PDA

View Full Version : Why is it so hard to change?



eponacelt
Jul. 6, 2011, 07:29 AM
I had a lesson last night (which went well...introducing new concepts to the relatively green, but not overly young horse) and I started to feel bad for my poor, long-suffering trainer. She has to continually tell me certain things over and over again - look up, sit back in the saddle, shoulders back.

I work hard at my riding and I take her instruction to heart. I really do! I tell myself to do these things when she's not around, and my husband will even get on my case about it on her behalf. I am truly dedicated to getting better! So why then is it so hard to just LOOK UP?!? Putting my shoulders back, and some of the sitting back in the saddle is 25 years of muscle memory that has to be overcome, but it just feels like I should be able to make this a mind-over-matter issue. Yet I continue to struggle with it. I've made some progress in the past year for sure, but this isn't a strength issue for me, nor is it physically HARD to look up or put my shoulders back.

Any suggestions for overcoming the "easy" problems in yourself?

Lost_at_C
Jul. 6, 2011, 07:49 AM
I still drop my head as a result of having no ground person for a long long time. I have to force myself to bring my neck up and back, and as soon as I start concentrating on other things it's gone again. It is really really difficult to change the habits of a lifetime. Having said that, it sounds like you might be being too hard on yourself. If you turn something like this into a serious task you tend to introduce more tension and frustration. I'd suggest focusing on visualization and maybe do some yoga in between to give you a new sense of balance and posture.

AllWeatherGal
Jul. 6, 2011, 09:04 AM
I started to feel bad for my poor, long-suffering trainer. She has to continually tell me certain things over and over again - look up, sit back in the saddle, shoulders back.
<snip>
and some of the sitting back in the saddle is 25 years of muscle memory that has to be overcome, but it just feels like I should be able to make this a mind-over-matter issue.

25 years of habit is quite a lot to overcome and you're doing yourself a disservice by minimizing the progress you've made. Or, if you were ME that's what would be happening :yes:

Your long-suffering trainer probably appreciates your commitment to improvement and your sympathy for her, but if she's like my trainer, she'll remind you that's why she's got a job.

Too many of us have a misguided idea that we can mind-over-matter anything. It takes a LOT of practice to develop that skill. Daily practice. For many years.

Consider that you might mind-over-matter your worry. How much more mind would you have available for body control if it wasn't distracted by your frustration? In fact, according to some methodologies, (rational-emotive behavioral therapy), you are actually clinging to the old by worrying so much about it.

How's that for Too Much Thinking?

In short, you're on the right path. Be a little more patient with yourself. In fact, be as patient with yourself as you are with your horse.

dudleyc
Jul. 6, 2011, 09:14 AM
If part of what you want to fix involves muscle memory - it will take a lot of concentrated relearning.

I ride weekly with Lendon Gray and then hang and watch the other lessons. Lendon is really interested in TEACHING and how to teach effectively. She once told me that when she was riding that she was a really good student because she couldn't stand to be told the same thing twice.

ultimateshowmom
Jul. 6, 2011, 09:38 AM
As a new rider to dressage and not having much instruction with riding before that, I have to say that it has helped that my trainer tells me HOW my movements affect my horse. It is amazing that a hip moved or shoulder brought back can completely change my horses stride etc. Personally that makes me learn to correct things much quicker- because I see the results in the horse. Maybe ask your trainer to give more details, if she knows the mechanics.

CFFarm
Jul. 6, 2011, 09:51 AM
Riding, like any physical art form, takes the ability to use various parts of the body in a separate path but in harmony with the whole. Does that make sense? It's hard to put into words. When I teach I have my students silently start at the top of their head and work their way down through their body to the heels, checking for alignment and postition, throughout the lesson. It becomes something you do almost unconciously as you progress to working more on the horse's position than your own. You also learn that when your postition is good the horse moves better. Don't worry, your instructor knows what you are going through.

pryme_thyme
Jul. 6, 2011, 11:49 AM
I have a similiar issue.... I am a born and bred hunter rider :lol: and I have recently attempted learning and competing dressage.

I constantly want to revert back to my hunt seat position rather than sitting back and deep. And I tend to brace my hip when I sit deep, it is not just comfrotable for me yet.

My coach taught me a little trick since I had your same problem. Make up a one or three word phrase and keep saying it to yourself while riding.

