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View Full Version : If you were a first time CANTER buyer . . .



ACMEeventing
Jun. 24, 2011, 11:19 PM
So, hypothetically speaking, if you were to fall in like with a CANTER horse how would you proceed? Do you just contact the person in the ad? Do they have a preferred vet for PPE or do you provide your own? Etc . . .

Any info from experience buyers in appreciated! I want to take the plunge but want some guidance first.

Thanks all!

Justa Bob
Jun. 25, 2011, 12:42 AM
You call the number on the listing - it's usually the trainer or assistant. There may be recommended vets on the CANTER website (typically you don't want the vet recommended by a seller because of conflict of interest...but you also may not have a lot of options). Track vets are experienced knowing track horses and what injuries to look for and what is considered usual wear and tear.

If you can bring an experienced friend or trainer to help -- its always good to have support and guidance.

Keep appointments, be prompt and professional. Be respectful of busy trainers so that track trainers will continue to work with CANTER.

Here are some resources from Canter - including buying an OTTB.

http://www.canterne.org/vets.htm

http://www.canterusa.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80&Itemid=94

Contact your local CANTER - they are super helpful and informative:
http://www.canterusa.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=82&Itemid=95

Lots of CANTER volunteers post here...so you should be getting more responses.

Best wishes!

ACMEeventing
Jun. 25, 2011, 10:18 AM
Thanks, appreciate the info!

pegasusmom
Jun. 25, 2011, 10:42 AM
The director of CANTER Mid-Atlantic posts on here frequently and I know where she lives :D:D if you'd like an intro!

Toadie's mom
Jun. 25, 2011, 10:55 AM
The only thing I'll add is to make sure it's in a location where you can go see the horse yourself. If it's a really nice horse and someone on here offers to go take a look for you (because they're much closer), be prepared to have the horse bought out from under you:(

I'm over it now, but it's happened to me twice. Yeah, I'm slow but eventually I catch on. I tried to take it as a compliment. That I have a good eye;)

Lone
Jun. 25, 2011, 11:56 AM
The only thing I'll add is to make sure it's in a location where you can go see the horse yourself. If it's a really nice horse and someone on here offers to go take a look for you (because they're much closer), be prepared to have the horse bought out from under you:(

I'm over it now, but it's happened to me twice. Yeah, I'm slow but eventually I catch on. I tried to take it as a compliment. That I have a good eye;)

Wow, that's really disappointing someone would do that! I live too far away from any CANTER sites so I had always figured that I'd try to beg someone to go check out the horse for me.

judybigredpony
Jun. 25, 2011, 01:56 PM
Toadies Mom...if you find something in the Mid-Atantic region..except Mountanieer I would be more than Happy to go look,touch, jog, flex, ask questions and get you ASAP photo's of all legs feet etc...and promise NOT to buy your pony!!! :)

Xctrygirl
Jun. 25, 2011, 03:07 PM
Welcome to the world of Off Track buying...

1.) Be prepared for not being able to have your typical time frames. This isn't a show horse, money talks and the sale horse walks. Typically what happens is you or an agent for you (Who agrees not to buy the horse for themself unless you pass on it!! That sucks Toadie!!) goes and sees the horses and maybe takes pics. Watch it move. and thats about it. The rules of a racetrack are very clear, you must be licensed as an ex rider or jockey to ride. Period. Once upon a time I was able to sit on a Canter horse at Charlestown because I held a current lics. But that's very atypical.

2.) Other people can see that this horse is for sale. So interest, and competition to take it home can come up in the blink of an eye. Thus decisions should be made quickly. If you get a bad/iffy/unsure feeling from a horse when you see it...it's best to walkaway and let someone else in who "knows" that's their horse on first sight.

