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View Full Version : Article: What not to wear in the summer time.



Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:49 AM
http://chronofhorse.com/article/what-not-wear-summer-schooling-attire

Um, yeah, whatever. You don't have to have a farmer's tan. You can wear tank tops. I think the author has no clue what it's like to ride in super hot temps.

I agree with the no butt crack and wardrobe malfunctions, but that's about it. Dressing to be taken seriously? Maybe if you have a lesson, but if you're schooling your own horse? Who cares? It's actually fun to dress like a lazy and crazy person and then have a horse under you who is a spectacular mover and does all the upper level movements while you're in your Dockers. :lol:

What stuff do you wear that goes against the HP's idea of proper riding attire? I think it's more fun to NOT look like a DQ sometimes--especially in the summer. ;) It's fun to shock people--but only if you and your horse can walk the talk. :yes:

AliCat518
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:59 AM
For starters, I wear low rise jeans riding sometimes and dont show crack! A belt (or stirrup leather) works pretty well at keeping my pants up! Also, I wear whatever crappy t shirts I have laying around. I get filthy at the barn and I would rather spend my horsey budget on things other than my schooling clothes. And I have been known to occasionally wear shorts with half chaps.

So shoot me. I break a ton of her fashion rules! I have my horses at home and the only people that are going to see me ride are my SO, our families and whoever we might invite out. FWIW, I was at a small, casual boarding barn before this and I wore the same stuff.

Maybe it's different at bigger barns or show barns. I just cant justify paying for nice looking stuff to wear riding. I DO look impeccable and have everything necessary for showing, but that stuff pretty much saps up my horsey attire budget!

Wayside
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:00 AM
I am the wearer of "dowdy duds" when I'm schooling at home. :lol: Although I have stepped up my attire so that I mostly wear breeches these days, I generally wear ratty old t-shirts with the sleeves cut off when it's hot out.

paulaedwina
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:00 AM
I think the article has merit. Just my opinion of course, but I try to take care of how I dress, especially when what I am doing is very important to me. That's just me of course. It's a body and spirit thing for me I guess. I make no judgment on those who disagree.

Paula

meupatdoes
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:03 AM
I completely agree with the article.

I have never in my life worn a spaghetti strap tank or shorts on a horse and I haven't gotten heat stroke yet.

Meanwhile, a neatly fitting, $10 solid color polo shirt from Target is really not any warmer OR more expensive than a sloppy t-shirt with a logo or howling wolf on it. T-shirts without logos are not warmer than t-shirts with logos. Clothes that fit aren't warmer than clothes that don't.

Every time I go to Target/Walmart/Kohl's and stand in front of piles and piles of $10 shirts, half of which are on sale for $3, I really wonder about why people think it is "too expensive" to dress neatly.

And I have lived and ridden in TX and FL, which I believe get hot enough to count.

vineyridge
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:04 AM
I come from one of the world's most miserable places for heat and humidity. People who lived in such places before the advent of electricity and Air Conditioning learned how to dress for the climate. People who had to work outside in the climate had ways of coping with the heat. For high heat and humidity, natural fabrics and looseness and very light weight woven fabric went along with long sleeves and long pants. Light colors were necessary.

So--my prescription for riding comfort--and the elements are very difficult to find these days--would be a 100% cotton, linen or silk, WOVEN, long sleeved but very loose, big shirt in white light fabric; and buff white or tan, LOOSE FITTING breeches of WOVEN fabric that will stand off the body a bit. Knits are an abomination in the summer, and so are dark fabrics. No matter what the chemical companies say, polyester does not and will not work as well natural fabric in extreme heat. Nothing works better than white as a color.

The people who manufacture riding clothing have made their products in exactly the wrong way for people to beat the heat.

Same things work for working outdoors. I actually prefer painters overalls because they are loose, don't have a waist, and are white, woven natural fabric that's often light weight.

I fail to see why the article cited was ever written or published. It offers nothing new or even helpful. Prescriptive language throughout, but without ever giving reasons why. Just because something isn't particularly attractive does not mean that it isn't practical.

paulaedwina
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:06 AM
I buy men's polo shirts because they are a tad longer and I'm quite tall. I have no objection to T-shirts. I just try to take some care in turnout.

Paula

vineyridge
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:12 AM
If you wear polo shirts, pique/waffle weave are the best, because they do stand a tiny bit off the body when they get wet.


I buy men's polo shirts because they are a tad longer and I'm quite tall. I have no objection to T-shirts. I just try to take some care in turnout.

Paula

Cruisesmom
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:16 AM
I thought this was a great article. I always wear breeches, and tall boots. But my tops are not always neat and clean. Whatever is comfortable suits me. Tanks, t-shirts, halter tops.

InWhyCee Redux
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:19 AM
Not to sound like a shill, but the C9 by Champion sleeveless "singlets" may be the best $9.99 shirts ever made— and you can wash them in the sink, dry them overnight. And they pass my trainer's "no visible bra straps" rule. ; )

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:22 AM
I've lived in the UBER hot and humid places. I never did half chaps with shorts, only shorts and full chaps. Light colored. Hot? Yeah, for the duration of the ride, then I'd rip them off at the end and my legs would be cool immediately. ;)

The khakis/Dockers are cotton, loose and breath SO much better than anything else, and they protect you from sun burn. I'll ride in them when it's hotter than hades out side and I have to ride in the full sun. I agree with Viney on loose tops. I've done the spaghetti straps with the built in shelf bra. Put a thin cotton top over it and then rip that off when you're done and back in the barn so you can cool off. Love it! Breeches and boots are NEVER comfortable on super hot days. Those who say they are probably have not ridden in sweltering temps--and especially not with super high humidity tagged on. When you can't ride in the early hours of the day, you do what you can!

BTW, Viney, I never knew you were a lumberjack. ;) Nee!

alto
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:23 AM
Love the colorful breeches (http://www.myselleria.com/zoomImg.asp?ID=1893) :yes: :yes: :yes:

InWhyCee Redux
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:23 AM
buff white or tan, LOOSE FITTING breeches of WOVEN fabric that will stand off the body a bit. Knits are an abomination in the summer, and so are dark fabrics. No matter what the chemical companies say, polyester does not and will not work as well natural fabric in extreme heat. Nothing works better than white as a color.

The people who manufacture riding clothing have made their products in exactly the wrong way for people to beat the heat.



When the people who manufacturer riding clothes make a loose-fitting breech in a woven fabric that will fit my size 10/12/14/whatever ghetto-booty, I'll jump. Until then, I'll be dying in my Irideons... :no:

CosMonster
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:29 AM
Eh, I kind of agree with her, but kind of don't. Some of it is really basic safety stuff, like always riding in long pants. That stuff should always be followed, even at home.

The lowrider jean thing was a bit odd. I only wear low riders because the way my hip to waist ratio is or something, I have a hard time finding high waisted jeans that fit. I've never mooned someone in my jeans though, that's what belts are for. And honestly even without a belt, most low riders aren't really that low.

I don't have a problem with schooling in tank tops or sports bras, though. I ride in tanks most of the summer because that's what I prefer to wear otherwise, and I'd rather not have a total farmer's tan. If you're just schooling, I don't think it's a big deal.

That said, in lessons you should absolutely wear a fitted polo shirt and breeches. Also, in certain barns there is a dress code (official or not) and I do think that in most boarding situations you should be dressed a little more nicely than you might at home. The exception would be some extremely casual backyard type barns I've seen, where it didn't really matter.

But at home? I figure as long as it's safe, I don't care that much. Though I never like to see people ride in really baggy clothing as I feel it can be a safety hazard.

edit: agreed that breeches and tall boots are not comfortable in hot temps. I ride 5-8 horses a day in the desert where summer temps are always above 90 and often above 100, and my arena has no shade (nor do my trails until I get in the canyons). I wear the lightest tights I can find, and then riding sneakers (Ariat Terrains). I often even leave off the half chaps unless I'm going to be in a saddle that I know pinches my calves. On top, I wear whatever's comfortable unless I'm showing a horse or something. The last thing I want is heat stroke.

TickleFight
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:31 AM
I am definitely guilty of wearing sports bras in the summer, especially if I'll be jumping into or over water.

In my opinion the best top to wear while riding outside in hot weather is a white, loose-fitting button down shirt. The color reflects some of the sun, and the billowy lightweight fabric allows air currents to move between the shirt and my skin.

It's the same idea as folks in the Middle Eastern deserts who cover themselves in loose fabric... it actually keeps you cooler.

Really though, articles like that only reinforce the perception that dressage is snobby.

catosis
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:46 AM
I agree with some things said in the article, but really, if you are at home, just be a total slob if you want to (within reason, of course- nothing that might be dangerous!). Obviously the writer of that article considers herself to be a bit of a fashionista, which of COURSE makes her inherently smarter than us, so therefore she has the right to judge what we wear to the barn in the summer. Obviously don't dress like you are selling something (if you know what I mean;)), but keep it cool, comfortable, and casual. Most of us are not riding at the Spanish Riding School.

Who is really going to wear their $150 Rey Bans for schooling? That is so darn impractical, especially if they go flying off your face mid-ride. However, I really did like the ridiculous colored breeches!

horsefaerie
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:47 AM
Ooohhh I want some of those breeches!

OK. I am guilty. I live in the SE and the heat and humidity are enough to make even kids nauseous in the saddle.

I wear cast iron camisoles as I cannot stand bras.

I wear corduroy breeches since the blends for summer are so incredibly hot and sticky I can't even peel them off when soaked through with sweat.

I wear jeans all year long but never in the saddle. Nothing like a misplaced seam to give you a lovely blister. However, they keep things from biting and scratching me.

Loose clothes? Nope. Bugs get under that loose fitting shirt and it is an expensive trip to the ER. Biting stinging insects are plentiful here and loosefitting clothes are more helpful to them than they are to me.

I Don't have any sneakers at the moment so I don't wear them when riding but tall boots? Perhaps not. Leather fullseats make them unnecessary.

Half chaps? Sometimes. Full chaps? Ugh!

paulaedwina
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:53 AM
It's an interesting observation one poster made about how people ride in hot countries. I am from the Caribbean and we wore breeches and tall boots when we rode.

Paula

Bogey2
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:53 AM
it's more fun to NOT look like a DQ sometimes

so I am a DQ because I like to ride in breeches and tall boots?? I am just more comfortable and more effective in them...so call me a DQ I guess.

mp
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:57 AM
Breeches and boots are NEVER comfortable on super hot days. Those who say they are probably have not ridden in sweltering temps--and especially not with super high humidity tagged on.

I ride in boots and breeches year-round even when it's hot and humid. I wouldn't say they're comfortable when it's hot, but what is? I just switch from full-seats to summer-weight breeches/riding tights. I've gotten so used to riding in the tall boots, just paddocks feel funny. And I won't be any cooler in paddocks and half chaps. After I'm done riding, I change from skin out, so it really doesn't make any difference.