Mine was "deep and relaxed".

Works for me!

naturalequus
Jul. 6, 2011, 01:04 PM
I agree with much of the above posts. It takes a LONG time to effect a change, especially in an established habit. A couple months ago I attended a Greg Best clinic - I'm sure Greg thought (at least at one point) that I was just ignoring him and intent on my own thing as he sent us over fences, because throughout the clinic I kept doing the exact. same. thing(s) wrong (arg! :mad:). In reality, I was trying REALLY HARD to do as he said, but just wasn't sure exactly how to effect the change I wanted, and I was struggling against habits I had inadvertently formed. By the finish of the clinic I FINALLY got it all together but taking that all home now, I still make mistakes and revert back to the old ways at times! You can't stress about it, you just have to relax and sink into the flow. There is a lot to remember and focus on when you're riding, so sometimes something slips as you focus on another area. Then you fix the slipping issue and something else slips because your attention is not on it. As you develop and grow and become better at each of those individual 'slips' or 'areas of issue', you get better at those individual tasks and they become more and more habitual and require less specific individual focus - they become second-nature to the point where you no longer have to think about it, it just happens (correctly). You develop new habits that at first maybe only occur successfully 10 percent of your ride, then maybe 20, then 50, and soon the issue is no longer an issue and you can focus on something else ;) Just keep plugging away at it, and certainly don't diminish the progress you have already made! You are forming new mental and physical (muscle memory) habits and that takes time - just pick at it over time and gradually the bad habits will disappear as a result of your hard work.


As a new rider to dressage and not having much instruction with riding before that, I have to say that it has helped that my trainer tells me HOW my movements affect my horse. It is amazing that a hip moved or shoulder brought back can completely change my horses stride etc. Personally that makes me learn to correct things much quicker- because I see the results in the horse. Maybe ask your trainer to give more details, if she knows the mechanics.

This really helps me. When I am able to see how it affects my horse, I can then see and correct it much easier!

CatPS
Jul. 6, 2011, 01:25 PM
Also remember that a good trainer will push you to improve every single ride, so it is possible that you have already made much more progress than you realize! I had a similar feeling of discouragement just recently and brought it up with my trainer, who pointed out that it wasn't that I had not improved, but that I had advanced to the point that she was expecting more of me now. I'd advise you to just keep plugging away... and if you are feeling discouraged, do not hesitate to tell your trainer how you are feeling. He/she may have some very positive things to say that will make you feel much better ;)

TheHotSensitiveType
Jul. 6, 2011, 01:26 PM
For the looking down, get a horse that is much more likely to spook if you are not watching where you are going. Horse has me so trained now that I get told by instructor to look down once in a while :). Sometimes you just can't win.

In all seriousness though, imagine yourself riding a 20 meter circle at the walk/trot/canter. Close your eyes if it helps (I have too). Where are your shoulders? Are you tipped too far forward or are you shoulders nicely above your hips? Where are your eyes looking? Do you see your horse's neck/poll or do you see where you are going? Where is your rear? Mentally correct the image. Do this often during the day.

It is hard re-training habits. If it were easy, we would all be text book perfect riders.

Isabeau Z Solace
Jul. 6, 2011, 02:03 PM
OP -

Pick up a copy of the book The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle.

It explains how the brain forms "skill" physiologically, why "deep practice" is better than rote repetition, how "primal cues" result in "ignition" (passion, and the energy to pursue a goal) and a bunch of other fantastic stuff.

You probably don't need more 'riding' lessons so much as you need more understanding of how the human brain functions, how if create's new skills, and improves those skills.

IdahoRider
Jul. 6, 2011, 02:29 PM
I ride weekly with Lendon Gray and then hang and watch the other lessons.
I am so very, very envious! I love my instructor, and appreciate how patient she has been with me. But I would love to take lessons from someone like Lendon.
Sheilah

angel
Jul. 7, 2011, 08:59 AM
Part of the problem has to do with muscle memory...yes, old habits die hard. But, a portion of your problem has to do with uncorrected flaws in your balance that your teacher is not addressing. Our bodies seek to keep us from toppling over, so when we are incorrectly balanced, all sorts of errors creep in so that we do not fall.