3.) Racetrack trainers come in 1 varities...open and closed minded. Some respect the show world, others do not. Your comments should thus be kept to a dull roar since you don't know which type your dream horse resides with. Going on and on and inadvertently saying things that disparage them will not help you or the horse. An implied "dig" spoken when viewing has more than once led to a mystery buyer coming 10 mins after you leave and thus the horse is gone. Praise the horse's condition and his overall health, don't obsess over racetrack normalities such as:

a.) Poultice on up over the knees
b.) lack of a pulled mane/ mane on wrong side
c.) lack of weight
d.) mis matched items like nylon halters etc
e.) dirty stalls in late afternoon. (Remember they're mucked before the sun came up)
f.) horse that doesn't jog in hand well
g.) anything to do with shoeing

4.) Bear in mind the horse you see before you will have to go through a variety of transitions if you buy it. Do not forget that it takes a multitude of steps and patience to get to the show/pleasure horse within

5.) Ask questions to the horse's ex rider if at all possible. They may not tell you everything, but what they will tell you is usually an indication of things to come.

6.) I don't care if they're gonna give you Animal Kingdom, Secretariat or Smarty Jones for free... pull up his race records. There are indications about his soundness and overall health within those independent records that no owner or trainer can hide. SO CHECK it for free on Equibase.com. If you need help decifering the ancient hyrogliphics that is a horse race record.. ask us. Many here have worked at the track and know how to determine where an abcess, tendon or chips is showing up with a casual absence from works or running.

That's all I can think of right now.

Good luck.

~Emily

judybigredpony
Jun. 25, 2011, 04:37 PM
OP alot of what Emily says is true, but your 1st step is to make the call to the number on the AD.

Ask everything you can think of in as short an concise as possible, does it have x-rays, will its wind scope, does it have any joint chips, has it had surgery, do all 4 legs point in the same direction..i.e. is horse close to correct. has horse had any colic since w/ this trainer, Horses JC name and any vices..they only really have to disclose cribbing by the way. Be polite clear and straight forward. I usually ask if they would expect horse to pass a vetting w/ x-rays. Suprisingly most will give an honest answer if they know there is something lurking. ...Also do expect that in some instances you will be lied to by ommission.....
I let the seller know I am serious have the cash and would come pre-prepeared to Vet that day pay and go.
You can get a list of track available Vets from CANTER or track and ask your choice if they would be on grounds that day. Try to go as close to race track closes from gallops before they poultic legs, feed, rake shed and go.
Tell trainer what time you be there and let him know what horses you want to see the legs open on.
Some trainers will invite you to come early and see horse gallope.
Make sure you take your trailer, cash, have names and numbers of Vets on you and have a vaild photo ID for the gate.

If you are having someone else do this for you, be prepared to Western Union the $$ to trainer to pay for horse. Get a signed bill of sale and have your hauling to your state planned and payment cost anticipated and in place.

Its not all negotive.......alot of us do this all the time and can help you.

Being polite, on time, complimentary to trainer about condition of horse etc is HUGE, and do not show up w/ a huge posse of nosy parkers!!! Lookie lous w/ no money tire kickers.Don't wear shorts tank top and flip flops...or ridng breeches n 1/2 chaps....try Jeans collard shirt n paddock boots.
Have the horses name and race record if you have questions on you.

Have fun...............
Trainers and helps time is valuable start early and they want to get done eat and catch some 'z's" before racing or doing another job.

Toadie's mom
Jun. 25, 2011, 05:08 PM
Toadies Mom...if you find something in the Mid-Atantic region..except Mountanieer I would be more than Happy to go look,touch, jog, flex, ask questions and get you ASAP photo's of all legs feet etc...and promise NOT to buy your pony!!! :)
Thanks for the offer! Fortunately I was able to find a wonderful gelding from a race barn I was familiar with here in TX. If I hear of anyone else looking I'll steer them your way.

ACMEeventing
Jun. 25, 2011, 05:33 PM
The director of CANTER Mid-Atlantic posts on here frequently and I know where she lives :D:D if you'd like an intro!

ENABLER!!!!

XC Girl and JudyBRP - thanks for all the information. It really is a different world, isn't it? It all seems a little overwhelming, but with the right help I'm sure I'd get through it ;)

I wouldn't mind letting a nice diamond in the rough have a 6 month sabatical in the field. No hurries and I have lots of good training help.

Xctrygirl
Jun. 25, 2011, 05:47 PM
OK let me ask the next logical question.

Why aren't you lookinga round you for one that's already been transitioned?

So I get that the Canter on the track listings are in expensive, but 6 months of board while you're letting the decompress costs $$$ as well. So why not throw those 6 months of expenses onto your budget and get one that has been transitioned and you can do a proper vetting and test ride on??