Inexpensive polos/T-shirts work fine as long as it's not too hot. But those things stay damp and don't let the sweat dry fast enough when it's extremely humid. Riding shirts that wick the sweat away-- Kerrits Ventilator is the only one I can think of right now -- really are a lot cooler. They're expensive, so I buy 'em on sale whenever I can.

As for the article, what difference does it make what someone else wears? As long as your private parts are covered (as in no cracks, thank you very much) and you're not hanging around your fly-stomping horse in flip flops or sandals (I can't stand the sight of blood), I don't care.

If you're young and fit enough to ride in a sports bra, go for it. If you're not, please don't. I'm in the too old/too fat category now, so I can say that. :lol:

catosis
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:06 PM
If you're young and fit enough to ride in a sports bra, go for it. If you're not, please don't.

This!

Lost_at_C
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:11 PM
Well, according to the article it's apparently ok to be garish as long as the Joules name appears somewhere on your body... glad to know there's a sanctioned route to "self-expression" :lol:

Seriously though, for warm weather riding gear I highly recommend haunting the sales racks of sporting gear shops. Some of the stuff made for cyclists and hikers is excellent for horse riding - close fitting but very very breathable and doesn't ride up or fall down.

chancellor2
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:20 PM
Worried about Farmer's tan? Here's a word for you

SUNSCREEN

SmartAlex
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:25 PM
Jeez... I guess I'm a fashionista. Schooling tights, tall boots and sleeveless technical shirts every ride (shortsleeves leave tan lines :cool:). When I have a lesson, I dress up with a hairnet, tuck in my shirttail, and borrow my husband's belt. .......and all I do is hack up and down the roads, and gallop through the hayfields.

When I was a kid... different story. Of course I couldn't afford "real" riding clothes. Really, the advances in hot weather riding fabric is amazing. I could wear that stuff all day!

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:25 PM
It's an interesting observation one poster made about how people ride in hot countries. I am from the Caribbean and we wore breeches and tall boots when we rode.

Paula

Yeah, well, you get a tropical breeze there and the temps typically do not go into the 110 range and stay there. :eek: Not from what I've heard. :lol:

I had too many close calls and heat strokes. I'm all for keeping cool and watching how long I'm in the sun. I also don't care if I'm at an uber expensive DQ barn with my horse. They can all kill themselves for fashion. NOTHING is worth heat stroke. Then again, if I'm teaching, I'll wear appropriate thin breeches, etc., but I can be out of the sun most of the time when I teach and I do not wear boots.

If I'm training, I try to do that early in the day and then you can wear the half chaps and paddock boots--or you can also skip the half chaps.

I don't think that any one looks good if they are stroking out and on the way to the hospital in an ambulance. And I don't really think the ER personnel are impressed with breeches and boots. :lol:

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:26 PM
Worried about Farmer's tan? Here's a word for you

SUNSCREEN

Yeah, but then that's NO TAN. And some of us still like a bit of color in the summer. You can not like it, that's your perogative, but don't judge everyone by your own standards of whiteness. :D

Justmyluck
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:36 PM
I've lived in the UBER hot and humid places. I never did half chaps with shorts, only shorts and full chaps. Light colored. Hot? Yeah, for the duration of the ride, then I'd rip them off at the end and my legs would be cool immediately. ;)

The khakis/Dockers are cotton, loose and breath SO much better than anything else, and they protect you from sun burn. I'll ride in them when it's hotter than hades out side and I have to ride in the full sun. I agree with Viney on loose tops. I've done the spaghetti straps with the built in shelf bra. Put a thin cotton top over it and then rip that off when you're done and back in the barn so you can cool off. Love it! Breeches and boots are NEVER comfortable on super hot days. Those who say they are probably have not ridden in sweltering temps--and especially not with super high humidity tagged on. When you can't ride in the early hours of the day, you do what you can!

BTW, Viney, I never knew you were a lumberjack. ;) Nee!


I live in Central Florida and ride in breeches and boots. at 3 in the afternoon.

englishcowgirl
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:39 PM
I am this authors worst nightmare.... cut off shorts, sports bra and I think she would consider my entire wardrobe tacky. I always wear a helmet and at least some sort of heeled riding boots. Of course my dressage mare also runs barrels, and my second horse was a freebie. So I guess we are that tacky team that shows up and everyone looks down on:( I love dressage for the way that it improves my horses and I and makes us a better team. Coming from a redneck town I got used to that attitude real young.

carolprudm
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:48 PM
I love my equissentials equicool full seats, with an Under Armor heat gear tee or tank, sorry, not tucked in and paddock boots, no half chaps. Their moleskin breeches are a little more concealing but not as cool.

FWIW I do keep my horses at home but trailer out for lessons.

Silly me I think any instructor would rather see me in less than propper attire than have to call the rescue squad because I passed out

joiedevie99
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:50 PM
Article seems totally reasonable to me. I wouldn't consider any of those things proper riding attire, nor would I consider showing up at the barn in any of them (including the wild color breeches referenced at the end).

quietann
Jun. 20, 2011, 12:53 PM
So... sources for *lightweight* long-sleeved shirts in breathable fabrics? That fit a size 10P curvy short woman? I'm getting the evil eye from my dermatologist about riding outside during the day. Yes, I do wear sunscreen!

Agree with another poster that sporting goods shops sometimes have nice "technical fabric" shirts available, and on sale they are not that expensive.

I agree w/the author of the article that b**t cracks and bra straps really aren't appropriate... for any public setting, really.

I wear summer weight breeches -- oddly enough, the Equissentials riding tights are not too hot, even though they are black. Mine have the unicorn/pegasus pattern "full seat" stamped on them, in purple and in red, so I guess there are barns where that would be a no-no... but I think they're cute. Usually I wear my tall boots unless I am being lazy, and a short sleeve t-shirt or polo, or a tank top if it's late in the day or I'll be inside. What I have is mostly stained from being worn at the barn and getting green-slimed by my horse. The least comfortable part of my summer get-up is my bra, but at 34D I don't have a lot of choice about that :)

The one thing I won't do in the summer, no matter what, is tuck my shirt in.

carolprudm
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:02 PM
Am I the only one who thinks the brightly colored breeches and Joules polo's in the links are UGLY?

SERIOUSLY????

wildlifer
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:03 PM
HA! Well, I guess I just love to make people like the author cry. I guess she's got nothing better to worry about, ROFL. I will wear whatever it takes to get me through Carolina summers and she can kiss my patootie.

Technical wicking fabrics are AWESOME. If you want a near-endless supply of inexpensive tanks/bras/etc for cheap in nice technical fabrics, go check out running stuff. Much cheaper than silly horse stuff. I order lots of bargains from www.sierratradingpost.com.

In the meantime, I'll be out there in my technical tights and floppy tank top with horse snot and jump paint smeared on it. Enjoying every second. It makes it even better knowing Miss Priss is wrinkling her little nose.

kinnip
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:06 PM
I wish someone would pay me to write two pages of drivel.
I do have to wonder though, how do you all wear shorts and half chaps without getting rubs and a heat rash?
Oh, and I don't give a crap if my farmer's tan is ugly! I earned every line and freckle.

Bogey2
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:21 PM
I would think chaps with shorts is a lot hotter to ride in than breeches and boots...plus who wants leather right against the skin when they are sweating? gross and ouch!
I prefer the tech fabrics over cotton as well, my husband plays a lot of golf and gets credits to the pro shops...I have him pick me up a golf shirt now and then (made from the tech fabric)

Janet
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:23 PM
I have two drawers of shirts.

One drawer has the ones that are new enough to wear "in public". I wear those for a lesson, or if I am riding in public.

The other has the ones that are still decent, but have tattered collars or cuffs, or stains that won't come off. Those are the ones I wear for barnwork and riding in private.

I see no point in throwing out the slightly tattered ones, nor in risking damage to the "good" ones by riding in them when nobody is watching.

danceronice
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:28 PM
Yeah, well, you get a tropical breeze there and the temps typically do not go into the 110 range and stay there. :eek: Not from what I've heard. :lol:

I had too many close calls and heat strokes. I'm all for keeping cool and watching how long I'm in the sun. I also don't care if I'm at an uber expensive DQ barn with my horse. They can all kill themselves for fashion. NOTHING is worth heat stroke. Then again, if I'm teaching, I'll wear appropriate thin breeches, etc., but I can be out of the sun most of the time when I teach and I do not wear boots.



Having experienced heat prostration (thank God for a BO who's also an RN) I'll keep my loose-fitting cotton t-shirts or work shirts and ride in jeans (my Wranglers are a lot more comfortable for riding than any other style I've found) and low boots or my THIN THIN THIN schooling tights. I never wear belts or need them anyway (unless they're strictly costume pieces worn OVER everything) and I can ride just as well without the tall boots as with them. I also love my very vented lightweight Troxel that gets a good breeze going, and I have learned my lesson about riding in a super-high humidity situation (don't.) If we're both dripping just walking to the ring, and you can practically see the air, it's too hot and humid, go hose off the horse and go home where there's A/C. I need to learn to take hints from a horse who spent most of his life up to now in Florida--if he's too hot, I'm too hot.

As far as tans go, I get a mild one with sunscreen on. But overall, there should be no tanning going on ever unless it's out of a bottle. I'll take the relatively low risk of cancer from DHA than the high risk from actual sunlight.

Perfect Pony
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:32 PM
When the people who manufacturer riding clothes make a loose-fitting breech in a woven fabric that will fit my size 10/12/14/whatever ghetto-booty, I'll jump. Until then, I'll be dying in my Irideons... :no:

I have 2 pairs of Golden Dress and 1 pair of Euro-Star knee patch Euro-Seat breeches that are loose fitting microfiber fabric and pleated, they fit like a pair of khaki pants and are so wonderful for summer. Unfortunately I lost 30lbs last year and they are 32R (and I am now a 28).

catosis
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:32 PM
so I am a DQ because I like to ride in breeches and tall boots?? I am just more comfortable and more effective in them...so call me a DQ I guess.

It is a personal choice, and that is the point we are all trying to make here. The whole undertone of the article itself was snooty and contemptuous of those who commit the equestrian fashion faux pas as decided by the author. If you choose to school in breeches in boots during the summer, more power to you: I personally school in such attire as well. However, when an author goes so far as to tell readers what is appropriate for the barn no matter the circumstances and suggests that we all dress like Paris Hiltons on horseback, people will respond in a derisive manner. :yes:

Perfect Pony
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:37 PM
Here is the brand/style, Golden Dress "Sara"
http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-GOLDEN-DRESS-SARA-Micro-K-P-Breech-Taupe-32-R-/360156374583?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53dafe2637

They are seriously the most comfortable, lightweight and COOL breeches for summer riding, I am so bummed mine don't fit me anymore and have been looking for smaller ones.