Probably my favorites thoughts come from Sally Swift, and her concept of "hard eyes" and "soft eyes." The hard eyes come when we focus on something close at hand, which means our horses's ears. When concentrate on one, small area, it prevents us from actually feeling what our bodies are doing. The soft eyes refers to looking out to the horizon such that we can see as much of the distance as possible. This then makes it easier to think about what our bodies are doing up there and allows us to begin feeling the incorrectness by thinking about one area of our body at a time.

You can best start the process in walk with your legs hanging out of the stirrups. Bend your knees slightly and lift your toes. Feel your shoulder blades. Feel where they are in relationship to your spine. Turn your horse, this way and that, by only using the rotation of your torso. Keep your hands still, and your reins fairly long. Expand your chest. Hold your breathe and see what happens. Feel the shoulders, and feel what the horse does. Breathe out. Don't forget to look at the horizon. This is only the beginning of body awareness. Yoga or pilates also help the awareness process, though if you are good, you can learn it completely on the horse.

Tie a roll of toilet paper under your chin to help you remember the "soft eyes."

CFFarm
Jul. 8, 2011, 10:27 AM
As for looking down it seems to be something all dressage riders do, even top trainers. They seem to be looking at the back of the horses head, poll area, more than actually looking down. I think riders are trying to see inside the horse's brain.:lol: This seems to be something we all need to remind ourselves of.

esdressage
Jul. 8, 2011, 10:55 AM
Tie a roll of toilet paper under your chin to help you remember the "soft eyes."

May we have a photo of this so that we can see exactly how do do it? :lol:

All joking aside, Sally Swift is really wonderful for this type of thing. I think I'll re-read Centered Riding while I'm on vacation next week! :)

Big_Grey_hunter
Jul. 8, 2011, 11:01 AM
Stick a piece of tape across the back of your neck hairs while looking up. If you try to look down, it yanks on the sensitive, fine hairs on your neck. This bit of tug can remind you to keep your eyes up. It's not a permanent fix, but its an excellent reminder and builds the habit of looking up. Alternatively, you can tie a piece of sewing thread from helmet to the back of your collar. Again, the little tug serves as a reminder, allowing you to build muscle memory and habit while focusing on other things.

Both of these methods are safe, as in the case of a fall, trip, or stuble, they will easily break.

dressagediosa
Jul. 8, 2011, 11:27 AM
Stick a piece of tape across the back of your neck hairs while looking up. If you try to look down, it yanks on the sensitive, fine hairs on your neck. This bit of tug can remind you to keep your eyes up. It's not a permanent fix, but its an excellent reminder and builds the habit of looking up. Alternatively, you can tie a piece of sewing thread from helmet to the back of your collar. Again, the little tug serves as a reminder, allowing you to build muscle memory and habit while focusing on other things.

Both of these methods are safe, as in the case of a fall, trip, or stuble, they will easily break.

Just for the record, eponacelt, your trainer adores you, and does not consider herself suffering in anyway; moreover, she loves your desire to change, but does not feel that the above-mentioned pulling out of anyone's hair - hers, yours, or otherwise - is a necessary part of training. ;) I'm gonna remember this for students I like less, though! :D hah!

TheHorseProblem
Jul. 8, 2011, 11:44 AM
I recently reached a low point in my riding as well. My issue has to do with fear. To make matters worse, my horse suddenly became very spooky, and I got really concerned that my own spookiness would harm him--that I would confirm his fears and end up with an unrideable horse.

Jane Savoie wrote a book called That Winning Feeling. I have had it for a long time, but never cracked it, as I was horseless on and off for a couple of years. Anyway, it is really helping me resolve some of these issues. For me it is fear, but the techniques of meditation, relaxation, and imaging have made a huge difference for me lately. Of course, as a nervous rider, I am always looking down so I can spook first :lol: so to counteract that, in my mind, I picture myself going around, head up, soft seat and hands. It takes some concentration, but I try to imagine cantering every stride around the ring.

Also, many years ago, a new age-y friend was helping me overcome my doubts about whether I could go to university. She suggested a Bible-based formula of 70 X 7 (supposedly that is how many times Jesus said to forgive someone or something like that--where's Western when you need him/her?) I wrote down the 10 reasons why I could not go to college. Then she helped me turn these statements into positives, and my assignment was to write each one 70 X 7 times. I got my B.A. from the University of California before I ever finished writing them.