I mean that seems like the best idea.

I know the Canter director too, and her main NC based rider. I can be a horrible enabler.

Also side note...

Over in N.C., there's an auction out there way east of Pinehurst, and I found my Registered IRISH TB there with papers, for $800. Do some scouring first. Diamonds are all around you.

OMG there's a competing 5 yr old TB by Medaglia D'oro near you for $4k. Go buy him!!!!! I know I would if I could.

~Emily

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1669854

pegasusmom
Jun. 25, 2011, 05:56 PM
ENABLER!!!!



Yep! Her main NC based rider also rides for me from time to time. They have nice horses all the time who have already decompressed and been fooled with a bit.

You know we picked one up sight unseen (I did watch his last race on HRTV - then shipped him from Washington state four days later) and I'm not sure I would go that route again. We got lucky and got a really nice one, albeit with major gut issues, but I'd give first call to going through Fairweather and company if I had it to do over again.

He's up with the big horse and a certain Aussie right now, learning to be an eventer. And I do know you have ALL that pasture that needs to be munched up!

Toadie's mom
Jun. 25, 2011, 07:09 PM
The director of CANTER Mid-Atlantic posts on here frequently and I know where she lives :D:D if you'd like an intro!
Not sure if this is the same person, but check out the blog "Learning How to See What an OTTB Can Be". It appears to the right of the forums page under Most Popular Articles. Very well written, and just some more food for thought.

ACMEeventing
Jun. 25, 2011, 07:13 PM
XCgirl you are also a world class enabler! And, yes, Pegasusmom it is a lot of pasture to munch. I promise you will have a neighbor soon :)

Very good point about getting one that is already rested, just didn't want to sound like "oh, I want a perfect world . . . blah, blah, blah" There are so many nice horses that just want a second chance.

Keep you posted! Oh, and XCgirl, feel free to PM any more hot leads ;)

Jennifer

Xctrygirl
Jun. 25, 2011, 07:48 PM
World Class enabler though I may be I am almost always first and foreost a realist.

I want to see horses leaving the track going to homes that include people who know how to teach a track horse during every ride how to become a sound and sane pleasure/show horse. No moments of "Oh god, why's he doing this?" or "WOW... this is a FAST trot! Why is pulling not working?"

I watched a special this afternoon with Suze Orman and she made a fantastic point. You have to be honest with your inner truth. She meant that owning up to your actual life circumstances and learning how to accept yourself with these truths as fact allows people to move forward and become healthier in all aspects. Now even though she is referring to financial issues, I believe it applies for horsemanship too.

I'll never be an upper-echelon rider. I can gallop about 60% of all Tb's but not the tough ones, and I can feel the fear in me when pushed beyond my limits. And I am ok with that.

Not everyone should take a horse off the track. Not everyone should ride without an instructor guiding their skillls. Not everyone can go above BN. And all of this is fine. The horse world is a diverse place and there are plenty of crosses, older horses with a minor issue or upper level horses on the way down that are out there and need to teach people. Don't overlook those worthy partners b/c the ottb is a popular tool for some.

Look around and widen the search. You'll likely find someone who just is dying for a shot to let you feed them carrots and mints.

~Emily

ACMEeventing
Jun. 25, 2011, 08:00 PM
Clearly this has touched a nerve. I hear what you're saying and I respect you for it. But please don't assume that I'm a naive teen looking through rose colored glasses because I want to feed mints to "a rescue".

Sometimes I don't get you OTTB voices. You constantly preach the value of giving these guys (and gals) a shot at a 2nd career, but then come down with the "maybe you should just go find a nice safe fella with an old tendon injury and leave the TBs to the real horseman"

(shrug)

Xctrygirl
Jun. 25, 2011, 08:15 PM
Forgive me, I wasn't clear.

My message was to all. No one was being specifically addressed. Not you, not anyone you know. (Well that I know of anyway)

I have just seen a lot of OTTB's going to the wrong homes. And on a thread that addresses a good topic (1st time Canter shopper) I want out it out there that not everyone is meant for an ottb.

My apologies. I hope my clarification is easier to understand.

