, 11:33 PM
You could install this for the cribber, won't help with the fence kicker.

http://www.horsecribbingspikes.com/