GraceLikeRain
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:38 PM
I don't care if it is 100+ and HUMID (not unheard during July in Georgia), I would never wear a tank top/baggy t-shirt/shorts and half chaps/etc. I wear a polo, breeches, and tall boots every.single.ride. Looking sloppy won't stop me from sweating.

Whether I am in the ring or hacking around the property there is always a chance that I will be seen by a passing car, neighbor, or a potential new barn member. In my opinion it would be selfish (not to mention tasteless) for me to strut around in a tank top to stay "cooler" while representing my barn.

So for me it is a total no brainer. It is as easy as a polo and light-weight breeches in the summer and a polo, sweater, and heavy full-seat breeches in the winter. My "uniform" keeps me comfortable in everything from 25-100 degrees and all my polos are inexpensive new shirts from Target or used Ralph Lauren, Polo brand, Lacoste, etc (all of which I picked up for < $15 a piece). I also put my hair up in a hair net, use conservative colored saddle pads, and groom my mare to the 9s. This is my passion and I take my appearance seriously.


For example: The picture below is from a clinic I organized and I had < 10 min to get ready once I was done helping everyone get settled and paperwork filled out
http://i1222.photobucket.com/albums/dd486/GraceLikeRain1990/IMG_3442.jpg
Sure I could have tossed on a tank top and pink saddle pad but IMHO this looks so much better

Lost_at_C
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:54 PM
So congratulations, good for you. But many have different motivations and/or constraints and being well-groomed is often the last thing true horsepeople take the time for. I know a great many horsewomen with sparkling well-braided steeds who look like they themselves have just stepped out of a tsunami.

I for one could care less what someone is wearing - I care what sort of horseman they are, and what sort of human being. As long as someone is "decent" I think clothing is pretty irrelevant. Now granted, I have in the past wondered what the heck I could possibly have in common with someone who has the money, time and lack of imagination to spend hours on their surface appearance, but in some cases they turn out to have real souls as well. ;)

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:59 PM
I don't care if it is 100+ and HUMID (not unheard during July in Georgia), I would never wear a tank top/baggy t-shirt/shorts and half chaps/etc. I wear a polo, breeches, and tall boots every.single.ride. Looking sloppy won't stop me from sweating.

Whether I am in the ring or hacking around the property there is always a chance that I will be seen by a passing car, neighbor, or a potential new barn member. In my opinion it would be selfish (not to mention tasteless) for me to strut around in a tank top to stay "cooler" while representing my barn.

So for me it is a total no brainer. It is as easy as a polo and light-weight breeches in the summer and a polo, sweater, and heavy full-seat breeches in the winter. My "uniform" keeps me comfortable in everything from 25-100 degrees and all my polos are inexpensive new shirts from Target or used Ralph Lauren, Polo brand, Lacoste, etc (all of which I picked up for < $15 a piece). I also put my hair up in a hair net, use conservative colored saddle pads, and groom my mare to the 9s. This is my passion and I take my appearance seriously.


For example: The picture below is from a clinic I organized and I had < 10 min to get ready once I was done helping everyone get settled and paperwork filled out
http://i1222.photobucket.com/albums/dd486/GraceLikeRain1990/IMG_3442.jpg
Sure I could have tossed on a tank top and pink saddle pad but IMHO this looks so much better

I just have to say that I'm glad my self worth and the reputation of the barn's I board at (and they are VERY nice ones) are not influenced by what I wear. :lol:

Natalie A
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:02 PM
My trainer alway laughs at me when she sees me outside of the barn because I'm way more dressed up than she ever sees me! I like to look put together (nice breeches, technical t shirts) basically at the barn, but nothing special. Not as put together as days when I won't be covered in slobber, that's for sure. But presentable enough to walk into Starbucks without getting weird looks.

But I think a lot has to do with barn culture. I'm at a super-casual (but safe) barn and would definitely up my fashionable-ness at another barn if that was the expectation.

eponacelt
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:02 PM
I think a lot of what the author is talking about is the sense that many people have that dressing well (whether for riding or going to the grocery store) implies a certain sense of self worth and self confidence.

While I don't wholeheartedly subscribe to the philosophy (well, actually I do, but don't always live up to it) I believe there have been studies done that say a little time invested in looking good can lead to better self-esteem, a better work ethic and generally a more positive outlook. That's why business attire is business attire.

Speaking personally, I feel like when I put on a polo (nice, lightweight, wicking summer fabric made for golfers) and lightweight breeches, and boots or half chaps, I feel more "professional", even though I'm an ammy. To myself, it says that I take my riding seriously, which I do. That's not to say that I spend a fortune on clothing for the barn, nor do I necessarily look down on those who don't "dress" for riding. But when I boarded, people's dress said a lot about their motivation, goals and ambitions.

Frankly, the people I boarded with fell into a few categories - completely recreational riders who just hung out at the barn and trail rode occasionally. The ones who, IMHO, were better horsepeople, were the ones who always looked "tidy", either in jeans, shorts, tanks, whatever. They dressed respectfully for the riding they were doing.

The other category were the "show people". Those of us who took lessons, and made concerted efforts to progress up a training scale, whether that was for dressage or jumpers or hunters. This is just a casual observation, but the people who were generally more successful, had a better attitude and did better with their riding overall, were the people who tended to dress "better". And this had nothing to do with whether they had an expensive horse, a cheap horse, lots of money, or ate ramen noodles in order to support their horse habit. And they weren't being pressured to dress a certain way because of any trainer - we didn't have one at the barn.

From a non-horse perspective, I know that even though its perfectly acceptable in my job to wear jeans every day, I feel more professional and act that way if I put a little attention into my wardrobe and dressing slightly nicer than I absolutely have to.

So, for all of you who think tanks, and floppy tees, etc are fine - well, that's great. Clearly it works for you.

For me, I'll keep my polos, boots and breeches, even in the miserable Virginia summers.

PS - Whoever asked about lightweight long sleeve shirts - check out clothing for hiking and fly-fishing. Sierra Trading Post is the best online for bargain prices.

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:05 PM
I for one could care less what someone is wearing - I care what sort of horseman they are, and what sort of human being. As long as someone is "decent" I think clothing is pretty irrelevant. Now granted, I have in the past wondered what the heck I could possibly have in common with someone who has the money, time and lack of imagination to spend hours on their surface appearance, but in some cases they turn out to have real souls as well. ;)

In the horse world, I'm impressed with how well people ride and how happy the horses are in their work.

Huh, I wonder what the author would think about a clinician that is representing the USDF showing up and teaching people without wearing breeches and boots. To me, that's when it's unprofessional and tacky. When it's your own horse, on your own time, then you can do what you want. When you are representing a business or something as large as the USDF, I'm really disappointed when I see people dressed in street clothes and teaching. :no: They don't have to have on boots, unless their on a horse, but breeches are a must in my mind when teaching.

CosMonster
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:16 PM
So wait, what's so bad about tank tops anyway? People are acting like they're this horrible fashion faux pas but they're pretty standard attire for women during the summer in my part of the world. Of course I am out west in a pretty casual area (you can tell people are dressed up because they break out the white straw cowboy hats :lol:) but I had no idea I was so trashy because I rarely wear shirts with sleeves or collars during the summer. :winkgrin:

That said, I do agree that the way you dress can affect your state of mind. I'm obviously a lot more casual than a lot of folks on here, but I do pay attention to my appearance. For example, wearing really baggy tee shirts makes me lazy and sleepy because that's sleepwear in my mind. :lol:

Generally though I try not to judge people on what they wear, especially when we're talking about sporting activities such as horseback riding. Comfort and safety are the only true concerns IMO.

edit: In fact I just got back from riding several horses in dirty blue jeans and a tie dye tank top. :eek: My poor horses!

Mukluk
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:17 PM
Well If I'm taking the girl swimming, I am going to wear appropriate attire- like shorts and a tank top. Riding with a bareback pad is more comfortable if you are going to ride with shorts. Some of my friends ride in shorts in western saddles with a towel over the saddle and cowboy boots. Sometimes I wear shorts just because I can but I normally wear breeches and half chaps. I wear whatever top is comfortable and lots of sunscreen. I doubt the horse cares what you are wearing.

GraceLikeRain
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:51 PM
I just have to say that I'm glad my self worth and the reputation of the barn's I board at (and they are VERY nice ones) are not influenced by what I wear. :lol:

:lol: Well maybe you weren't aware of the reputation you were creating. I would rather not take that risk. I believe dressing appropriately demonstrates respect for the facilities, owner, and my horse.

Perhaps I am crazy but I don't think I will ever look back and think "man i wish I had put on a spaghetti strap tank top so my chest was hanging out for the world to see when that potential boarder stopped" ;). Better safe than sorry

Also, "self worth" :confused:...nice try at a low blow but it didn't quite have the sting you intended :D



ETA: eponacelt I completely agree, very well written

TrakHack
Jun. 20, 2011, 03:11 PM
I like dressing myself and my horse nicely and conservatively. My philosophy has always been I may not be the best rider and I may not have the best horse, but we can look damn good in everything we do.

Bogey2
Jun. 20, 2011, 03:30 PM
I think of riding as my sport, if I did not maybe I would be more carefree about what I wear. It's a very physical sport...like cycling...I think I would have to adhere to the dress code. Cycling (competitively) in jeans would hurt:eek:
When I sail with my brother I get a talking to if I have the wrong footwear..not because of how it looks but because I might slip or *gasp* scuff up the boat:lol:

WILLOW&CAL
Jun. 20, 2011, 03:31 PM
I also agree with GraceLikeRain. I may not always land up as clean and pressed as she does on her photo but I always start out that way:). If the occasion calls for it I'll strip down to a strappy top for a ride in the dam or for bathing my horse but I think its important to look neat and professional while schooling. My instructor moans at me if I wear something baggy because she can't see if I'm sitting completely straight and not collapsing in the hip or slouching. The article is not the height of relevance or importance but it raises an interesting point about the correctness of the attire for the purpose of dressage. Your shirt may be the scraping of the bottom of the sales barrel but IMHO it should be clean and have its sleeves still attached. I also don't judge a rider's attire on the same level as I judge their horsemanship skills but there is such a thing as inappropriate clothes to school in-shorts/jewellery/bikini tops/trainers/slops.

saanengirl
Jun. 20, 2011, 03:58 PM
During the week I school in jeans and a button-down collared shirt because I work at a University, and feel like breeches might not be the best attire for the setting. Jeans are acceptable for those of us in Agriculture. They can get uncomfortable when I start to sweat though... On weekends I school in light colored, light weight riding tights or breeches that are my designated schooling breeches, and a tank top, t-shirt, or polo. I never wear tall boots for schooling. For my lessons I wear breeches/riding tights, paddock boots with or without half chaps, and a fitted shirt. Sometimes I wear a t-shirt for lessons, but I do not wear a tank top. I always wear a helmet regardless.

