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keepthelegend
Jun. 22, 2011, 11:58 AM
Have a eventer/pony jumper that I would like to donate, but most schools seem hunter orientated. Are there any that would accept her? She is not limited by being a pony and can carry a good sized rider and jump a big course.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jun. 22, 2011, 12:08 PM
Mount Holyoke College up in MA has a xc course and a dressage team. I would suspect they might take an event focused horse/pony if it fits in their program.

http://athletics.mtholyoke.edu/facilities/equestrian_center/index

I would really explore what any college does with the pony if they no longer fit in their program.

Bacchus
Jun. 22, 2011, 01:27 PM
If you care about the horse, definitely explore what happens to the horse if they can't use it or it gets hurt. Read their contract VERY carefully. I've heard some horror stories -- there are a few on here:(

scubed
Jun. 22, 2011, 02:07 PM
I just saw in Sidelines mag an ad for someone who "brokers" donations for colleges. Don't know if they are aboveboard or what, but they may have some ideas.

EQUESTRIAN COLLEGE RECRUITER LLC - is looking for some nice school horses that are serviceably sound. These horses can compete on the flat through jumping 3’6”. Many colleges are looking for mounts to replace some of their school horses that are retiring. I have placed about 8 horses in the last few months. You get the satisfaction of finding your horse a new home where he will be well cared for and loved and you may qualify for a tax write off. This is a free service and colleges are anxiously waiting on some new arrivals. Please visit www.EquestrianCollegeRecruiter.com and click on the donation link.

netg
Jun. 22, 2011, 02:32 PM
I replied on the hunter forum - Dartmouth tends to have more eventers than hunters. They do dressage and IHSA, so the more adjustable horses the better. They also have folks who fox hunt and some other activities, so a horse who isn't "only" a hunter is good there. I've heard the cross country jumps aren't there anymore which is a shame because we had fun with them, but they still have many trails to ride on.

I have no idea what kind of a contract you can make with them, but donated horses tended to have a combination of retirement to pastures and resales to private homes who were perfect for them. I actually was very tempted to buy one of the horses when I graduated, because he could be difficult on the ground for other people but for whatever reason totally behaved for me, and he was fabulous under saddle.

FoxChaser
Jun. 22, 2011, 02:33 PM
Midway will take eventers and you don't even have to drive far!!! :) Otterbein does too (have a friend who donated her horse to their program). Good luck to you!!

Carol Ames
Jun. 22, 2011, 03:07 PM
Lake Erie has a long history of eventing; two horses I owned/ tr:yes:ained/ worked with/ sold are there/ last time I checked; Warning I HAVE NO IDEA :oWHO, IS IN CHARGE OF THE PROGRAM NOW, HOW THE SCHOOL HORSES ARE CARED FOR; used, etc. so, make a visit and watch lots:lol: of lessons/ classes

Beam Me Up
Jun. 22, 2011, 03:28 PM
We had a bad experience donating to Dartmouth (which may have nothing to do with your situation)--feel free to PM me.

SuperEventer
Jun. 22, 2011, 03:42 PM
Wilson College has an Eventing Team and is now a regional Pony Club center. They always find homes for retired school horses. I graduated from there, and am a big fan of the director there. www.wilson.edu
If you have any questions, you can PM me! :)

SevenDogs
Jun. 22, 2011, 03:47 PM
If you care about the horse, definitely explore what happens to the horse if they can't use it or it gets hurt. Read their contract VERY carefully. I've heard some horror stories -- there are a few on here:(

X2!

Make sure you have everything in writing, even if the current program is good. Program directors change semi-regularly and things can be very different down the road.

Further, don't assume that the written contract is being followed. Make sure that you keep very close tabs on your horse throughout his/her lifetime.

Wheel Whip
Jun. 22, 2011, 04:25 PM
Many college horses go to auctions when no longer needed. Try free leasing to a local Pony Clubber. The tax write off is not worth the heartbreak

eventer@heart
Jun. 22, 2011, 04:55 PM
University of New Hampshire - runs several sanctioned events each year, also.

keepthelegend
Jun. 22, 2011, 07:06 PM
Thank you! Sent a bunch of emails and videos off. Hopefully something works out.

JanWeber
Jun. 22, 2011, 10:21 PM
2nd the suggestion to free-lease the pony to a Pony Club kid. Anything donated to a college has to earn its keep - if not consistently rideable, it goes "down the road". We know how hard it is to rehome a beloved personal horse - what makes you think a college program will try particularly hard?

mg
Jun. 23, 2011, 12:19 AM
I second UNH! I donated my mare there several years ago and they LOVE her. She is regularly shown by students in the UNH hosted HTs :) They have a real blast at that school. Both the IDA and IHSA teams have eventers on them. Both teams are also very competitive. Chris Keim and Sarah Hamilton are real class acts who really care about their horses.


I replied on the hunter forum - Dartmouth tends to have more eventers than hunters. They do dressage and IHSA, so the more adjustable horses the better.

