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Ibex
Jul. 4, 2011, 12:04 PM
.

Stepping away quietly.

wcporter
Jul. 4, 2011, 12:19 PM
Wow..that woman has a lot of nerve! :eek:

CatPS
Jul. 4, 2011, 12:24 PM
I'd discuss it with the barn owner. That's a very dangerous situation, and you shouldn't have to put up with it on a routine basis from the same horse/rider.

AlterBy
Jul. 4, 2011, 12:25 PM
I would have promptly informed the BO and the trainer about the DANGEROUS situation.

And I probably would have said something 'not so nice' to that fellow boarder...especially one with such attitude... (I did before and I'm not afraid to speak loud for my safety!)

I had my fair share of stupids.

You should ask this boarder what is her schedule and be clear to let her know that it is because YOU don't want to ride with her because she is DANGEROUS. You don't want to expose YOUR horse to such trouble and if an accident had to happen, you'd have no choice but to sue her.

Your horse don't need to be exposed to such 'accident waiting to happen' situations!

summerhorse
Jul. 4, 2011, 12:40 PM
You are way more polite than I would have been. I'd have at least asked her why she didn't have her horse under control.

cyfskid
Jul. 4, 2011, 12:47 PM
BO should insist she gets some lessons or moves out safety first blah blah

Hoofpick
Jul. 4, 2011, 02:09 PM
That's very unsafe and inappropriate for her to blame you for your horses behavior. Her horse is barging around like a lunatic and she wants you to reprimand your horse?

Definitely notify B.O. That is a disaster waiting to happen.

Whisper
Jul. 4, 2011, 02:11 PM
I think you were wise to be cautious, and I agree that you should talk with the BO/BM. I had a similar incident, though the pony was usually a saint with her little rider. Something happened, and pony bolted, and the kid completely lost her nerve and started screaming, which made it worse. Panicking pony took refuge *underneath* the OTTB gelding I was leasing!:eek: Her withers, saddle, and the kid were wedged as far as they would go, with her little ears and nose poking out the other side. Thankfully, he just craned his head around to peer at her as if to say, "Just what do you think you're doing? I'm not your Mom." Kid stopped screaming and was able to extract the two of them successfully, and we had no further problems.:lol: I couldn't have blamed him if he had objected more strenuously to her attempt to use his tummy like a Thellwellian tree branch, but was very grateful that he wasn't rattled.

DutchDressageQueen
Jul. 4, 2011, 02:32 PM
You are being too kind to that woman! it is not your fault her horse is acting up. She told you Not to leave when her horse is acting in that way, putting you and your horse in danger as well. Heck to her, and leave the arena! You care about your horse's wellness.

You should also ask her when she rides, so that you will be able to ride at a different time, without her in the arena with you.
Also notify the barn owner and barn manager of this dangerous behavior.

mzm farm
Jul. 4, 2011, 03:25 PM
I would be clear that I expect my reasonable "buffer" space not to be invaded - verbally with the horse's owner; talk to BO/BM/trainer. Then I would teach my horse to tolerate a lunge whip being carried and used while on the ground and mounted. My space would be made very clear and defended next time if challenged.

I had experienced an incident of intimidation. An upper level rider came at me on my greenie. She had two whips, spurs, and was intently staring at the pommel of the saddle while barreling on. Since she was not looking nor calling where she was going, I had no way to know how to get out of her way. My horse: 17.2h brick shit house that is fine playing rough, hers ~ 16.1h. I think she was a little surprised when I called and she finally looked up. She scares many other people into not riding in the arena when she rides at all. I really do not think that is fair to other boarders. I did not find such atmosphere enjoyable.

Yes, sometimes people loose control of their horses, it does happen. I hope your situation is resolved safely.

Vesper Sparrow
Jul. 4, 2011, 03:58 PM
Stuff happens but as far as dangerous riding goes, we have two offenders at my barn, one who always looks down instead of where she is going, another who is prone to giving high pitched shrieks when her horse acts up. The main problem occurs in winter in the indoor.

I suggested half-jokingly half-seriously to our coach that she put them together in a lesson and maybe that would teach them. Unfortunately, the coach was not amused.