~Emily

ACMEeventing
Jun. 25, 2011, 08:32 PM
Amen sister!

I truly respect your honesty. I believe it should extend to all purchase situations. I hate seeing an owner not "own up" to their responsibilities. We have all these expectations of our horses, the least we can do is make their job easier by tending to all of their physical and mental needs. I recently attended a dressage clinic by an amazing world class rider and he said "your first job is to never make your horse's job harder"( I wish I could type with an accent to make it more entertaining!)

Sometimes that means enlisting the help of a knowledgeable trainer, sometimes it means spending money on joint injections, sometimes it means money in supplements, sometimes it just means . . . time.

Brigitte
Jun. 26, 2011, 04:27 PM
ACME, you are lucky to have them so close to you. I was in your situation not too long ago and wasn't sure I wanted to go the route of buying through the trainer or right off the track.

Then I discovered MidAtlantic Canter and MidAtlantic Horse Rescue. Both are fantastic and when you try the horses they have already had some downtime and are ready to go to work. They have also had some rides on them, often off the farm. They want the horses placed in the right homes and can give you a good idea of personalities or what they think the horse might excel at doing.

The horses aren't finished by any means, but it takes away a lot of the worry.

Calamber
Jun. 26, 2011, 06:27 PM
Welcome to the world of Off Track buying...

1.) Be prepared for not being able to have your typical time frames. This isn't a show horse, money talks and the sale horse walks. Typically what happens is you or an agent for you (Who agrees not to buy the horse for themself unless you pass on it!! That sucks Toadie!!) goes and sees the horses and maybe takes pics. Watch it move. and thats about it. The rules of a racetrack are very clear, you must be licensed as an ex rider or jockey to ride. Period. Once upon a time I was able to sit on a Canter horse at Charlestown because I held a current lics. But that's very atypical.

2.) Other people can see that this horse is for sale. So interest, and competition to take it home can come up in the blink of an eye. Thus decisions should be made quickly. If you get a bad/iffy/unsure feeling from a horse when you see it...it's best to walkaway and let someone else in who "knows" that's their horse on first sight.

3.) Racetrack trainers come in 1 varities...open and closed minded. Some respect the show world, others do not. Your comments should thus be kept to a dull roar since you don't know which type your dream horse resides with. Going on and on and inadvertently saying things that disparage them will not help you or the horse. An implied "dig" spoken when viewing has more than once led to a mystery buyer coming 10 mins after you leave and thus the horse is gone. Praise the horse's condition and his overall health, don't obsess over racetrack normalities such as:

a.) Poultice on up over the knees
b.) lack of a pulled mane/ mane on wrong side
c.) lack of weight
d.) mis matched items like nylon halters etc
e.) dirty stalls in late afternoon. (Remember they're mucked before the sun came up)
f.) horse that doesn't jog in hand well
g.) anything to do with shoeing

4.) Bear in mind the horse you see before you will have to go through a variety of transitions if you buy it. Do not forget that it takes a multitude of steps and patience to get to the show/pleasure horse within

5.) Ask questions to the horse's ex rider if at all possible. They may not tell you everything, but what they will tell you is usually an indication of things to come.

6.) I don't care if they're gonna give you Animal Kingdom, Secretariat or Smarty Jones for free... pull up his race records. There are indications about his soundness and overall health within those independent records that no owner or trainer can hide. SO CHECK it for free on Equibase.com. If you need help decifering the ancient hyrogliphics that is a horse race record.. ask us. Many here have worked at the track and know how to determine where an abcess, tendon or chips is showing up with a casual absence from works or running.

That's all I can think of right now.

Good luck.

~Emily

This says it all and should be sent to the sticky page if such a thing exists for buying horses off the track. If it does not, I would like to send it to the mods as a request for a sticky.
Do you mind?

CookiePony
Jun. 26, 2011, 06:41 PM
I agree, this is a great thread, and any of us can add it to the Eventing FAQs sticky at the top of the forum. I will do it right now!

shea'smom
Jun. 26, 2011, 07:19 PM
ACME, I'm in NC and I want a new pony, too. Are you planning to go yourself to look? (Enable).

