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wALTzing Matilda
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:02 AM
Here's a hypothetical:

Nice young horse has been in training for a year. Trainer doing a nice job riding the horse, likes horse, has enjoyed success. For various reasons (financial, personal goals, owner wants to ride horse more) the horse needs to be taken out of training.

There is no contract. Does one "give notice?" It seems cold to just call and say services no longer needed, but going into details could invite an argument or negotiating that is preferable to avoid.

stryder
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:08 AM
If you have a good relationship with the trainer, I think it's appropriate to call now, mid-month, and just say horse is coming home (or going wherever) at the end of the month. I wouldn't just show up with the trailer and haul away.

And just say you're looking forward to spending more time with your well-trained horse, thanks for all your good work!

equinelerium
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:17 AM
I agree with stryder-unless there is something negative going on, I'd want to give the trainer a little notice. The trainer may be turning away other potential clients because they are fully booked, or may be somewhat dependent on your monthly payments-especially since they've had them for a year. Giving them a heads up that horsey will be moving on gives them the chance to make other plans.

wALTzing Matilda
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:30 AM
The horse is not boarded with the trainer, not sure if that matters. The primary issue is finances. The owner is already a month behind in payment, partly because bills are not sent regularly. Trainer will be paid in full, but the longer training goes on, the more is owed.

There is also a difference of opinion on how much more development the horse needs before owner should be primary rider. The trainer is fond of the horse, etc etc. Likely tension.

stryder
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:38 AM
If that's the case, the debt should be addressed in the phone call, as in, I'll be paying you $XXX per month after we leave, so you are paid in full by XX date.

Of course trainer likes the horse. It's been there a year. She made it.

If the owner has not been riding the horse, the next couple of weeks should be focused on transitioning the owner to the horse through supervised rides, if that hasn't already been happening. It may cost a bit to do this, but it's in the owner and horse's best interests.

Velvet
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:39 AM
The horse is not boarded with the trainer, not sure if that matters. The primary issue is finances. The owner is already a month behind in payment, partly because bills are not sent regularly. Trainer will be paid in full, but the longer training goes on, the more is owed.

There is also a difference of opinion on how much more development the horse needs before owner should be primary rider. The trainer is fond of the horse, etc etc. Likely tension.

Just give one month's notice (unless the owner will NOT be able to pay that to the trainer) and let the trainer know that due to financial constraints (which should be obvious to the trainer by now) that the horse will no longer be in training.

It's that simple. Nothing else needs to be said. If the trainer has "feelings" related to the situation, they can voice them, but at this point it's financial and if the trainer wants to be paid for their time and effort, then they need to realize the owner will not be able to meet that expectation. If the trainer wants to train for a lower price or for free, then that works. If not, then it's just facts and practicality. No one's feelings should be hurt by that.

Drive NJ
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:41 AM
Whether you are on good terms with the trainer or not
All you really need to do is say
"Im going to put training on hold for a while . . .
Thanks for the good work you've started.
Please send the final bill so I can get all the payments covered
Thanks very much"

and stop going - or remove horse

IF you are at the trainers barn with no time frame contract - its nice to give
"End of Month" notice

DONT BURN BRIDGES

and if there are any negative reactions - just smile and walk away
DONT get involved in any kind of argument - not worth it

alto
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:42 AM
Trainer is a business, 2-4 weeks notice (depending on level of training) would be appropriate even in the absence of a signed contract - if there was a verbal contract for X weeks or until X level was reached, then that is still a commitment ... it sounds as if this is a decision that has been in consideration for awhile - so I can't imagine why such was not communictaed to the trainer :confused:



If the owner has not been riding the horse, the next couple of weeks should be focused on transitioning the owner to the horse through supervised rides, if that hasn't already been happening.
This :yes: :yes: :yes:

Hollie McNeil
Jun. 13, 2011, 11:47 AM
At our farm, we spell this out in the training agreement, which is nice since it keeps both owner and trainer 'in the loop' about what's going on with the horse, and allows the trainer to work with the owner to make the transition smooth.

Talk to your trainer! They (should) want to help.

wALTzing Matilda
Jun. 13, 2011, 12:00 PM
" ... it sounds as if this is a decision that has been in consideration for awhile - so I can't imagine why such was not communictaed to the trainer."

Things look manageable until suddenly they aren't. People change their minds or make decisions based on what's best for them. If notice is that critical shouldn't it be in a contract?

merrygoround
Jun. 13, 2011, 12:23 PM
Some things are basic good manners. Business or not!!

So unless the trainer knew this would be coming, which does not appear to be the case. And unless you are into burning bridges, give notice.

alto
Jun. 13, 2011, 12:33 PM
Things look manageable until suddenly they aren't.
then just sit down with the trainer & say exactly that :)



If notice is that critical shouldn't it be in a contract?
It's not about what's written down on a piece of paper, it's about respect & consideration in regards to how we act/treat others.

wALTzing Matilda
Jun. 13, 2011, 12:36 PM
Hi, these are helpful responses. Thanks.

AlterBy
Jun. 13, 2011, 01:19 PM
" ... it sounds as if this is a decision that has been in consideration for awhile - so I can't imagine why such was not communictaed to the trainer."

Things look manageable until suddenly they aren't. People change their minds or make decisions based on what's best for them. If notice is that critical shouldn't it be in a contract?

There should have had a contract.

Owner and trainer should feel comfortable enough to speak to each others without drama. Especially if there is some financial issues going on. I'm not sure that the Trainer would keep on with the training knowing he's putting the Owner in a bad position and risking not to be paid. (hypothetically of course)

There should not be any tension regarding the training of the horse.

If Owner wants Plan A and Trainer says Plan B (both having good reasons), problems should be discussed and find a solution accordingly for both to be happy. Final decision should be left to Owner. Trainer don't have to agree or keep up with the training if he doesn't believe/like Owner's plan.