So I am applying this principle to my riding. I wrote down my worst faults, all of which are rooted in my anxiety--gripping, not rewarding my horse, looking down, giving mixed signals--and wrote an affirmation to counteract it. I work on the writing part a little bit every day.

Doing this has made me realize that I know how to ride. Every lesson, every correction, every wise word I've ever read is all in there. I have, at some point and in some ride, applied all this wisdom and ridden well. It just needs to become a part of me in a deeper way.

One of my biggest excuses is that I learned to ride as an adult; I will never be as good as someone who grew up on the back of a horse. So, there was a woman (mid-thirties maybe) at our barn the other day trying out a GP sale horse with her BNT at her side. I watched her ride this horse over a 5' oxer, then later, overheard her telling someone that she learned to ride as an adult. You would never know that to watch her ride, supple and fearless. So this just confirms for me that my limitations are all between my ears.

I am really curious about The Talent Code!

Isabeau Z Solace
Jul. 8, 2011, 02:19 PM
I am really curious about The Talent Code!

It is not long or difficult, but the concepts are fantastic. Get it. Read it. Now !!:D

Gracie
Jul. 8, 2011, 02:26 PM
I wrote down the 10 reasons why I could not go to college. Then she helped me turn these statements into positives, and my assignment was to write each one 70 X 7 times. I got my B.A. from the University of California before I ever finished writing them.

This exercise really impressed me. I can apply it to anything I'm working on or frustrated with or just need focus.

eponacelt
Jul. 8, 2011, 08:41 PM
Just for the record, eponacelt, your trainer adores you, and does not consider herself suffering in anyway; moreover, she loves your desire to change, but does not feel that the above-mentioned pulling out of anyone's hair - hers, yours, or otherwise - is a necessary part of training. ;) I'm gonna remember this for students I like less, though! :D hah!

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

I just don't know how you an possibly stand telling me to look up 20 times or more in 45 minutes! :D

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Jul. 9, 2011, 05:13 PM
if she has to tell you less than once every 2 minutes, sounds like you are doing well at making the change! 2 minutes is almost half of a training level dressage test - if you're reminded at the ingate, hold it for half the test, and then need to be reminded again, that's great!!

I find when I am first making a physical change, I need to remind myself to check and correct it at least every time I pass an arena letter. Eventually I just need to check /fix it going into corners, and then it starts holding long enough that I only need to check every couple of movements.

Step by step the longest march can be done...

GreyStreet
Jul. 9, 2011, 11:44 PM
I think struggling with change is an inevitable part of the journey. As with anything, I think we make great leaps in our riding, then often plateau (or feel like we have) before making progress. There's a reason for that old two steps forward, one step back adage.

I'm struggling with change myself - I tend to be a bit crooked and especially love to weight my right seat bone more heavily. I've had to really start being more aware of the weight I am placing in both seat bones and even feel how I'm weighting my stirrups. Right now it has to be a very conscious thing. But, when I get frustrated about my progress, I have to take a step back and consider the big picture. It's pretty cool to be able to start breaking down the nuances of how something so minute as a small shift in weight can influence my horse's way of going.

Concepts that used to seem light years away I am now able to implement in my riding, and just to be schooling things that used to seem so difficult to unlock is pretty great. If you're super type A about your riding (as a lot of dressage riders tend to be, including myself!) then it's easy to get caught up in the frustrations because we want to be able to do ALL things right, right NOW, and that's just not possible. I bet if you were to look back at your riding a year ago and compare to today, you would see major differences.

I am pretty humbled by how little I REALLY know and how far I still have to go in this journey, but I'm pretty excited about the prospect. If you had told me last year at this time that I'd be showing Second Level, I probably would have laughed. Don't underestimate dedication and hard work.

carolprudm
Jul. 10, 2011, 09:55 AM
First, think "LOOK UP", not "Don't look down" Lose the negative, one of the best lessons I learned from Jane Savoie's books

Second, ride off the rail (Don't:eek: cruise the rail all the time) Ride the quarter lines, center line, short diagonals, long diagonals,circles etc. Be precise. If you don't have markers pick a fence post or whatever. Gotta say I am really enjoying my new arena, flat, level with markers

Go SOMEWHERE, with intent. Count strides. The second half of the circle should have as many strides as the first half. Thanks for that one LA:)

At first, concentrate on steering, not transitions. At least for me, I tend to drop my head in transitions, to see if Sophie is tossing her head Yup, she is:eek:

carolprudm
Jul. 10, 2011, 10:05 AM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110713256880&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1123

CFFarm
Jul. 10, 2011, 12:04 PM
There is a reason the classical schools keep their riders on the longe for so long. Position becomes second nature.