ACMEeventing
Jun. 26, 2011, 07:46 PM
Just starting this and I don't have any concrete plans yet. I'm very fortunate in that I have some incredible resources to lend a hand in the retraining.

stolen virtue
Jun. 26, 2011, 07:49 PM
I did buy a Canter horse and the experience was great. I bought an OTTB that was already let down and in training. He is a wonderfull horse and Canter was was very helpful. Good luck.

ACMEeventing
Jun. 26, 2011, 07:51 PM
I'm really glad that this thread has started a discussion. I agree that there ought to be a sticky devoted to being a resource for first-timers.

KC058
Jun. 26, 2011, 08:05 PM
As someone who has bought a few trainer listed OTTBs and LOVED them.. here is my advice.

Call the trainer and explain that you are looking for a sound, sane, performance horse. Call some other trainers at the same racetrack and explain what you want.

Trip 1 to the track: evaluate as many horses as possible in person. Pick your top three.

Trip 2 to the track: Have your vet do a flex test on the three top choices. Further vet the most sound horse and hope it all works out :) Consider a few X-rays. The buying price and the pre-purchase exam is the cheapest part of owning a horse over it's lifetime. KNOW what you are getting into and if the horses' problems are problems you are willing to deal with.

If you get the horse home and he/she is too much for you to handle at least you can hand over good X-rays and a good pre-purchase to someone who can handle a hot OTTB. This way you aren't stuck with a crazy, brokedown horse who you will have to donate to a rescue who is likely already overrun with these types of horses.

Keep an open mind. The horse that most suits your needs may not be the horse in the ad or your favorite color/size. IMO you can only save one horse- it might as well be the most sound one unless you are just trying to do a good deed. The only reason to do the trainer listings (where you are paying more, and they are not transitioned at all) is to get a horse that is very sound and injury free. They are out there.

PS: Their feet will likely look awkward to you. Tb's are often shod long in the toe for racing. After one session with a good farrier- all will be looking much better.

Be prepared to go through 10-12lbs of a good quality grain A DAY!!! and up to 1 bale of GOOD quality hay. Purina Ultium has been a good choice for me. it was $20 a bag last time I bought it for my OTTB. Succeed is a good supplement for the common OTTB stomach. You may need to do a month or more of ulcerguard to heal ulcers. You might consider scoping the horse during the pre-purchase. You are looking at $$$$$$$$$ to feed your new horse and get him looking great. This is not like feeding a 15H QH.

You horse needs let out in a pasture for short periods at first and with SUPERVISION. Do not turn an OTTB out for the first time and go to work. They are likely to panic. They are not used to turnout. They are also used to morning gallops.. So be prepared for a horse to get really wound up at first until he gets used to the rhythm of his new life.

If you pick the quietest horse at the track- he/she may just be very depressed and will turn into a different horse with buddies, turnout, and a good feeding program.

If you are willing to take a horse that is sound on some old injuries go with NV or CANTER owned horses and save yourself some of the transition and pay less.

I have found that trainer listed horses are usually the only ones sound enough for my personal situation.

GOOD LUCK!! If you like anything in the Ohio area. I'll meet you there :)

Jleegriffith
Jun. 26, 2011, 08:14 PM
If there is a CANTER group at the track you are looking at it is always helpful to contact the rep for that track. I head up the Delaware Park program and know most of the trainers and have seen the horses. I have no issues directing people to the trainers who are honest and patient with those who are less than familiar with buying horses right off the track.

I also do some of the retraining for CANTER MA and I think buying a horse that has been let down puts buyers at a huge advantage. We have done all the hard work! They get 2 months minimum to let down and just be horses, feet done, teeth done, chiro and then we start evaulating them. They go on trail rides, x-c schools and maybe even baby shows if they haven't sold by then. We figure out their personality and what they want to be in life which eliminates a lot of the guessing game. We also have had a chance to evaluate soundness and start to remuscle them and get some weight on them.


This is one of the horses that I have now and I laugh every single time I see his before and after pics.

You would run from this-
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4142/4831508012_afc43edbd6.jpg
Somewhat better
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4980676977_60a18224f2.jpg
Much better
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2650/5711204495_bd493bd04f.jpg

Today
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5142/5872738947_467fe43e71.jpg

The group of us who do ride for CANTER MA are really experienced with ottb's of every shape, size and temperament. We don't just "ride" them we really do put some actual training on them. It's so fun to see how they all turn out.