When I am giving lessons, I wear either jeans and a button-down shirt (at the University) or breeches and a polo (at home) with my paddock boots.

HiyoSilver
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:08 PM
I am with Velvet- light coloured cotton pants, cotton long sleeved woven shirts, paddock boots with cotton socks and cotton fishnet gloves- and a helmet with good airflow.

One time I was wearing the regulation breeches, tall boots and polo shirt, with a sports bra and it was SO HOT, like-o-my-god-Scarlet-we-must-be-in-a-southern-drama hot, so I peeled off the polo top. Now, my ring is in my backyard and quite private. Hubby's boss chose that day to show up on the property and see my lovely sports bra...

Canaqua
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:09 PM
I really could care less what others wear, as long as I don't have to look at butt cracks hanging out or large muffin tops hanging over breeches under a crop top.

Personally, I wear breeches and boots every time I ride, there's really nothing to put on the bottom half that is all that much cooler without getting my legs all chewed up. And the tall boots come off a lot more easily after a ride than paddock boots and half chaps would. I do wear tank tops to ride outside in the summer...I'm 49, somewhat well-endowed and need to wear a REAL bra, so the tank tops are conservatively cut and not revealing (no spaghetti straps!). I frequently wear sleeveless dresses to work in the summer, I can't really deal with a farmer's tan! Clinics, however, get the de rigeur polo shirt.

GingerJumper
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:24 PM
I tend to be a bit of a fashionista, riding clothing wise. I can't help it, fashion runs in the family, and I just enjoy carrying it over into my riding as well.

That said, I have been known to ride in shorts, bare feet, sports bras (just to show off my six pack, which is currently non existant. -_-) , spaghetti strap tanks... all sorts of things, and often helmetless.

Personally, I don't care what others wear at home schooling, but if they're showing I find it a little annoying to see a lack of neatness and cleanliness. I don't care if you're wearing the old cut Tailords or if the zip is in the front or the back, but at least wear clean ones and tuck in your shirt with a belt. And for crying out loud, make sure the horse and tack are clean!

My biggest pet peeve is filthy boots though... I don't care about at home, but at least give them a quick wipe-off at a show. Good grief.

TrakHack
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:24 PM
When I sail with my brother I get a talking to if I have the wrong footwear..not because of how it looks but because I might slip or *gasp* scuff up the boat:lol:

I got the same speech from my mother, but the focus was solely on scuffing the boat. :D

Like it or not, how you present yourself does affect how people perceive you.

hntrjmprpro45
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:39 PM
I don't care if it is 100+ and HUMID (not unheard during July in Georgia), I would never wear a tank top/baggy t-shirt/shorts and half chaps/etc. I wear a polo, breeches, and tall boots every.single.ride. Looking sloppy won't stop me from sweating.

Whether I am in the ring or hacking around the property there is always a chance that I will be seen by a passing car, neighbor, or a potential new barn member. In my opinion it would be selfish (not to mention tasteless) for me to strut around in a tank top to stay "cooler" while representing my barn.

So for me it is a total no brainer. It is as easy as a polo and light-weight breeches in the summer and a polo, sweater, and heavy full-seat breeches in the winter. My "uniform" keeps me comfortable in everything from 25-100 degrees and all my polos are inexpensive new shirts from Target or used Ralph Lauren, Polo brand, Lacoste, etc (all of which I picked up for < $15 a piece). I also put my hair up in a hair net, use conservative colored saddle pads, and groom my mare to the 9s. This is my passion and I take my appearance seriously.


For example: The picture below is from a clinic I organized and I had < 10 min to get ready once I was done helping everyone get settled and paperwork filled out
http://i1222.photobucket.com/albums/dd486/GraceLikeRain1990/IMG_3442.jpg
Sure I could have tossed on a tank top and pink saddle pad but IMHO this looks so much better

THIS! Personally as a trainer, I always wear a fitted polo, breeches, tall boots, and my hair up under my helmet (though not necessarily using a hairnet) every single day even when it gets to be 95+.

And I LOVE it when my riders where polos, breeches and tall boots- it not only makes you look nicer when you ride (shows off the rider's silhouette better), but also adds a look of professionalism. It says to people "I take this seriously" even if they aren't lessoning. Is there anything wrong with scrubby, tshirts, jeans and half chaps? No, but it leaves an impression that you are either a beginner or just not a serious rider.

With that being said, we do not have a strict dress code at our barn at all. All of our beginner riders just go in what is comfortable and what they can afford. However, all of my more serious riders wear fitted shirts, breeches, tall boots, and hair up underneath their helmets without me every having to say ANYTHING at all. They just imitate what our other serious riders are doing and voila!

wildlifer
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:48 PM
Like it or not, how you present yourself does affect how people perceive you.

And the point is, we DON'T CARE. If someone doesn't like me because of what I wear when I ride, I'm pretty sure we are not going to be friends anyway. :lol: I am secure enough to be fine with that.

quietann
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:52 PM
So wait, what's so bad about tank tops anyway? People are acting like they're this horrible fashion faux pas but they're pretty standard attire for women during the summer in my part of the world. Of course I am out west in a pretty casual area (you can tell people are dressed up because they break out the white straw cowboy hats :lol:) but I had no idea I was so trashy because I rarely wear shirts with sleeves or collars during the summer. :winkgrin:


No problem with tank tops here, as long as they are not low cut. Spaghetti-strap tops are another matter... I've seen the straps fail at inopportune moments, and if your chest isn't tiny, it's a bit too much exposure. So basically, sleeveless is fine as long as there's no cleavage showing (this is the rule at my work BTW). I sometimes wear sleevless polos to ride, or higher-necked tank tops.

BTW one correction to my previous post... for a lesson, I almost always wear a polo rather than a T-shirt. I still won't tuck it in, though. I know someone who got her Silver medal and -- gasp!!! -- she never tucked her shirt in while showing. I also wear crochet gloves in the summer and even have a black pair for showing, though showing isn't happening this year, probably.

Janet
Jun. 20, 2011, 04:53 PM
. Is there anything wrong with scrubby, tshirts, jeans and half chaps? No, but it leaves an impression that you are either a beginner or just not a serious rider.
How can you "leave an impression" when nobody is watching?

I fully agree with dressing neatly when you appear in public. But the article was berating people who dress in non-neat clothes "while schooling your horses, at home" where there is nobody to "leave an impression" on.

You are not going to see me in a tank top or a sports bra or jeans, but it is because I find them uncomfortable. I wear britches or riding tights, with "riding sneakers" for everyday, and tall boots for lessons. And I wear a clean neat polo for lessons. But I see no reason to discard my slightly worn, slightly faded, maybe grass stained, polos and teeshirts for schooling my horses, at home.

hntrjmprpro45
Jun. 20, 2011, 05:00 PM
How can you "leave an impression" when nobody is watching?

I fully agree with dressing neatly when you appear in public. But the article was berating people who dress in non-neat clothes "while schooling your horses, at home" where there is nobody to "leave an impression" on.

I took "schooling at home" to just mean that they weren't lessoning... not that they were in their own backyard (seeing as the majority of riders board their horses at someone else's facilities).

And I will add that typically if you don't take yourself seriously then no one else will... not that you HAVE to dress neatly to take yourself seriously but it is a step in the right direction- just like always cleaning your tack and properly grooming your horse.

Janet
Jun. 20, 2011, 05:05 PM
The picture below is from a clinic I organized and I had < 10 min to get ready once I was done helping everyone get settled and paperwork filled out
That was a clinic, where I completely agree that you should dress neatly.

NOT
"while schooling your horses, at home"
which is the point of contention.

enjoytheride
Jun. 20, 2011, 05:06 PM
Or, get this, you could actually watch me ride before you decided to judge me.

I dress very nice when I'm at work or out on a day off, but if I'm mucking stalls and it's 90 degrees I'll be wearing a tank top and shorts. I'll usually put breeches on to ride, but lately I've been wearing a pair of tights with sticky purple pegasus on the butt.

Why yes, I have worn shorts. I am at a small private barn, at most I'll see someone else twice a week.

If I go to a clinic or a lesson I'll wear a polo, put my hair up, polish and wear my boots, and wear a nice pair of breeches. At home? Who cares.

vineyridge
Jun. 20, 2011, 05:23 PM
Only ten years ago, it was still possible to get breeches that were loose fitting and woven. I know because I have several pairs. One is even flared and 100% cotton. I would NEVER ride in anything but breeches and tall boots, but that's because that's how I was raised. I admit that leather around the legs is HOT, but the grip that you get from it is worth sweaty legs. The colors that I wear for riding are the same ones that were appropriate when I was growing up. Even so, when you're talking about heat indexes that are well over 100, light colors and being covered from head to toe keep one healthy. I'm remembering what the folks who chopped cotton used to wear in the fields, and scanty clothes and knits were NOT the attire of choice.

I'm sure that in other climates other riding attire is both comfortable and appropriate.

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 05:26 PM
If someone is schooling a horse well at say, 4th or PSG (let alone GP) in the ring and is wearing flip flops I might question not their taste, but their sanity. If that same person was wearing safe shoes and a pair of jeans and cowboy boots, I would think they were a darn good rider (as long as the horse is going well). I really could care less. I think it's really sad that the horse world tends to judge people on what they wear more than what they do.

You can bet that at many barns, a fashionista with WAY too much money would show up in the ring and more people would watch her ride and lust after her wardrobe. The smart ones would watch the cowgirl and lust after her ability to ride and train. Too bad there are so few smart ones who can see past the clothes and recognize true talent. :no:

As for riding in clinics, shows, etc. that's totally different than schooling at home on a truly blistering day. And maybe those who hate tank tops don't like them because they show too much cleavage. Some people don't have that problem. :lol: (Oh, and polos can help hide slips in posture--at fitted tank top NEVER will, so for some people that actually might be MORE appropriate to wear in a lesson than a polo.)

If we're talking normal temps, etc., a non-hacking day on trails, etc., then I'm all for boots and breeches.

When I think back to the old tube top days. :lol: :lol: I saw some pretty funny accidents in my youth with some well endowed riders! :lol: :lol:

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 05:27 PM
Enjoytheride, I just saw your sig. Can I have my change back now? :lol:

TrakHack
Jun. 20, 2011, 06:02 PM
I think it's really sad that the horse world tends to judge people on what they wear more than what they do.


This isn't just the horse world.

I understand a lot of people don't care how they are perceived. That's great, if it works for you. In my professional experience, perceptions are important. I promoted eight people within a department of about 65 employees in the past year, and how they are perceived by their peers and clients absolutely factored into the decision to promote. Projecting a professional image is rarely going to hurt you in life (that image goes well beyond attire, though).