Stellar_moves
Jul. 10, 2011, 12:07 PM
Bad habits die hard... I've been riding for 10 years and was never told to keep my toes pointed in while my heels were down. Not once! I took a lesson with another girl from my barn just to get a different opinion equitation wise and she totally opened my eyes to things.. It's hard to keep those toes pointed in while your heels are down! It's painful! She also is always reminding me to keep my hands up, wrists straight, and to not cross my hand over my horses neck. It's only been about two weeks, but she has helped so much. It's going to take some time to kill my old habits but better late then never I presume!

Justa Bob
Jul. 10, 2011, 12:18 PM
Denny Emerson has a great section in his new book that addresses bad habits and how to change them (Chp 6, Ambushed by "Wrong Basics"). One really interesting point is that some habits are based on instinct/survival.

Equibrit
Jul. 10, 2011, 12:26 PM
Do those things in the rest of your life. Sit up in the car, office chair, eating at the table, watching tv, etc etc. Look up and put shoulders back whenever you are walking sitting, running etc. All of these things will improve your body and ability to do the most common of tasks. In other words; police yourself ALL the time. The trick is to allow your body to balance and control itself without the use of your eyes. The instant you move that big heavy blob on your shoulders you have compromised your balance.

carolprudm
Jul. 11, 2011, 08:43 AM
Do those things in the rest of your life. Sit up in the car, office chair, eating at the table, watching tv, etc etc. Look up and put shoulders back whenever you are walking sitting, running etc. All of these things will improve your body and ability to do the most common of tasks. In other words; police yourself ALL the time. The trick is to allow your body to balance and control itself without the use of your eyes. The instant you move that big heavy blob on your shoulders you have compromised your balance.
FWIW I think my posture has improved since I started wearing Sketcher Shape ups

Vesper Sparrow
Jul. 11, 2011, 10:32 AM
I do find it's easier changing something if it's a matter of survival. When things go south, in my brain, I can hear my trainer shouting "sit up!" and I generally do.

My longstanding bete noire is using the inside rein too much, particularly in a critical situation when you're worried that the horse won't listen to your outside one, so you grasp at that inside one. I had it almost conquered on my gelding because when I did it he would stick his shoulder out, drift outside or sometimes even trip. He is on lay-up at the moment and I'm riding a much more forgiving mare, so I'm back to my old bad habits.

Kolsch
Jul. 12, 2011, 07:22 PM
OP -

Pick up a copy of the book The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle.

It explains how the brain forms "skill" physiologically, why "deep practice" is better than rote repetition, how "primal cues" result in "ignition" (passion, and the energy to pursue a goal) and a bunch of other fantastic stuff.

You probably don't need more 'riding' lessons so much as you need more understanding of how the human brain functions, how if create's new skills, and improves those skills.

I second this.

swgarasu
Jul. 21, 2011, 12:37 AM
I recommend taking a video of yourself and watching it, and watch a few times over a few days. I am usually really mortified, and thus really motivated, to work harder and think more often about bad habits. Additionally, it will show you exactly where you are wrong. What you feel and what you hear when you are riding still cannot give you the same kind of information about your situation that a video does- when I see it for myself, it clicks into my head about what exactly is wrong about my position. "Oh, look up!" She is saying that because I am hunching my shoulders, and sticking my chin out. I don't just need to lift my eyes or my head- I need to straighten my torso and open my chest and bring my chin in... etc.

eponacelt
Jul. 21, 2011, 09:43 AM
I recommend taking a video of yourself and watching it, and watch a few times over a few days. I am usually really mortified, and thus really motivated, to work harder and think more often about bad habits. Additionally, it will show you exactly where you are wrong. What you feel and what you hear when you are riding still cannot give you the same kind of information about your situation that a video does- when I see it for myself, it clicks into my head about what exactly is wrong about my position. "Oh, look up!" She is saying that because I am hunching my shoulders, and sticking my chin out. I don't just need to lift my eyes or my head- I need to straighten my torso and open my chest and bring my chin in... etc.