I know we have a super nice bunch of horses down in NC. I wanted to ad that our horses ownership transfers and we are okay with resale. No crazy stipulations and vettings always encouraged.

judybigredpony
Jun. 26, 2011, 09:19 PM
Good things KCO58 I buy alot over 75 in the last 8 years.I buy make and sell TB for sport horses. I do it full time, its no a hobby..

Do remember that in most cases the current trainer may not have had this horses his whole career. This trainer can only tell you about horse while under his care. Don't even try to back track thru the other trainers its an act of futilety and they may not tell you a thing.

Be prepared on the 1st trip to have your cash and trailer. Have a vet lined up.
Alot of trainers will be way more receptive to a serious buyer who comes prepared...those who require multiple trips fall under tire kickers and may not even get a return call.

Some tracks have very strict rules regarding unlicensed visits..Penn National allows you 3 visits a year!!
Call them and ask and I do believe charlestown who is owned by the same parent company will follow suit.

Ultium is awesome and now $24.00 bag...Equine Senior also works well and so will Strategy also Wellsolve low starch low sugar if a big ulcer problem looms.
Teeth you gotta get a good proper float most OTTB get floats in front but not a comprehensive float of the far back molars.
De-Worm power Pk they frequently get Ivermection on occassion.

The best recipe of all Dr. Green and Dr. Time.....no shoes, no stress a friend and some quiet time to re adjust to being a horse.
Don't fret and get crazy over weight loose, they will go through a metobolic track withdrawl and you will be flushing a ton of money down the drain trying to keep the weight up.
Good food in normal amounts, really top quality hay...do not fear alfalfa...and grass alot of grass.
They will turn around.

GreyStreet
Jun. 27, 2011, 10:16 AM
I am really appreciating all the information on this thread, as well. I am currently not in the position to consider a CANTER horse, but it is something I am thinking about far into the future, so this wealth of information and personal experience is great!

RunForIt
Jun. 27, 2011, 11:20 AM
The director of CANTER Mid-Atlantic posts on here frequently and I know where she lives :D:D if you'd like an intro!

Same for CANTER Ohio :D :cool:

OTTB FTW
Jun. 27, 2011, 08:04 PM
Most things seem covered already.
Show up, be on time, and very courteous so that trainers will continue to be willing to show horses to us.
I look up the horse's sire and dam, # times raced, bloodlines, check http://www.pedigreequery.com/ for sire pics.
I also look up the owner and trainer. If someone who regularly goes to the track can go with you, they will know which trainers to stay away from, and which handle the horses well, stop racing before they break, give good care etc.
Some trainers will let you go see the horses work out which is nice, either on the track or the exerciser.
CANTER NE has a great blog with lots of suggestions on going to the track and OTTB training. http://canterne.org/blog/?paged=2 My mare is the model for the blog entry about "Before and After, How will your horse look after transitioned...." I keep forgetting to send in new pics, as she is 6yo now and looks so different again!
Oh, and please be ready to be summoned by all kinds of "individuals" selling horses. You will not look like the "track folk" so will be obviously looking to buy. Some don't take no for an answer easily lol.
Its great when you can talk to the "guy who works for the trainer who stables next door". Some are happy to give you info on drugs administered, if the exercise riders like to ride the horse, etc.
Keep us posted!

Lazy-Pony
Jun. 28, 2011, 12:12 AM
This thread should really be made into a sticky! I purchased my first OTTB ever last fall, and prior to doing so, I scoured COTH for as much information as I could glean! I know very little in comparison to other posters, but all of this information has been true in my case. My mare got 8 months off before her first ride- we built up turnout gradually, and now she lives outside with the option to come into her own stall. She had a ton of weight fluctuations, and is now very happy with 2lbs of beet pulp a day and Purina Enrich with a daily heaping of alfalfa grass hay and plenty of turnout in the field. I think she is especially happy in her new life and has recently become an absolute gem on the trails! We are working towards becoming a hunter/jumper, but who knows, she might end up being the world's prettiest trail horse :)
I think I got lucky, and if I were to ever do it again, I would not hesitate to use New Vocations (whose book was a Godsend!) or CANTER.
I still have a lot to learn, but my goodness, after all these years I feel good about something *and* I just might be learning a thing or two about the value of patience!

caffeinated
Jun. 28, 2011, 09:29 AM
Oh, and please be ready to be summoned by all kinds of "individuals" selling horses. You will not look like the "track folk" so will be obviously looking to buy. Some don't take no for an answer easily lol.