Velvet
Jul. 4, 2011, 07:17 PM
Wasn't there, so I have no idea what happened and how dangerous it really was, but no one has the right to tell you how to correct your own horse. Only your trainer can do that, or someone you're friends with and they have an understanding with you that they can give you their opinion regarding training.

That, to me, is the worst part. The dangerous situation is one you can't always avoid and it just happened the one time. I'd avoid the person like the plague. I'd never ride in the same ring. I'd figure out her normal riding times and just ride another time. It's not worth the risk nor the headache of dealing with someone like that.

As for her comment, I would have told her that I didn't appreciate her telling me how to train my horse and that she should be looking more closely at how she is or is NOT training her horse. Physician heal thyself sort of reply. :yes:

Seriously, that is just not acceptable. You didn't initiate a conversation with her about her horse's problem, how dare she assume she can talk to you about your horse.

As for the other comments about riding with morons who don't look up, etc., that really doesn't sound at all similar to your situation. Those people are just morons who don't know how to ride (I don't care what sort of horse they're on-if it does FEI levels or not, they are not RIDERS/HORSEWOMEN if they behave that way).

wehrlegirl
Jul. 4, 2011, 07:35 PM
The whole 'dont move , dont move' thing gets me.. its your physical safety.. move if you damn well please. You were very nice about it but no one should ask you to stand there while their horse is not under control.. as you said you had experience being run over- not fun. I was a driving competition when something like that happened: horse was flipping out and careening sideways towards a group of us on folding chairs.. I got up and moved was was yelled at by the driver not to move.. yeah , right.

lawchick
Jul. 4, 2011, 08:07 PM
Been there, bought the t-shirt. Newbie horse owner that bought 2 young green-broke fresians. Horses were probably nice but smart enough to take advantage of the not very bright owner.

In the beginning, people tried to gently offer help, advice, trainer contacts, etc. but it fell on deaf ears. Basically, everyone at the barn just avoided riding in the arena at the same time until he finally went away. Usually, that's all you can do.

Valentina_32926
Jul. 5, 2011, 01:14 PM
... I'd avoid the person like the plague. ...As for her comment, I would have told her that I didn't appreciate her telling me how to train my horse and that she should be looking more closely at how she is or is NOT training her horse.

Agree with this -so talk to BO/BM then next you see girl tell her next time this happens, since she can't control her horse, you WILL leave with your horse - her horse is her problem. You are responsible to keep yourself and your horse from getting hurt, keeping her and her horse safe is HER responsibility. :eek:

meupatdoes
Jul. 5, 2011, 01:23 PM
The next time she hollers at you not to move, holler right back at her to get the eff out of the ring until she can control her horse.

Carve out some space yourself with some well-placed swings of your dressage whip, if necessary.

I mean, I have no problems if someone else's horse bolts at the other end of the arena. This other riders should be able to deal with. If your horse loses his marbles because somebody else spooks 30' away I have very little sympathy.

But CLIMBING ON TOP OF YOU?
Not ok.

mp
Jul. 5, 2011, 01:36 PM
Just one question: How can a horse bolt in tiny circles? That must be one agile mare. :)

But I agree with what meup said -- horses should be able to handle another horse being goofy from a distance. But when it gets close up, you do whatever necessary to get the other horse away from you and your horse. And let RiderX deal with consequences.

And telling someone how to discipline his/her horse? Oh, I don't think so. Unless someone is endangering me and my horse, I keep my mouth shut.

my_doran
Jul. 5, 2011, 10:44 PM
for me there was a problem on either side..jmo.

as i think rider x with spazzy horse needed to deal with her horse better,knowing her horse is like that and not blame rider y for her horse ,not being under control.but rider y should of moved away e.g another part of ring away from said horse if it bugged her that much of her/horses safety..as i have been on both sides of this problem as well, recently.when my horse has caused problems at times i either left the ring with my disobedient horse and i apologized for it. and if im rider mounted with spazzed horse near by, i moved away to another spot till it was dealt with.i mean if i knew this horse had a problem in first place with handler i would have given space right away when they entered ring.
but even said with all this..do think rider x should of not been so rude about it all or asked for advice or ?.