Actually, I do this quite frequently. I'm very lucky that Mr. eponacelt frequently comes with me to lessons and is more than happy to video them. SEEING myself make mistakes really helps make things click in my brain. Its funny too, because I'll often find myself watching the videos, yelling at myself to shorten my reins, sit back and look up without even realizing it!

Rhiannonjk
Jul. 21, 2011, 10:30 AM
I'm sure this is mixed in all the other ideas here, but sometimes just hearing the same thing from somebody else makes it different enough that something clicks. Maybe that's a clinician, or another student of the same trainer, or just a barn-mate. You are getting a lot of it here - but I have found that when I work with one trainer and we just can't seem to get through an issue, one ride with somebody else can give that particular issue a different perspective.

It isn't that the first trainer is any worse than the other voice - sometimes it is simply hearing the issue addressed from a different perspective. Some slight difference in wording at just the right time may give you that "Click" that you need to push on.

Even if it is just a barn-mate, a comment like "you look like you are hunching forward" might help you realize that you are collapsing your shoulders when you look down. Or "Why aren't your heels down as much today?" helps me remind my barn-mate that she's pinching with her knees. Or just sharing the arena with a few ban-mates might get you looking up, to prevent crashes!

Think of all the different ways you can tell a person to look up:
- lift your chin
- focus on that tree in the distance
- Stretch up!
- Let me see the inside of your nostrils!

also, my guess would be that looking down isn't the lone issue - are your sholders back? Is your pelvis tilted properly? Maybe these are issues that you can focus on that will fix your head position along the way!

TheHorseProblem
Aug. 13, 2011, 07:13 PM
I just want to say that I am almost finished writing my affirmations, as per the formula below, and the transformation in my riding is nothing short of miraculous. I am relaxed. My horse is relaxed. I am cantering over poles on the ground. I have developed a soft and following seat and kind hands (mostly). Somewhere I have before videos, and my friend took some pictures of me riding today, and it was like seeing pictures of someone else--some confident person who knew how to ride and had "feel." Someone else please try it and see if it works for you!:)



I recently reached a low point in my riding as well. My issue has to do with fear. To make matters worse, my horse suddenly became very spooky, and I got really concerned that my own spookiness would harm him--that I would confirm his fears and end up with an unrideable horse.

Jane Savoie wrote a book called That Winning Feeling. I have had it for a long time, but never cracked it, as I was horseless on and off for a couple of years. Anyway, it is really helping me resolve some of these issues. For me it is fear, but the techniques of meditation, relaxation, and imaging have made a huge difference for me lately. Of course, as a nervous rider, I am always looking down so I can spook first :lol: so to counteract that, in my mind, I picture myself going around, head up, soft seat and hands. It takes some concentration, but I try to imagine cantering every stride around the ring.

Also, many years ago, a new age-y friend was helping me overcome my doubts about whether I could go to university. She suggested a Bible-based formula of 70 X 7 (supposedly that is how many times Jesus said to forgive someone or something like that--where's Western when you need him/her?) I wrote down the 10 reasons why I could not go to college. Then she helped me turn these statements into positives, and my assignment was to write each one 70 X 7 times. I got my B.A. from the University of California before I ever finished writing them.

So I am applying this principle to my riding. I wrote down my worst faults, all of which are rooted in my anxiety--gripping, not rewarding my horse, looking down, giving mixed signals--and wrote an affirmation to counteract it. I work on the writing part a little bit every day.

Doing this has made me realize that I know how to ride. Every lesson, every correction, every wise word I've ever read is all in there. I have, at some point and in some ride, applied all this wisdom and ridden well. It just needs to become a part of me in a deeper way.

One of my biggest excuses is that I learned to ride as an adult; I will never be as good as someone who grew up on the back of a horse. So, there was a woman (mid-thirties maybe) at our barn the other day trying out a GP sale horse with her BNT at her side. I watched her ride this horse over a 5' oxer, then later, overheard her telling someone that she learned to ride as an adult. You would never know that to watch her ride, supple and fearless. So this just confirms for me that my limitations are all between my ears.

I am really curious about The Talent Code!