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View Full Version : What are teenaged midlevel dressage horses going for?



Petstorejunkie
Jul. 13, 2011, 09:12 PM
looking on the normal sites like warmbloods for sale etc brings prices all across the boards... and lots with incorrect balance.

let's say solid 2nd level with decent local scores, low mid teens 16ish hands, wb with recognizable daddy, gelding. travels, trails, low jumps too.

Arathita
Jul. 13, 2011, 09:37 PM
This is hard to say as there are many things not mentioned here.

I would believe 10-40K dollars. If you can guarantee a good home forever you may aqcuire a wonderful low-mid teen horse for little if anything.

TickleFight
Jul. 13, 2011, 09:59 PM
I think 10-40k is a pretty reasonable range. The horses closer to 40 will likely be younger with talent to move beyond 2nd level, or may be solidly beyond that level when you buy them.

Those closer to 10 will likely be on the older side, less talented, and may be more likely to have soundness issues. But you may get lucky and find a diamond in the rough.

Based on your information given, I think you could pretty easily find a suitable horse for 15-20k.

Good luck!

GreyStreet
Jul. 13, 2011, 10:05 PM
Wow, then I got an excellent deal on my mare! ;) Though she is a mare and a bit older than your criteria, but still meets the rest of your list. I tend to agree with TickleFight's description, though, for your list.

2tempe
Jul. 14, 2011, 01:11 PM
I just looked thru the ads on Dressage Daily's Horse Market; there are many listed under 30k, if you weed through them, you will see some interesting horses that are generally what you are looking for. I have bought two horses off this site (one was a 15 yr old PSG schoolmaster, just over $20k TB to a good home- I still have him @ 21, but he is now leased out to lower level rider. He is the BEST MONEY ever spent) Looked at several others; my experience is that all were pretty much what was described. One was a very nice mare to ride, her ground manners and attitude were a deal breaker; One was sound and lovely but OCD lesion showed up on xray. One was young and lovely but I decided not to buy one that was that green (which I knew from the ad).

chancellor2
Jul. 14, 2011, 01:15 PM
I have one of those for sale for 10k.

TrakHack
Jul. 14, 2011, 01:26 PM
Agree with $15k-$20k based on my research.

I went older (early 20s) and didn't recognize the breeding of my gelding (he is registered, but his sire was born over I decade before I was) but otherwise my horse was everything you described and gorgeously handsome to boot. I got him for a very very low price two years ago.

My guy looks great and regularly passes for a horse in his mid teens (he's 24 now).

TickleFight
Jul. 14, 2011, 03:06 PM
Does the horse have to be a warmblood? Whatever your budget is it will go farther with an "off" breed, so you may not want to ignore the thoroughbreds etc.

Here's an example: this horse is an 11 year old quarter horse gelding. He is 16h, has shown 4th and is schooling PSG, and looks pretty nice on his video. I don't know how familiar you are with quarter horses, but on average they are incredibly kind, generous, and even tempered.

I think he seems like a lot of horse for the money... probably more than you would get in a warmblood of the same price.

http://www.dressagedaily.com/index.php?option=com_mtree&task=viewlink&link_id=3229&Itemid=335

smokygirl
Jul. 14, 2011, 03:38 PM
That is a nice QH. lot of tb in his background, and one would definetely want to check HYPP status (didnt see it in the ad), but very nice.

Petstorejunkie
Jul. 14, 2011, 03:56 PM
Ya'll are so sweet to help, but I'm not in the market to buy. I'm training up what is described in the OP; seeing as how I'm an ammy helping out a friend, I don't have my finger on the pulse of the market.
I hope that wasn't against the rules, this isn't an ad :confused:

Kyzteke
Jul. 14, 2011, 04:01 PM
One was young and lovely but I decided not to buy one that was that green (which I knew from the ad).

I don't understand -- how can a horse be "solid 2nd Level" (which is what the OP is looking for) and still be green?

Velvet
Jul. 14, 2011, 04:28 PM
Ya'll are so sweet to help, but I'm not in the market to buy. I'm training up what is described in the OP; seeing as how I'm an ammy helping out a friend, I don't have my finger on the pulse of the market.
I hope that wasn't against the rules, this isn't an ad :confused:

:lol: Your attempt at obfuscation worked a little too well! :lol: I don't think it sounded like an ad...and obviously no one else did either. :yes:

Wayside
Jul. 14, 2011, 06:36 PM
I think you've probably gotten good advice so far, but I'd like to add that how easy the horse is will also make a big difference in his price and how easy he is to sell, especially when you're talking about a horse in his teens or one that's not very fancy.

If he's a real steady-eddie type, straightforward and uncomplicated without being overly dull it will be easier to justify a higher price than if he's quirky or neurotic.

2tempe
Jul. 14, 2011, 08:37 PM
I don't understand -- how can a horse be "solid 2nd Level" (which is what the OP is looking for) and still be green?

Sorry if I wasn't clear; I was describing several of the horses I looked at from dressage daily site, not ones that she (or whoever) would want to consider.

J-Lu
Jul. 15, 2011, 01:01 AM
For what the OP described, I agree with Arathita. $10-40K.

The OP mentioned a warmblood, with recognizable parents, solid second level (meaning it's schooling at least upper third, maybe alot higher), and significant show experience to make it calmer at shows (trailering, etc.).

That's often closer to the $40K than the $10K these days. You're paying for the horse who has experience and a solid show career through second level (meaning likely showing at third, maybe fourth or higher).

Early teens who maxed out at PSG and is schoolmaster-type - closer to $40K. Hothead with lameness or trainability issues with uber talent but no real record above second level due to injuries or trainability issues (and in mid teens, as OP suggested)? Problem. Well bred horses with mediocre talent who likely won't go comfortably above third level? Closer to 10-15K these days.

The training of a "well bred horse who is solid at second level" is also of importance here. How solid is solid?

Yes, a nonwarmblood might cost less but that's not what the OP is asking about.