Ain't that the truth! heh. They also have radar for when you are trying to leave. I can spend three hours back there and talk to two people, then in the ten minutes it takes to walk back to my car, I get stopped by a dozen. heh.

But this is why I tell people, even if you don't see horses on the listings that totally call to you, it's still worth going to look at them - not only do they typically look better in person, but guaranteed you will find a bunch of other horses to look at once people realize you're shopping.

Fourbeats
Jun. 28, 2011, 06:25 PM
Wonderful post! I have one OTTB mare now and have been watching the Canter sites for a second one to purchase sometime in the next year. My biggest problem is none are anywhere near me and flying all over the country to look at horses is difficult with my schedule. It's nice to know there are people out there who are willing to help make the process a bit smoother.

eventrider
Jun. 29, 2011, 06:41 AM
If I were you I would contact Lisa Reid at www.reidtowin.com . You have seen many of the OTTB's that I have gotten from her!!!

Christan

FairWeather
Jun. 29, 2011, 09:49 AM
What a great thread! Lots of really good info here :)

Getting a horse off of the track when you don't know what to expect can be a really worrisome experience--especially when you are a month into the ride and your horse is looking like hell and gimping around the field and you think you've made a giant mistake :)

I think you might be right in my area, yes? Feel free to contact me with questions anytime!

One misconception I do want to address was mentioned earlier:
If you are willing to take a horse that is sound on some old injuries go with NV or CANTER owned horses and save yourself some of the transition and pay less.

While it's true that some of our horses have some old injuries, a majority of them are clean-legged and sound. We give them a ton of time off, then bring them back slowly by hacking out daily, then introducing ring work and jumping and progressing to off the farm trips and XC Schooling. An example of the brains we produce--these are 4 year olds out for the very first time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYPpNPLg0VQ&feature=youtu.be

We charge a little more than what you can pick up off the track, but they are ready to go--often ready to compete :)

judybigredpony
Jun. 29, 2011, 11:39 AM
We charge a little more than what you can pick up off the track, but they are ready to go--often ready to compete

There are alot of us who re-sell for not much more than what it is going to cost you for 90 days of full board, and some re-start.
Giving the horse its De-Tox/De-stress time off, pull hind shoes, re-shoe fronts and start to get toe back, de-worm, and get a basic flat and intro to X-rails, etc.
Lets the buyer have an opportunity to actually sit on the horse, see it ridden or free jump and have the luxory of an off track PPE.
Yes our prices are just a scouch bit more than 501C in most cases since we have to buy the horses,they aren't donated free.

We take the buyer remorse and worry/fear out of the equation.

Mid-Atlantic Rescue in Chesapeake City MD is also an awesome resource.

This board is a great sounding place to sus out the best places to get a real value and help get steered clear of potential land-mines :)

ACMEeventing
Jun. 29, 2011, 09:06 PM
So much great information. As Pegasusmom mentioned, there will soon be some yummy fields just waiting to be munched by a couple new prospects!

brightskyfarm
Jun. 29, 2011, 10:23 PM
Great thread and super responses.

Let me add. On visiting the track ...do Not take your kids, your mother, your dog...basically --- take you, your trainer, meet a canter rep, trailer and cash, have a vet on call. If its a distance for you, the canter rep can find a dry stall for you nearby.

Your canter rep can also enlist an exercise rider who would be glad for $10 to give the horse a few turns in the ring ..for $20 will put a horse through transitions and other requests of yours. As Emily stated, one cannot ride without a license.

Trainers really dont want to hear your life story, your past horses, or even what you plan on doing with Dobbin -- they want to know if you are interested, and buying. Period.

Track horses are also used to a 32 ac *field* for riding -- big, open areas. No lunging, we avoid small circles or sharp turns ..at least until the stifles/all other muscles have adjusted to their new riding disciplines.