I just wanted to note that while Dartmouth may "have" a dressage team, it's been inactive for several years now. I was told by team members that it had a lot to do with when the shows were scheduled and they different academic calendar (they start/end later than most schools).

netg
Jun. 23, 2011, 04:37 AM
I just wanted to note that while Dartmouth may "have" a dressage team, it's been inactive for several years now. I was told by team members that it had a lot to do with when the shows were scheduled and they different academic calendar (they start/end later than most schools).

Dartmouth has dressage lessons. I didn't know that about the team, though. That's too bad - the team started when I was there, and gradually gained more support.

keepthelegend
Jun. 23, 2011, 07:47 AM
2nd the suggestion to free-lease the pony to a Pony Club kid. Anything donated to a college has to earn its keep - if not consistently rideable, it goes "down the road". We know how hard it is to rehome a beloved personal horse - what makes you think a college program will try particularly hard?

It's a young very sound pony so should be useful for a long time. I don't own her, just have her in my barn to sell. She came from a BNT in eventing and owner has put a lot of $$ into her and now wants a deduction rather than waiting for her to sell.

Joan from Flatlands
Jun. 23, 2011, 01:11 PM
Johnson and Wales University, Providence RI - riding program located in Rehoboth, MA has quite a few eventers as well as dressage riders - and does right by their horses!

Joan from Flatlands

BestHorses
Jun. 23, 2011, 02:43 PM
It's a young very sound pony so should be useful for a long time. I don't own her, just have her in my barn to sell. She came from a BNT in eventing and owner has put a lot of $$ into her and now wants a deduction rather than waiting for her to sell.

I looked into donating a horse to a school when I was in the situation where I didn't want to wait too long to sell a horse while the bills added up and figured the tax write-off would be easier/quicker. After some cursory research it seemed like most schools wanted you to bring the horse to them and let them have it on trial for anywhere from a couple weeks to a month or more before they would decide IF they wanted to keep it.

So if the school decided they didn't want the horse for whatever reason they could ask you to come back and get it and who knows what kind of issue the horse might have after they've "tested" it.

After mulling it over I lowered the horse's price drastically and it sold in a week to someone who couldn't believe the great deal they got. They were happy and I was happy that the horse moved on quickly so I didn't have to keep paying board and training for for him. Sometimes you just have to cut your losses.

If the pony won't sell quickly at 50-75% less than what they are currently asking either the pony is priced wayyyyyyy too high or it has some issue that a school won't want to deal with anyway. JMHO.

Duramax
Jun. 23, 2011, 05:39 PM
You can donate to a Pony Club or a PC region- in order for it to be donated there has to be a specific "child" (PC now goes up to age 25) that the horse will go to. Sounds like this pony might be a good fit for PC?

Dry Clean Only
Jun. 23, 2011, 06:33 PM
University of New Hampshire - runs several sanctioned events each year, also.

This. UNH is the most 'eventy' college I know of, when I was there IHSA was an afterthought and they teach balance seat style riding. My text book was Centered Riding:D

mg
Jun. 23, 2011, 11:14 PM
I also want to note: UNH won't discriminate against her being a pony either! A lot of schools shy away from ponies simply because not as many riders can fit on them. But UNH readily accepts cool ponies, as evidenced by the SUPER cool ponies in their program! They use quite a few of them in the therapeutic riding program as well :)

Eventer58
Jun. 25, 2011, 12:55 PM
Miami University in Oxford, Ohio or Albion College in Albion, Michigan are two other places you might consider. Both colleges have reputable equestrian programs and I'm told they take excellent care of their horses!

seeuatx
Jun. 25, 2011, 01:05 PM
VI (Virginia Intermont) had several eventers of various levels donated while I was there and we had a few large pony/ hony sized schoolies as well. If I remember right we also had a few horses just on a X number of years lease.

VicariousRider
Jun. 25, 2011, 02:09 PM
I want to reiterate that institutional memory at any school can be VERY short so get a WRITTEN AGREEMENT that gives you 1st right of refusal if they choose to sell, require that they notify you before doing anything life changing (like a sale, euthanasia, etc.).

You absolutely cannot assume that a school or any nonprofit organization will indefinitely keep the horse. As someone who worked in nonprofit development and who has studied nonprofit law because I believe in the value of these institutions, you have to know that there can be high turnover (thereby effecting significant policy changes), funding problems, and more.

There are a lot of horror stories out there but there are a lot of great ones, too. Donating a horse can be a very mutually beneficial thing just go into it with your eyes open.

SevenDogs
Jun. 25, 2011, 02:43 PM
I want to reiterate that institutional memory at any school can be VERY short so get a WRITTEN AGREEMENT that gives you 1st right of refusal if they choose to sell, require that they notify you before doing anything life changing (like a sale, euthanasia, etc.).



... and then FOLLOW UP! Stay in touch and know what the horse is doing. Do not assume that just because the written agreement says they must notify you, that it will happen. Standing there with a written agreement after a horse has gone to auction doesn't do you any good. The horse is already gone.