Note, nowhere have I talked about being trendy or stylish; I'm probably the antithesis of that, and my style could better be described as boring (if you don't like it) or classic (if you do).

Beam Me Up
Jun. 20, 2011, 06:22 PM
I wish someone would pay me to write two pages of drivel.


Seriously!

The safety stuff is a fine reminder (helmets, boots, covered legs = good) but the rest came off pretty juvenile. Barns, trainers, etc. may have standards and dress codes that need to be followed, but the opinion of that author matters to whom?

TickleFight
Jun. 20, 2011, 06:27 PM
This isn't just the horse world.

I understand a lot of people don't care how they are perceived. That's great, if it works for you. In my professional experience, perceptions are important. I promoted eight people within a department of about 65 employees in the past year, and how they are perceived by their peers and clients absolutely factored into the decision to promote. Projecting a professional image is rarely going to hurt you in life (that image goes well beyond attire, though).

Note, nowhere have I talked about being trendy or stylish; I'm probably the antithesis of that, and my style could better be described as boring (if you don't like it) or classic (if you do).

But for most of us riding isn't work... it's a hobby, so unless one is a professional rider/instructor the comparison just doesn't fit. If riding ever became anything like a job I would quit; I work enough as it is.

Appearances carry weight while showing or maybe taking lessons, however, most riding falls outside of these parameters. And, frankly, if other people don't consider me a serious hobbyist because of what I'm wearing, then that's fine. After all, when it comes to horses the only opinion I care about is the one I'm paying for.

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 06:31 PM
Seriously!

The safety stuff is a fine reminder (helmets, boots, covered legs = good) but the rest came off pretty juvenile. Barns, trainers, etc. may have standards and dress codes that need to be followed, but the opinion of that author matters to whom?

I got the feeling the author is talking more to HJ riders. That was just my first guess. I think if you got eventers involved in tjis discussion it would be even more entertaining. But they have better things to do--like ride their horses to keep them fit for the season.

Lost_at_C
Jun. 20, 2011, 07:36 PM
All these words like professional, serious, image, ... they kind of brings to mind that old saying: All the gear and no idear. If someone wants to dress snazzily that's cool, and I'm rarely without tall boots and breeches myself. But I never, EVER fool myself into thinking that what I'm wearing on any given day somehow makes me a better or worse rider than I am. Maybe that's why I'd rather put money into auditing a clinic than buying a joules polo.

Seriously, do you all have an array of polo shirts and light colored breeches that somehow repel horse dribble stains and saddle soap and never get holes in them? I genuinely want to know! How often is your wardrobe "replenished"? I guess I'm one of those people who buys umpteen blankets and bits for my horse but rarely indulges my own sartorial yearnings!

carolprudm
Jun. 20, 2011, 07:52 PM
All these words like professional, serious, image, ... they kind of brings to mind that old saying: All the gear and no idear. If someone wants to dress snazzily that's cool, and I'm rarely without tall boots and breeches myself. But I never, EVER fool myself into thinking that what I'm wearing on any given day somehow makes me a better or worse rider than I am. Maybe that's why I'd rather put money into auditing a clinic than buying a joules polo.

Seriously, do you all have an array of polo shirts and light colored breeches that somehow repel horse dribble stains and saddle soap and never get holes in them? I genuinely want to know! How often is your wardrobe "replenished"? I guess I'm one of those people who buys umpteen blankets and bits for my horse but rarely indulges my own sartorial yearnings!

YUP

Fourbeats
Jun. 20, 2011, 08:44 PM
Tank tops, light weight riding tights and half chaps at home. Sometimes I will wear a comfortable t-shirt but in our Texas heat I prefer tank tops. I wear the ones that offer plenty of chest coverage so no worries about too much of the girls showing and no worries about farmer's tan.

Lessons do get a nice polo but not tucked in, I don't like the tucked in look unless one has a very flat stomach, which I don't. As long as me and my horses are neat and clean I'm happy. Otherwise, I couldn't care less what others think about the way I look.

eponacelt
Jun. 20, 2011, 09:04 PM
But for most of us riding isn't work... it's a hobby, so unless one is a professional rider/instructor the comparison just doesn't fit. If riding ever became anything like a job I would quit; I work enough as it is.

Appearances carry weight while showing or maybe taking lessons, however, most riding falls outside of these parameters. And, frankly, if other people don't consider me a serious hobbyist because of what I'm wearing, then that's fine. After all, when it comes to horses the only opinion I care about is the one I'm paying for.

While this is absolutely true - I'm an ammy, not a pro - I can't tell you how many times I've run into people I either work with or whose opinions matter to me in the community, while I was at the barn. How many people here board? In their, or near their, own community? Well, when you build relationships with people at the barn, that can translate into other relationships that have nothing to do with horses. The potential boarder who stopped by the other day, but didn't talk to you in particular, could be the town councilman in the town where you want them to allow construction of riding trails. Or the boarder down the aisle that you don't really know could be someone who works for the place where you just had a job interview.

People judge. Its part of the world we live in. Projecting a neat and tidy appearance never hurts. And as I said in a prior post, all the external drivers aside, putting yourself together can have a positive impact on your mental state all on its own.

If this doesn't work for you, then fine! But please don't try to say that its looks don't matter. They do, and often when you don't want them to! :D

TrakHack
Jun. 20, 2011, 09:29 PM
I'm a hobby rider but I still like looking well put together. I'm also the person who spends more time grooming than I do riding. My goal is to have fun with my horse, and fun for me includes all aspects of horsemanship (I love cleaning tack, too). This isn't specific to horses; when I go to the gun range I wear "nice" clothes, too, and I like cleaning my guns.

In the last three months my horse has gotten a stable sheet, fly sheet, a new (used) saddle, a grooming halter, and a plain D ring snaffle (he's going to do some hunter classes and yes, I do want him to look the part). I think the only item of apparel I got for myself was a belt on clearance from Smartpak... I haven't bought new breeches in years, but I also still have clothes from high school, too. My horse slimes me on a regular basis, but I've had good luck with all temperature Cheer.

Some people probably do scoff at me and the perception I give off with "all my gear". I'm okay with that because I realize that is the image I'm projecting. With that being said, once I find something I like I don't buy things unnecessarily; I've been using the same old Farrier's Formula bucket for over ten years as a grooming bucket. :)

TrakHack
Jun. 20, 2011, 09:32 PM
What eponacelt said!

Janet
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:02 PM
And as I said in a prior post, all the external drivers aside, putting yourself together can have a positive impact on your mental state all on its own.

If this doesn't work for you, then fine! And vice versa. If dressing up to ride makes YOU have a more positive mental state, then go for it.

But please don't try to impose it on those of us for whom it has no such effect.

rebecca yount
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:18 PM
I HAVE to wear low-rise breeches or tights rolled down--otherwise my belly button piercing gets irritated. And that way my tramp stamp shows, too...

GraceLikeRain
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:21 PM
That was a clinic, where I completely agree that you should dress neatly.

NOT
"while schooling your horses, at home"
which is the point of contention.

The point of my post was that this picture reflects how I dress every single time I go to the barn.


Today I went to the barn, mucked 8 stalls, fed, prepped feed, dumped water buckets, swept, etc. I then changed into a polo, breeches, tall boots, put my hair up, and popped on gloves to hack my mare for 20 min at a walk around the property. According to a lot of people on this forum, dressing this way makes me self-absorbed or somehow a lesser horsewoman.


However, my barn is literally located behind the owners house so it is pretty common for me to run into a family member or a guest stopping by their home. This evening I crossed the driveway just as a guest pulled in. I doubt the driver noticed what I was wearing and that's the way I like it. I want a passerby to think "Oh look, a horse, well that's neat" than to think "wow her shorts are riding up her rear end and I can see her midriff."

TickleFight
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:39 PM
While this is absolutely true - I'm an ammy, not a pro - I can't tell you how many times I've run into people I either work with or whose opinions matter to me in the community, while I was at the barn. How many people here board? In their, or near their, own community? Well, when you build relationships with people at the barn, that can translate into other relationships that have nothing to do with horses. The potential boarder who stopped by the other day, but didn't talk to you in particular, could be the town councilman in the town where you want them to allow construction of riding trails. Or the boarder down the aisle that you don't really know could be someone who works for the place where you just had a job interview.

People judge. Its part of the world we live in. Projecting a neat and tidy appearance never hurts. And as I said in a prior post, all the external drivers aside, putting yourself together can have a positive impact on your mental state all on its own.

If this doesn't work for you, then fine! But please don't try to say that its looks don't matter. They do, and often when you don't want them to! :D

There is a negative side to living one's life as if in a perpetual job interview or elite club initiation as well.

Most people seem to choose the "off switch" while at the stable. Riding my horse is "me time," not networking time, and so far I have yet to meet anybody in my social or professional life who is crazy enough to ride dressage, let alone judge me on my appearance while doing it.

The day that hot, straight, single men start riding dressage in large numbers will be the day that I put more thought into my everyday riding attire.

KrazyTBMare
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:42 PM
I think the big differences of opinions are also coming from those of us who keep our horses at home, not in a neighborhood, where you dont really encounter neighbors or other people vs those who board at a facility or even keep their horses at home but have lots of neighbors and they arent secluded.

I keep my horses at home. I live on a street with 11 other houses. I personally wont ride in spaghetti straps or just a sports bra as I have no business doing so! LOL Plus I need the heavy duty ugly but effective sports bras to hold the girls up and in. Do I wear tank tops? Yup. Have I ridden in shorts? Yup. But now a days, I just wear my tuff rider knee patch tights as they are thin and cool, a sports bra, and usually a tank top of some sort. None of my shirts are holy or low cut, etc. Obviously if I am riding in a lesson or clinic, a polo - either sleeve or sleeveless, with breeches and I wear my half chaps as they are nice enough to look like tall boots.

Now if I know I am going to the barn for the sole purpose of beauty day for the ponys, then Ill wear shorts and usually my sperrys or ariat terrians and whatever shirt I grab (I have barn clothes and non barn clothes). I used to wear bigger t shirts and jeans and all that but personally I find it easier to ride in properly fitting shirts (esp when they are too long and they get under your butt while you are posting and then it starts to choke you!) and breeches, esp when my saddles cost more than my first horse, I dont want the seams on the jeans rubbing my saddles.

I dont think anyone wants to see anyone elses butt crack - on a horse or not. If someone wants to ride in shorts, well have at it. I can totally understand those who do not agree though esp if you again ride at a facility. Its like walking into Ruths Chris in cut off jeans or holy jeans, a baggy tshirt, and tennis shoes. You just dont.

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2011, 10:58 PM
There is a negative side to living one's life as if in a perpetual job interview or elite club initiation as well.