Ibex
Jul. 6, 2011, 01:12 AM
.

cu.at.x
Jul. 6, 2011, 01:16 AM
Rider X appears a while later... and informs me that I "need to learn to deal with that stuff better", and I should have "shanked the sh*t out of my horse with the curb rein for reacting to another horse. This stuff happens."

:eek: She needs a "come to Jesus" moment, pronto. I hate people like this. It's one thing to be clueless but humble and accept help, but quite another to be a b*** about endangering everyone else's safety.

quietann
Jul. 6, 2011, 08:50 AM
for me there was a problem on either side..jmo.

as i think rider x with spazzy horse needed to deal with her horse better,knowing her horse is like that and not blame rider y for her horse ,not being under control.but rider y should of moved away e.g another part of ring away from said horse if it bugged her that much of her/horses safety..as i have been on both sides of this problem as well, recently.when my horse has caused problems at times i either left the ring with my disobedient horse and i apologized for it. and if im rider mounted with spazzed horse near by, i moved away to another spot till it was dealt with.i mean if i knew this horse had a problem in first place with handler i would have given space right away when they entered ring.
but even said with all this..do think rider x should of not been so rude about it all or asked for advice or ?.

Um, go back and reread. Rider Y (OP) was going to mount her horse and Rider X's horse *charged over them* after which that horse was running in tiny circles around them. In other words, OP was trapped there. She could NOT go anywhere until Rider X got her horse under control.

/dreads the return of indoor-only season...

spinandslide
Jul. 6, 2011, 10:23 AM
I know I'm not a dressage rider..now..:)..but I think your situation could be applied to ANY group of riders and horses..and I have experienced it myself..

my favorite instant of a situation similar to yours was a girl cutting me off in warmup, her horse double barreling at MY mare and the other rider chewing me out..WTF?:confused:

I am usually a tactful person, but I would have come unglued to have a person such as "Rider X" come up and proceed to try and tell me what I should have done? To me, that is like coping out on her responsiblity in the sitiuation..which is mostly of HER and her nag's doing..

I am sorry you have to deal with such a peon..:(

ideayoda
Jul. 6, 2011, 10:34 AM
But LOL she like does not chainshank the #*($& out of her mare....

THe trainer and BO are responsible for either educating the lady or moving her out or making a time just for her so that the rest of you are safe(r).

magnolia73
Jul. 6, 2011, 02:41 PM
You know, my new barn is generally empty when I come ride, and I was thinking about how I kind of miss riding with people sometimes. And reading this.... yeah, I'll take riding alone and listening to an ipod for entertainment.

BetterOffRed
Jul. 6, 2011, 02:57 PM
I'd avoid the person like the plague. I'd never ride in the same ring. I'd figure out her normal riding times and just ride another time. It's not worth the risk nor the headache of dealing with someone like that.

As for her comment, I would have told her that I didn't appreciate her telling me how to train my horse and that she should be looking more closely at how she is or is NOT training her horse. Physician heal thyself sort of reply. :yes:

Seriously, that is just not acceptable. You didn't initiate a conversation with her about her horse's problem, how dare she assume she can talk to you about your horse.



THISSSSS!!!!

leilatigress
Jul. 6, 2011, 03:06 PM
I have one of these. Fortunately I'm not shy and as I was paying for that time with the trainer I really had no issues telling her exactly what she could do with that horse.

DD is taking a lesson on the pony in the ring, it's the same time every week, has been for the past 2 years. Rider X decides to ride her spastic, needs a real work schedule, badly trained horse in the arena with DD. Initially I didn't have a problem with this as she was on the outside and DD was working on the lateral. Then Rider X's spaz decides to bolt....right over the top of DD. Thankfully I actually know this horse and saw the signs a mile away, so did trainer. So when the 16hh+ monster decided to run over the 11hh pony neither pony or DD were in the path. Trainer remanded Rider X to the outside until lesson was over. (It's her barn) We're almost to the close of the lesson, DD is doing a canter when the rider decides to join in the canter. This would have worked well except pony strides don't match horse strides and as Rider X is coming up at a decided f*ed up lope/gallop gait it's getting interesting. Then horse decides to try and take a chunk out of pony, except it's DD he's gonna get since she's on top of the pony. Trainer and I both yell DUCK and PULL! as horse goes past. Horse missed DD by maybe a foot and she's crying and poor pony is shaking. Pulled DD off to make sure she's okay and Rider X actually has the balls to laugh. Commented that DD was a great rider and wow wasn't that fun.