Track horses are used to quick tack, mount, get the job done, and their cool out routine, then their hay bag and morning feed!
Before I forgot, its important to mention that when you do trailer your new horse home (or to anywhere) -- they will be thinking they are off to a race somewhere! Proper cooling out willl settle them... bath, walk, water, walk, more walk, graze, til they are *quiet* --- Then, you can stall, hay and feed.

Track horses get 6-7hours of attention each morning. Another hour at night feed. They are pampered, spolied, each lump and bump attended to, they are clean (soapy bath every day) ! Their feet are picked minimum twice daily! Their stalls are huge piles of fluffy straw(some up to 3 bales!), soft to lay on, warm in the winter. They wear fly sheets, coolers, winter sheets, double winter sheets. They have magnetic blankets, heat blankets, ice boots, stand in ice tubs, are rubbed, poulticed, sweated and tended to like kings and queens.
Their days are routine, they are fed the same time, the same way, the same everything every day. And!! they enjoy that! All these things take time to readjust to a new lifestyle too.

ottbnaturally
Jun. 29, 2011, 11:08 PM
Wonderful topic! I have had the "pleasure" of owning 2 OTTB's. My first - a filly I "purchased" in 2000 before I really "knew" any better! When the "sellers" family pulled up chairs to "watch us load" her - - I should have had a clue about what our lives were going to be like lol!


But - - I was in love and was going to die trying to make it work!
I was honored with her in my life for 4 years until she died as a result of freak barn accident.

I now have the pleasure of owning "Wilson" - he of the Bev Straus "From FHI to Slaughter" fame! He's not perfect, but he's mine and we adore him at the barn! I would not trade him for all the money in the world!

I have recently started "learning" how to event and he is not physically able! So - - I drool daily over the Canter and MidAtlantic sites (and harass Suzanne K. and Bev and now Allie lol) and dream of a day when I will get to drive up to one of the farms and get my next partner!

But - - as one poster said - - you have to be in it for the long haul. Take your time - - months even, tons of rides and you will know when it's right!! That "perfect" - for you - horse is out there!

Wilson has lots of issues now - he's 13, suffers from severe anhidrosis in the hellish summers of coastal South Carolina, is definitely "high maintenance" most summer days - - but - - he's mine - he's earned the right to live out a happy peaceful life and when I got him - I felt strongly from Day 1 that he was my responsibility from here on out!

But - - you guys have given me a TON to think about as I hopefully move towards adding to our small family! "Dreaming" about cantering over a nice little tadpole course is one thing - actually taking the very serious steps of getting there is another!

Owning an OTTB is huge responsibility - they all deserve to have the right home once their "work is done"!

Thanks to all of you who are willing to put yourselves out there to have this wealth of knowledge to share with others to help promote happy outcomes for these beautiful animals!!

OTTB FTW
Jun. 30, 2011, 09:38 AM
Ain't that the truth! heh. They also have radar for when you are trying to leave. I can spend three hours back there and talk to two people, then in the ten minutes it takes to walk back to my car, I get stopped by a dozen. heh.

But this is why I tell people, even if you don't see horses on the listings that totally call to you, it's still worth going to look at them - not only do they typically look better in person, but guaranteed you will find a bunch of other horses to look at once people realize you're shopping.

:lol: "Hey lady come over, nice horse, beautiful, just one minute...insert frantic gesturing from the man who hasn't bathed in months and is missing most of his teeth....horse for sale, here! come here! now man is walking toward you and just may grab your arm..." (no disrespect here, its just quite an experience when you go the first time) I LOVE the track!

YES!! you must look at them despite their pics on the websites. 9 times out of 10 they look MUCH better in person!

NMK
Jun. 30, 2011, 10:13 AM
If you live anywhere near a track with a CANTER program, I suggest going with a volunteer and just tagging along. We can always use help with listing horses, and its a great way to get to know what goes on there. Finding the right horse sometimes requires patience, knowledge and a bit of luck. I chased one of mine down for almost two years after seeing him at TDN.

Badger
Jun. 30, 2011, 01:21 PM
Love the Wilson update, thank you!