Most people seem to choose the "off switch" while at the stable. Riding my horse is "me time," not networking time, and so far I have yet to meet anybody in my social or professional life who is crazy enough to ride dressage, let alone judge me on my appearance while doing it.

The day that hot, straight, single men start riding dressage in large numbers will be the day that I put more thought into my everyday riding attire.

^Well said!!!! :lol:

katie+tru
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:16 PM
Not only does one's riding apparel depend on where they are riding, but what else they do while at the barn. I don't know about you guys but I typically do atleast 2 hours of stall cleaning and other barn work before even tacking up a horse (not to mention working afterwards). I get dirty. Fact of life for me. I try to not knowingly stain myself but it's rather inevitable. I'm sure I'd stay a lot cleaner and could justifiably purchase and wear nice outfits if I was just driving to barn, getting a horse out, tacking it up, riding, and then leaving. But that's not what I do so I have never enjoyed the luxury of matching outfits, technical shirts, or pricey schooling breeches.

My current riding wardrobe is a wifebeater tank or older t-shirt and then either jeans or well worn, $35 schooling tights with half chaps. I should probably get in the habit of packing of extra set of clothes in my car... a clean shirt may feel nice... but sometimes it's just too hot and muggy or I'm feeling just a bit too lazy to change clothes. I figure, why mess around changing clothes when I can easily ride in jeans?

My trainer does not care for spaghetti straps and has a real distain for sports bras. Those are the only "restrictions" in my barn.

dghunter
Jun. 20, 2011, 11:27 PM
I usually wear jeans, half chaps, paddock boots, and a t-shirt or tank top. Sometimes breeches and paddock boots/half chaps and t-shirt or tank top. If I had my own place and was about 30lbs thinner, I would definitely be riding in my sports bra! If I have to do other barn work I always ride first then change into shorts. My shirts and jeans happen to be whatever is pulled out of the closet in the morning.

Lateralwork
Jun. 21, 2011, 12:02 AM
I completely agree with the article.

I have never in my life worn a spaghetti strap tank or shorts on a horse and I haven't gotten heat stroke yet.

Meanwhile, a neatly fitting, $10 solid color polo shirt from Target is really not any warmer OR more expensive than a sloppy t-shirt with a logo or howling wolf on it. T-shirts without logos are not warmer than t-shirts with logos. Clothes that fit aren't warmer than clothes that don't.

Every time I go to Target/Walmart/Kohl's and stand in front of piles and piles of $10 shirts, half of which are on sale for $3, I really wonder about why people think it is "too expensive" to dress neatly.

And I have lived and ridden in TX and FL, which I believe get hot enough to count.

Oh, lighten up! Have some fun once in a while. It's horseback riding, not a Nordstorm fashion show.

Janet
Jun. 21, 2011, 12:02 AM
Today I went to the barn, mucked 8 stalls, fed, prepped feed, dumped water buckets, swept, etc. I then changed into a polo, breeches, tall boots, put my hair up, and popped on gloves to hack my mare for 20 min at a walk around the property. According to a lot of people on this forum, dressing this way makes me self-absorbed or somehow a lesser horsewoman.
_I_ am certainly not calling anyone "self-absorbed" or a "lesser horseman" for dressing up to ride.

But don't call ME "not serious about my riding" because I choose not to.

Covergirl15
Jun. 21, 2011, 12:50 AM
Although I personally always wear breeches, paddock boots and half chaps, a polo, and my hair up in a hair net, it is honestly because that is what I am more comfortable in. When I sweat, I tend to get itchy and so the times I would wear shorts, I would scratch the whole time from the sweat and bugs that liked to land on my legs. But I could care less what you are wearing, as long as I don't have to see too much ;), whatever is comfortable is fine with me. (I do ride at a fairly relaxed barn, though before I rode at a barn where you would get looked down at if you didn't wear breeches, tall boots, helmet & hairnet, with polo tucked in, and a belt. I usually wear it anyway (minus the shirt tucked in and the belt), but it made me nervous to know that everyone judged you on what you wore there(or so it seemed).

WILLOW&CAL
Jun. 21, 2011, 03:18 AM
I don't think the article was encouraging dressing for success here or dropping big brand names to be 'seen in'...Im not sure what the dress has to do with ability of the rider and comparing a barn-fashionista's riding with that of some cowgirl has ANYTHING to do with it. Its less about perception and surface appearance but more 'fashion' serving a function. To me it was about functional and neat vs inapropriate attire for riding.
People who are getting deliciously preachy about how the rider's skill is somehow not paid attention to when his clothes are being 'judged' are missing the point.

meupatdoes
Jun. 21, 2011, 03:25 AM
Oh, lighten up! Have some fun once in a while. It's horseback riding, not a Nordstorm fashion show.

Ahaha, you better watch out for snotty ol' me and my $3 shirts.

:lol::lol::lol:

WILLOW&CAL
Jun. 21, 2011, 03:36 AM
For got to add...this article was written for people like one of my barn mates who arrived at the barn last week in a strappy top, skinny jeans and a piece of costume jewellery around her neck that would blind a person from 2kms away. When I asked her about her hat (first time riding her TB in 6 months post injury :0), she said she forgot it at home. So you remember THAT necklace which could garrot you if you fell, but you forgot your hat? Some people just need to be guided towards sanity.

eponacelt
Jun. 21, 2011, 06:35 AM
There is a negative side to living one's life as if in a perpetual job interview or elite club initiation as well.



True. There is. But that doesn't mean that people aren't judging you in ways you don't realize and that could help or harm you in unknown ways down the road.

I don't live in an "elite" town. While I'm only about 30 miles from Middleburg, my town is typical redneck Virginia, so I'm not sure where the "elite club initiation" remark came from.

As I said in my original post, if dressing without care works for you, then great. Carry on.

Velvet
Jun. 21, 2011, 09:44 AM
True. There is. But that doesn't mean that people aren't judging you in ways you don't realize and that could help or harm you in unknown ways down the road.

I don't live in an "elite" town. While I'm only about 30 miles from Middleburg, my town is typical redneck Virginia, so I'm not sure where the "elite club initiation" remark came from.

As I said in my original post, if dressing without care works for you, then great. Carry on.

Ah, now it makes sense. In the south, it's all about who you know, not what you know. In the north, Yankees are a bit different. We separate business and personal life/sports. We might judge someone in business, at first glance, but will also judge them and promote them on what they DO on the job since we want the hard workers getting promoted. In the horse world, if you're a pro, you dress it when teaching and training at your barn or a client's. When at home in your own barn--away from clients, no one cares.

If you are just enjoying your own horse at the barn/boarding stable, NO ONE CARES. If they do, most of those are people who think you can buy the clothes and become a better rider. The "all hat no cow" type people. If you're trying TOO hard to impress, you DEFINITELY fall into that category and everyone will be watching you more carefully and will be more critical when it turns out you can't ride well. :yes:

In the south, people also judge you by who you know, who your relatives are and how long you've lived somewhere. You could be the biggest hack rider around, but if you know the right people--you must be great! Yeah, like it really works that way. :rolleyes: Dressage by osmosis. :lol:

cnm161
Jun. 21, 2011, 09:52 AM
So. When I read the article, it sounded like the audience was to be young(ish) new professionals/working students. Not amateurs riding at their own facility. And in that light it definitely makes sense: look professional when you ride in order to be taken more seriously as a professional.

As far as North vs South... not so sure that's the case, seeing as I just visited several barns in the Pittsburgh area where clearly appearance mattered. And I've sampled the other side (Houston area) as well and noted something similar. It's looking like the location's relation to the Mason-Dixon doesn't make that much of a difference in pretension.

wildlifer
Jun. 21, 2011, 10:11 AM
Uh, I live in the south and...no. No one gives a flip who I'm related to or who I know.

catosis
Jun. 21, 2011, 11:08 AM
Peace out. This has gotten a little too serious for my liking. I doubt that anyone was actually trying to make digs at anyone else. Ultimately, everyone is going to do what they will in terms of dress, so in the words of Cicero, "iustitia est unicuique suum tribuendi". Justice is the giving of to each his own.

If there is anything we can conclude from this, it is that what you wear does not make you a better or worse rider/horse(wo)man.

mp
Jun. 21, 2011, 11:10 AM
Ah, now it makes sense. In the south, it's all about who you know, not what you know. In the north, Yankees are a bit different. We separate business and personal life/sports. We might judge someone in business, at first glance, but will also judge them and promote them on what they DO on the job since we want the hard workers getting promoted.

blah blah blah blah ....

In the south, people also judge you by who you know, who your relatives are and how long you've lived somewhere. You could be the biggest hack rider around, but if you know the right people--you must be great! Yeah, like it really works that way. Dressage by osmosis.


Oh, quit trying to stir up more poo today, would ya?

What's that biblical verse about the moat and the beam? :lol:




As I said in my original post, if dressing without care works for you, then great. Carry on.

Yup. It's about what works for each individual.

I dress with care when "in public" at the barn AND when I'm riding at home. I like wearing clothes that are clean, comfortable for riding and appropriate for my aging bod. I even dig through my ball caps to find one that goes (or at least doesn't clash) with whatever I'm wearing.

It has zero to do with respect for the barn/horse/sport/whatever. It has to do with respect for myself. I'm not a nut about it. I just feel better when I look nice.

netg
Jun. 21, 2011, 11:19 AM
It has zero to do with respect for the barn/horse/sport/whatever. It has to do with respect for myself. I'm not a nut about it. I just feel better when I look nice.

I'm guessing this is what it comes down to for most people.

I never heard the "it shows respect for the sport" line - I'm pretty sure there is no personification of dressage out there. Now, if I were going to clinic with a BNT I would dress nicely. I dress so my instructor can see what I am doing wtih my body, so more fitted shirts when riding with her, and I ride dress safety. Here, that means adjusting appropriately for the heat, whether in a tank top or shirt which fits closely but not tightly, so it doesn't affect breathing but isn't a threat to catch.

If I were at a boarding facility with an image including dressing up more, well, I'd probably move my horses - but otherwise I'd try to make sure I dressed appropriately for the chosen image the barn projects. This being a very casual town, I haven't really seen many people dressing up except at shows. One of my friends does - and she goes with fun colors, etc., too. I absolutely LOVE how she dresses! I have neither the time or budget she does, but admire her sense of style and tell her so regularly.

I'm just an unprofessional bum myself, though, when it comes to the barn. That's what works for me.

chancellor2
Jun. 21, 2011, 11:36 AM
Yeah, but then that's NO TAN. And some of us still like a bit of color in the summer. You can not like it, that's your perogative, but don't judge everyone by your own standards of whiteness. :D


My first career and fall back career is all about skin cancer. Thanks for being so willing to support it.

Velvet
Jun. 21, 2011, 11:45 AM
My first career and fall back career is all about skin cancer. Thanks for being so willing to support it.