Let's just say it wasn't pretty. I might have called the Rider a few choice names and mentioned that her riding was the worst I'd ever seen. By some miracle I didn't threaten her or the horse. She doesn't ride on the same day DD does now.

mp
Jul. 6, 2011, 03:07 PM
It was.... interesting.... head in the air, rider trying to reef her head to the inside. And it really wasn't the out of control horse that got to me (although they have a history of it... woman thinks it's funny when her horse runs into the corner where people are sitting), it was the comments after...!

Oh, I don't know. The Don't move!!! DON'T MOVE!!!!! thing would have ticked me off just about as much. The unsolicited training advice was just icing on the cake.

I don't run into this very often at my barn. Most of my barn mates can keep hold of their horses, or at least know how to stay out of other people's way.

Although, we have cowboys who don't know how to share an arena very well. One of them used to come roaring up behind me, do a sliding stop right between my horse and the rail, then do a rollback and roar off the other way. Then one day I accidentally clothes-lined him with my whip. Honest to god, I didn't mean to do it, but it solved the problem.

I'd suggest you try something equally harmless, yet unmistakable. But with a longer whip. ;)

DiablosHalo
Jul. 6, 2011, 03:26 PM
Having such an unruly horse is a liability for both the horse owner AND the farm owner. I would talk to the BO immediately. Maybe go so far to send a certified letter to the BO stating the danger the horse presents in her facility.

I have a clause in my boarding contract that ANY horse deemed dangerous shall be confined and given 48hrs to leave the premises. I will not tolerate a dangerous horse on my property- and I don't have any riding boarders. I can't imagine the liability headache I'd have if there were people in/out of my barn with a lunatic owner and untrained horse. whew...

katarine
Jul. 6, 2011, 03:42 PM
I was all set to enter the arena at a local facility for my ride in a dressage clinic. Out of nowhere he comes the property owner on his fire breathing monster into the arena we'd rented for the clinic. Though it was a large dressage court, with only cross ties for 'walls'- there was no way I wanted to be anywhere inside those walls with that particular idiot( two legged, and four). That poor animal was terrified of the arena mirrors,the tent, himself, everything- plunging wheeling spinning bolting- he was on the bleeding edge of leaving the surface of the earth and peeling his brain out of its box at any moment. There are horses too out of control to warrant 'standing firm' and making your horse deal with it. Once I determined I could safely be between him and the mirrors, fine...but there for a bit, we just sat and watched. From outside looking in.

You tell that trainer to quit gnawing ineffectively on this heifer's butt and make real changes: Like kicking her out of the barn before she gets someone hurt or cripples a horse. Like telling her she may NOT enter the arena with other riders present. Make her miserable enough that she leaves.

esdressage
Jul. 6, 2011, 05:00 PM
Then one day I accidentally clothes-lined him with my whip. Honest to god, I didn't mean to do it, but it solved the problem.

I'd suggest you try something equally harmless, yet unmistakable. But with a longer whip. ;)

:lol:

stryder
Jul. 6, 2011, 05:38 PM
So how do you share space in a situation like this?? Coping tactics?

Simple. I wouldn't share. I'm not passive-aggressive about things, but would simply avoid her. Would leave the arena if she entered. And if asked, would simply say I don't think she's safe, doesn't seem to be able to control her horse, and I'm not going to be part of the wreck that's sure to happen. Just not worth it to me.

I think I'd also figure out when she rides. If necessary, ask her. And if she asks why, tell her the truth.

Ghazzu
Jul. 6, 2011, 05:51 PM
I'd be tempted to put her on notice that the next time her horse charges you, you're going to beat *her* ass. That is, once she gets her head out of it...

Little-Horse
Jul. 6, 2011, 06:19 PM
I agree with others talk to the owner of the barn or the barn manager. You should enjoy you're time on you're horse and not have to worry about getting trampled.
I also find it disturbing and sad that she suggested that you should punish you're horse in that manner......good luck and stay safe