:lol: :lol:

katie+tru
Jun. 21, 2011, 03:14 PM
I'll just say this. Having grown up in a barn where no one is dressing in matching outfits and wearing polos and high boots for lessons, but were all classically taught, and can kick some major bootie at shows, I look completely past people's wardrobe when I watch them ride. Or atleast I try to. In my personal experience and observations over the years it has often seemed like many of the people who came to clinics and informal shows dressed up and flaunting name brands were often the least talented riders. At this point in my life when I see people walking around in their Joules polos and $500 helmets and name brand breeches I just think "Gee, I hope you ride just as well as you dress, because if not you sure are drawing a lot of attention to yourself".

Wearing half chaps and jeans does not mean I'm not serious or passionate about my riding. It just means I'm too broke to buy nicer stuff and that I don't see the point in dressing up just to get dirty. I know how to dress nice when I legitimately have to and that's what matters.

PFMJ
Jun. 21, 2011, 03:39 PM
Interesting thread. For me, regardless of the weather there are certain things I like to wear for turnout.

I have some lovely microfibre breeches that are super lightweight, full seat and allow me to maintain my position day after day. I've also been fortunate enough to find a nice collection of sales polos from outlet stores (love J Crew, although I have some nice Target ones too). Mostly, I wear long sleeve t-shirts made especially for hot weather for sun protection.

I find that riding and being turned out well, allows me to maintain consistancy--my tall boots vs. chaps/paddocks, as the feel is very different. Further, this turnout makes me feel good. BUT, I don't think I really notice one way or another how someone else is turned out. Really, to each, their own. It is what I am comfortable in wearing, and I guess the same for others.

lorilu
Jun. 21, 2011, 04:15 PM
As I said in my original post, if dressing without care works for you, then great. Carry on.

Without Care? Not a bit. I carefully pick out my thin tank top and colorful sports bra (my girls don't need much :D), with an eye to the 98 degree forecast and 105 degree "feels like" prediction. Breeches (kerritts microcord) and tall boots and helmet. No neeed for hair to go up, since I have it cut VERY short JUST so it is good under my helmet.

Today instead of the tank top it's a strappy workout top, microfiber, with a shelf bra. I did not die when I rode my lesson at 11 or so. My trainer is OK with it .

Granted, when I take a lesson with another trainer, I do wear sleeveless polo type tops, mostly golfing shirts. MUST be NOT cotton, but some other coolmax type material.

Without care? NOT A Bit.

Loretta in HOT Ocala.
Too far from the coast for a cool breeze - it's a warm wind by the time it gets to us. PLEASE send some rain!

Gloria
Jun. 21, 2011, 04:30 PM
Unless you are a skinny teenager with A- chest, oh please, dear god, do not show up in public with that sport bra... All those rolls of flesh half baked in sizzling sun to resemble halfway seasoned bacon flapping around your bras, your belly, and what not, is not a testimony of your intelligence, nor your sense.

Private in your own back yard? Who care?

Now, if you boast the gorgeous body of Jane Fonda on Golden Pond, I envy you, and more power to you, but, even Jane won't look too hot if her boobs were slapping up and down on a horse (hence don't even go there unless you are endowed with an A- chest). :eek:

belgianWBLuver
Jun. 21, 2011, 05:50 PM
I wish someone would pay me to write two pages of drivel.
I do have to wonder though, how do you all wear shorts and half chaps without getting rubs and a heat rash?
Oh, and I don't give a crap if my farmer's tan is ugly! I earned every line and freckle.

:lol::lol::lol:

Molly Micvee
Jun. 21, 2011, 07:44 PM
I really find that I have to wear my riding boots. I cant ride in jeans and paddock boots, not if I want to seriously accomplish anything on my horse. The jeans ride up and rub.:no: There is no way in God's earth that I will wear actual jodfers in 990 degree weather. That's how hot it is here.;)
I never get hot in my boots. ever, Ive found that lose fitting around the thiegh cotten tights are the coolest.

The only problem they are black. I would like to know, why hasnt a riding company invented a pair of jodfers yet that are made of light breathing material that stay cool and keep their jodfer shape at the same time. I have seen some breathing type pants before but they were "still" made with rather heavy woven material.

On my top I wear a cut off t-shirt that I have made a design on with fabiric crayons. I have a dragon horse on my back. I wear the same shirt over and over again and I very seldom wash it. lolloll this is true. Does it matter, I ride alone only my horse sees me. It has the words Agape written on the back.
Also, when its really hot I take a bandana, no not a banana and wrap ice in it and tie around my neck. This really works well. I was wondering, is there any kind of neck thing like this on the market? I know there are cooling vests of a certain type, right? something sewn with a pocket for the ice or a dry ice pack would be cool. If this has/nt been invented yet, I have rights to it. :D

Molly Micvee
Jun. 21, 2011, 07:46 PM
P.S. I forgot, Ive a solution for the black cotten tights, beach!!!!! Then they will be grey which will be much better, more sun friendly. :)

carolprudm
Jun. 21, 2011, 07:53 PM
P.S. I forgot, Ive a solution for the black cotten tights, beach!!!!! Then they will be grey which will be much better, more sun friendly. :)

Equissentials.net equicool

Mukluk
Jun. 22, 2011, 12:00 AM
TRUCE!!!!! How about you wear what makes you happy? The nifty spiffy folks get all nifty and spiffy.... whilst the casual, perhaps a bit slobbish folks do their thing. Count me in the second group. I'm happy and my horse could care less!!!

luchiamae
Jun. 22, 2011, 06:50 AM
I haven't read all the posts but I think I am the odd one out... I always make an effort to look smart.

Dressage.For.Life.
Jun. 22, 2011, 08:18 AM
I had to chuckle a bit at some of these posts.

I live in Indiana and bad summers include temperatures that are all through the 90s, with the temps sometimes hitting above 99 or 100 degrees. Oh, and it's never a dry heat here, either.

I'm not a "dressage queen" or anything but I do care about looking tidy. And, tidy for me is wearing clothes that fit, a top that has some type of sleeves, and breeches that allow my instructor to see my leg (whether I'm in a lesson or not I do not care for really dark breeches).

Even in the summer I (who is really quite sensitive to the heat and tends to not hand it well) will wear a cami over a sports bra and under a t-shirt. On bottom I wear a pair of regular Irideon cadence breeches. I clean stalls wearing that type of setup and I live. Sure, it's warm at first, although anything is going to be in this heat, and then once I work up a good sweat I am fine.

Currently, I'm wearing my tall boots during all of my rides (long story) and I don't find them too miserable either. I put them on before I put on my horse's bridle (they actually feel nice and cool when first putting them on!) and take them off after I've unsaddled my horse. Then, when I'm hosing or sponging my horse off I tend to spray off my legs, which really helps me a lot. And, even in this humid heat, my breeches are as dry as they were prior to hosing my legs off by the time I finish at the barn.

When I had Ariat Terrian half chaps that fit me, I wore them, and they were great for this (spraying your legs off) and drying very quickly.

carolprudm
Jun. 22, 2011, 09:02 AM
FWIW, even when I make an effort to dress with reasonable care, in this heat I'm going to look like a sopping wet mess in very short order.

I sweat. As in" like a horse" (IIRC pigs don't sweat but I may be wrong on that point).

The saddle fitter was due around 4 yesterday so around 3:30 I put Sophie's tack outside (normally it's kept in the house) , changed into my best summer breeches...gotta admit the tee was grungy ...and paddock boots and went to get Sophie. She was standing maybe 20 yards from the back door.

But wait...there's a doe with a newborn kid a further 50 yards down the hill. Does do not know that kids cannot regulate their body temperature and while they are basking in the sun their kids are frying. By the time I had dragged Sophie down the hill "But mom the gate is THAT way" picked up the kid and walked back up to the house I was dripping andd wiping the sweat off my face with the hem of the tee.

And I hadn't groomed Sophie or tacked up, much less rode.

Forte
Jun. 22, 2011, 10:57 AM
I agree with the article completely. I wear breeches every day. Usually with a fitted (but not tight) polo short or some sort of sporty top in a technical/breathable material. Sleeveless is ok, but certainly not a strappy tanktop. These sorts of tops can be found inexpensively when sports shops have sales, or often in the sportswear section of Winners. I usually wear tall boots, but if I'm feeling casual, I wear blundstones and halfchaps. I expect my students to be tidy and professional in their manner of dress as well. I don't care what other people do, but for me it is important to present myself in a tidy and professional manner when I'm on a horse. For me it's a total frame of mind. Even when schooling at home, alone with no one watching, if my horse and I are tidy in our turnout, it's puts me in the frame of mind to have a constructive, effective ride. To me, it shows respect for my horse, my sport and my trainer. I am also not a fan of brightly colored saddle pads and polos. I do have a few set of colored gear (usually brown, tan or some other neutral color). When i use them, I try to make sure they in tones that are complementary with the colors I am wearing. For lessons, white polos/boots and saddle pad only. None of these items need to be expensive. It doesn't cost any more money to buy a shirt in a solid, neutral color that fits than it does to buy an ill fitting, brightly patterned one. Totally agree with whoever said that those Joules shirts are obnoxious.

piaffeprincess98
Jun. 22, 2011, 11:20 AM
It's pretty much me and my mom who ride at home. I always wear breeches or I think I would get rubbed. I have summer-weight ones that work fine. I also always wear tall boots unless maybe I'm on a hack, then I'll put half chaps/paddock boots on. I feel like I just need the support of the tall boots to ride well, especially in my dressage saddle.

I don't often wear spaghetti tanks, but I bought a bunch of Under Armour/Nike/Target-brand sleeveless wicking shirts. I'll never go back to cotton again. It just feels so stuffy compared to Under Armour. Plus, the wicking shirts dry faster too. I usually wear darker colors for lessons so the sweat doesn't show through, and for clinics or schooling shows I'll always wear a polo. I've always worried if I fell of while jumping in a spaghetti tank top that I might get a bad case of sand/dirt burn on my arms!

I think the way I dress for riding was influenced by my dressage instructor. I just kind of copied her when I was younger, plus she taught me what was appropriate the first time I went to a clinic. It's been instilled in me and it just feels normal.

speculation07
Jun. 22, 2011, 12:20 PM
Am I the only one who finds a Polo to be the hottest of all of them. I am in South Florida and I like to be very neat and tidy all of the time but most of the time I school in breeches (kerrits microcord) and boots or half chaps and a lightweight fitted t-shirt from Old Navy they have some that are so light and breathable I love them! I also Have to wear a sports bra or two. When I lose some weight and can fit into my expensive breeches for winter I will probably start wearing them again.

However in my junior years I had to lesson in Tailored Sportsmans, boots, a polo and 2 sports bras and the occasional Ace Bandage to keep the twins in check I was stick thin with a large chest. So maybe I am rebelling now :)

I kind of liked those crazy colors anyone know where you can purchase them?

piaffeprincess98
Jun. 22, 2011, 12:24 PM
[QUOTE=speculation07;5677596]Am I the only one who finds a Polo to be the hottest of all of them. [QUOTE]

Have you tried a wicking polo? I know the horsey brands can be quite expensive, but I keep an eye on Tack of the Day and Dover and wait for sales.

quietann
Jun. 22, 2011, 01:49 PM
You also have my vote for the wicking polos.

YMMV, but I cannot imagine using white pads all the time. I prefer pads that hide the stains a bit better. My favorite is a fall leaf print that makes my palomino mare look even prettier :) I don't use polos or boots most of the time, because I don't like the extra heat they hold in on horse legs, but do have some royal blue Woof splint boots for occasions where they might be useful.

Molly Micvee
Jun. 22, 2011, 02:02 PM
Oh Hell, I just ride naked.:D

Vesper Sparrow
Jun. 22, 2011, 03:21 PM
I like polo shirts because I find the open collar more comfortable than a tee-shirt. I agree that the part synthetic ones are cooler. I buy mine from LLBean. The new ones get worn to clinics and lessons and the older, grottier ones on grottier occasions. The other seasons, I like long-sleeved Underarmour type shirts and a vest.

I find I ride better in breeches and boots, but to each his/her own. Plus I don't want to scratch my expensive and hard-earned saddle.

Funnily enough, at my very low-key eventing/foxhunting barn, pretty much everyone (except the beginners on lesson horses) wears breeches and more than half wear tall boots.

Another advantage of riding everyday in breeches and boots is that they don't seem particularly onerous on a hot summer show day.

Velvet
Jun. 22, 2011, 03:22 PM
Oh Hell, I just ride naked.:D

:eek: Do you have Lady Godiva hair? Or just go for the even tan/burn? :lol:

SmartAlex
Jun. 22, 2011, 04:06 PM
Another advantage of riding everyday in breeches and boots is that they don't seem particularly onerous on a hot summer show day.

This is why I started "dressing up" to ride. I hate getting to a show and putting on a foreign feeling outfit. I have enough to worry about. All I want to do is add a jacket and have everything else feel comfy and familiar.

coloredhorse
Jun. 22, 2011, 04:14 PM
Oh Hell, I just ride naked.:D

That's one way to avoid the dreaded farmer tan! :lol:

wcporter
Jun. 22, 2011, 05:10 PM
Oh Hell, I just ride naked.:D

Ouch :eek::lol:

Velvet
Jun. 22, 2011, 05:12 PM
New dressage class: Naked Dressage. It could either be a HUGE draw for people to come out and watch, or it could chase people away. :lol: :lol:

cloudyandcallie
Jun. 22, 2011, 05:17 PM
Unless you are a skinny teenager with A- chest, oh please, dear god, do not show up in public with that sport bra... All those rolls of flesh half baked in sizzling sun to resemble halfway seasoned bacon flapping around your bras, your belly, and what not, is not a testimony of your intelligence, nor your sense.

Private in your own back yard? Who care?

Now, if you boast the gorgeous body of Jane Fonda on Golden Pond, I envy you, and more power to you, but, even Jane won't look too hot if her boobs were slapping up and down on a horse (hence don't even go there unless you are endowed with an A- chest). :eek:

Jane's don't move. She got falsies when she was married to Tom Hayden.:lol:

MyssMyst
Jun. 22, 2011, 05:26 PM
New dressage class: Naked Dressage. It could either be a HUGE draw for people to come out and watch, or it could chase people away. :lol: :lol:

Well, it would stop people from complaining that dressage was boring, right?

danceronice
Jun. 22, 2011, 08:35 PM
Where is that video of the naked show jumper when you need it?

(I hate polos. Pretty much never wear them unless I'm going to work and can't find a clean top I like better. And I don't wear chaps or half-chaps with my jeans, just jeans. I never have a problem keeping my leg on, except sometimes in tall boots as they feel too thick. No, don't use full-seat breeches ever, either--they weren't 'in' when I was showing back in the middle ages so I don't own any.)

JSwan
Jun. 23, 2011, 11:12 AM
Wearing half chaps and jeans does not mean I'm not serious or passionate about my riding.

For lessons or clinics - I definitely dress appropriately. Clean tack, clean horse, clean me, shirt or polo, boots, britches, gloves, helmet, hairnet, etc.

For daily riding - I'm afraid I rarely ride in britches. I've got to fit daily riding in with the rest of the farm chores, which includes feeding lots of different animals, bushogging, cutting the lawn, scrubbing troughs, etc. And I'm just not fond of changing clothes several times a day... so jeans and half chaps it is. I can just whip off the half chaps, put my muck boots back on - and turn back into "farm girl".

wcporter
Jun. 23, 2011, 11:38 AM
I get the whole, want to look nice and dress professionally thing when taking lessons or schooling.

But when its hot and humid, I could ride in this (http://sweatshirtstation.com/popup_image/pID/223), and be a beet red, sweaty, pit stained mess. OR I could ride in this (http://www.roadrunnersports.com/rrs/product-detail/viewer-popup.jsp?id=RRL910) (with extra sun screen, of course!) and be a more comfortable and cool and less of a hot, sweaty, pit stained, miserable mess.

Now, which version of me do you think would look more pulled together and professional? ;)

red mares
Jun. 23, 2011, 11:46 AM
Wow a 7 page thread on barn clothing. This might beat the fat rider threads.

Best thing about driving a horse - Shorts!

Funny thing is I've spent most of my life around saddleseat people and until I found COTH, I didn't even know that there was a such thing as a barn or lesson dress code. T-shirts, tank, jods, jeans, pony-tails, whatever, nobody cares. I don't think I've ever actually seen anyone ride in a polo shirt. :eek:

fivesocks
Jun. 23, 2011, 06:42 PM
Am I the only one who rides in long sleeves even in the summer? I used to be a waitress where we were required to wear white boy's oxford shirts, so now I use them for riding and they are fabulous! Lightweight and loose fitting :)

I hate farmers tans, and it doesn't seem to matter how much SPF 9,000 I apply, I will have a farmers tan in just a few rides. I swear these oxford shirts are NOT bad at all, if anything it's nice to have protection from the hot shining sun on my arms, and I pop the collar to keep the sun off my neck :)

CosMonster
Jun. 23, 2011, 07:02 PM
I get tan with sunscreen, too. And I even follow the guidelines of slathering it on really heavily and really frequently, all that stuff, to the point that I've been teased about it. I was reading these posts by people who don't tan when they use sunscreen and I thought I had just somehow been failing at sunscreen my whole life which would have been really sad. I'm glad you have the same trouble, fivesocks. ;)

fivesocks
Jun. 23, 2011, 07:26 PM
slightly off topic, but...

CosMonster, perhaps why I hate farmers tans (and distrust sunscreen) is because my legs take sooooooo long to tan...so I all summer I would be walking around with DARK arms, and ghostly white legs. At least with my long sleeve shirts, I am a more even color of paleness.

Canaqua
Jun. 23, 2011, 07:35 PM
I tan with high SPF sunscreen on too! I always have, even with blond hair and green eyes, I see the sun, I tan. I've resolved myself my to wearing a sleeveless shirt to ride in and then just wearing long skirts to work so no one can see how pale my legs are in comparison to my arms.

acoustic
Jun. 23, 2011, 08:03 PM
Mmh.

I am of the mind that if I am out riding my horse, I will where whatever I like. In public and in private. If that includes shorts and half-chaps, so be it. Should it include breeches and low boots to allow for better airflow, I will commit the heinous crime (I even pull my huge socks up to mimic the tall boot protection. I know, I've probably made some eyes bleed). If I have found no better use for that huge T-shirt given away free by my gym, it will become a barn shirt.

Of course, I can't say that I really take myself too seriously. My riding, my horse, YES. As for me? I really could not care less about the judgement being passed on my [often poor] choice of clothing. If someone feels that I am any less of a horsewoman due to some fashion faux pas, I can't imagine that we would get along very well anyway. ;)

danceronice
Jun. 23, 2011, 08:36 PM
Am I the only one who rides in long sleeves even in the summer? I used to be a waitress where we were required to wear white boy's oxford shirts, so now I use them for riding and they are fabulous! Lightweight and loose fitting :)


I've actually thought about wearing my old ratcatchers, minus collars, as they're thinner than t-shirts but long-sleeved. Though they're almost a bit TOO thin for decency and I usually go to the store after the barn (unless I want to strip in the tack room or the BO's home and I can use the bathroom in their house I don't have anywhere to chance.)

hntrjmprpro45
Jun. 23, 2011, 10:38 PM
Am I the only one who rides in long sleeves even in the summer? I used to be a waitress where we were required to wear white boy's oxford shirts, so now I use them for riding and they are fabulous! Lightweight and loose fitting :)

I hate farmers tans, and it doesn't seem to matter how much SPF 9,000 I apply, I will have a farmers tan in just a few rides. I swear these oxford shirts are NOT bad at all, if anything it's nice to have protection from the hot shining sun on my arms, and I pop the collar to keep the sun off my neck :)

I always wear a long sleeved shirt at horse shows when I know I will be in the sun all day. I hate getting fried and having all your enjoy drained by being in the sun all day long!

Rhiannonjk
Jun. 24, 2011, 10:42 AM
I have the nice long sleeved ventilated hiking shirts that I (try to remember to) wear when I'm going to be out in the sun a lot. I've gotten compliments on them at schooling shows (I have one white one that I save and try to keep white...).

Problem is they are really expensive, so I pick them up in January, on the sale racks :)

faybe
Jul. 1, 2011, 11:59 PM
So... sources for *lightweight* long-sleeved shirts in breathable fabrics? That fit a size 10P curvy short woman? I'm getting the evil eye from my dermatologist about riding outside during the day. Yes, I do wear sunscreen!



I shop outfitter stores for fishing shirts with UV protection. Columbia, Patagonia et al make some, and outfitter store brands are usually of equal quality but better price (REI, EMS...). They are quick dry and very durable. I bought 2 for a weeklong rafting trip in the Grand Canyon and with temps at 110+ every day I was comfortable in the heat and dried quickly when I got wet from the river. After my trip I used them to ride in the summer heat (in south Louisiana, where it is plenty humid!) and they breathe quite well.

Here are some examples:

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/Product.aspx?baseno=3208N&cdf=TopSeller

http://www.columbia.com/Women%E2%80%99s-Blood-and-Guts%E2%84%A2-Superlight%E2%84%A2-Long-Sleeve/FL7305,default,pd.html

alicen
Jul. 2, 2011, 07:04 PM
Aunt Esther (National and International Purse Champion)? Where are you?