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MunchkinsMom
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:22 PM
I was out pulling weeds from the fence line, and spotted a red yellow and black striped snake, not large (maybe a foot and a half long). I took a picture on my cell phone, and when I got up to the house, googled coral snakes, and sure enough, it was a coral snake. :eek:

From what I read, if you don't mess with them you will be safe, I sure hope that is correct.

Of course now I have no clue as to where it is, I just hope it didn't decide to go live in my barn. :eek:

Beethoven
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:24 PM
I have seen one at my barn too, but like you have read they are not aggressive and stick to themselves. I have only seen it once in the 2 1/2 years I have lived here. That was plenty for me!

MassageLady
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:27 PM
Extremely poisenous, and it attacks the nervous system...I'd call someone to have it removed...seriously-don't mess around with them.

kateh
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:27 PM
Did you notice the banding pattern? Some king snake species are mimics that look a heck of a lot like coral snakes but aren't venomous, and are often kept as pets. Easy way to tell: Red and yellow kill a fellow, red and black friend of Jack.

Whitfield Farm Hanoverians
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:29 PM
Yep, Kill the thing whenever you see it again. My outdoorsman uncle used to tell us when we were kids that if a coral snake bit you just pick you out your place to lay down & die!

ellebeaux
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:32 PM
Oh leave the poor snake alone. Their mouths are so small, you'd have to basically shove your pinky in there to get them to bit you.

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herpetology/fl-guide/micrurusffulvius.htm

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herpetology/fl-guide/gettingalong.htm

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:32 PM
I'll try to upload the photo to picture trail, it is definitely a coral snake, the pattern was a black nose, yellow band on it's head, the body bands were black and maroon, with narrow yellow bands between the black and red.

It is exactly like the one in this picture:

http://www.audubonguides.com/species/Reptiles-and-Amphibians/Eastern-Coral-Snake.html

ellebeaux
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:34 PM
Yep, Kill the thing whenever you see it again. My outdoorsman uncle used to tell us when we were kids that if a coral snake bit you just pick you out your place to lay down & die!

I think your uncle was smart to teach kids not to mess with snakes but it isn't quite true that you will immediately die if bit by one:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/771701-clinical

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/771701-overview

This is how rare it is, one death in 40 years:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041010109000853

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:38 PM
Oh leave the poor snake alone. Their mouths are so small, you'd have to basically shove your pinky in there to get them to bit you.

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herpetology/fl-guide/micrurusffulvius.htm

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herpetology/fl-guide/gettingalong.htm

Thanks, I'm going to bookmark that second one, in case I ever do have to relocate a snake (and get clean underwear after I'm done :lol: )

I might have seen one once in my feed room years ago, it was darkish, and it was between some things, and I could not get a good look, so I sprayed it with wasp spray and it slithered out of the barn.

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:50 PM
Here is the picture:

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2147/2908252/5870766/397099494.jpg

ellebeaux
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:51 PM
My only suggestion on doing the removals is make sure you pick a stick that doesn't continuously break by three inches every time you poke it at the snake!

That's how we used to remove nuisance alligators, too.

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:58 PM
My only suggestion on doing the removals is make sure you pick a stick that doesn't continuously break by three inches every time you poke it at the snake!

That's how we used to remove nuisance alligators, too.

Trust me, any attempt at removal would be with the manure fork at the very least!

ellebeaux
Jun. 4, 2011, 11:11 PM
Here is the picture:

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2147/2908252/5870766/397099494.jpg

Wow. Looks like a coral snake to me :)

I've only seen them twice, in Florida. And oddly, on the same day, about an hour and a couple miles apart from each other. So I assume it wasn't the same snake stalking me...

everafterfarm
Jun. 4, 2011, 11:50 PM
yep, looks like a coral to me too. Red touching yellow kill a fellow!

I had one on the side of my barn that my cat was playing with! Stupid cat!! The poor snake was just trying to get away from her actually.(yes, kitty is fine) However, since they are so poisonous(yes, i know their heads are tiny, but still) and kitty sent it running into a stall with a preg horse in it. I opened stall, smacked horsey on butt to get her to run out and I removed his little head with my shovel.

I love the nonpoisonous snakes around though! Have tons of corn snakes that I am always practically stepping over!

Pancakes
Jun. 4, 2011, 11:52 PM
Red and yellow, kill a fellow. (Coral snake)
Red and black, friend of Jack. (King snake)

Yours looks like a coral snake!

Also might be worth knowing that Coral snake antivenom is no longer being made in the US, period. There are some hospitals and places that have stocked up with whatever is still left, but people might be looking to Mexico to get more if needed...

And for whoever says that envenomation is highly unlikely... we've seen at LEAST 2-3 cases in the last year of dogs who've been bitten and subsequently died (or euthanized...care is extremely expensive due to the need to put a dog on the ventilator).

*Liz*
Jun. 5, 2011, 12:53 AM
I saw the thread and figured you must be from FL ;) Growing up in Ft Myers, I can recall encountering more than my fair share of coral snakes. Most of them were to be found at the barn.

One barn in particular I remember seeing several. It backed up to hundreds of acres of mostly uncleared land with cows and lots of wildlife in it. At least twice I remember a barn cat presenting us boarders with a young dead coral snake. Those were memorable, and we were all thankful the cats never managed to get bit.

I would not try to remove or relocate the snake as you risk aggravating it. Leave it alone, take a picture if you wish, and it will move on and not bother you. Good find though!

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 5, 2011, 01:40 AM
Guess it is another good reason for wearing gloves when doing barn work.

Anyone know if the horses might be at risk, or would the snake most likely just slither away from the horses?

everafterfarm
Jun. 5, 2011, 10:01 AM
Corals are pretty passive. I would not worry too much about the horses if they are in an open field. They would need to corner or step on mr. snake to get him to bite. Snakes can't hear, so they "feel" the ground, something the size of a horse they will want to stay away from.

hosspuller
Jun. 5, 2011, 10:26 AM
Did you notice the banding pattern? Some king snake species are mimics that look a heck of a lot like coral snakes but aren't venomous, and are often kept as pets. Easy way to tell: Red and yellow kill a fellow, red and black friend of Jack.

Not quite complete... A little knowledge is dangerous :winkgrin:

'If red touches yellow, it can kill a fellow' (Eastern Coral Snake)

'If red touches black, it is a friend of Jack' (Scarlet Kingsnake or Scarlet Snake)

From this site .. http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herpetology/fl-guide/micrurusffulvius.htm

kateh
Jun. 5, 2011, 12:54 PM
Sorry! Guess I was assuming everyone knew the "touches" part.

Equibrit
Jun. 5, 2011, 01:21 PM
There are ALWAYS snakes around, you just don't see them. Why, because somebody happens to catch sight of one, are y'all bent on killing it.

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 5, 2011, 04:40 PM
There are ALWAYS snakes around, you just don't see them. Why, because somebody happens to catch sight of one, are y'all bent on killing it.

Notice I didn't kill the snake, I took his picture and let him go on his way, even though I found online that they eat frogs, toads and lizards, and I am fond of my frogs, toads and lizards because they eat bugs!

My main concern is my nitwit dogs that must check out anything that moves, I am constantly shouting "LEAVE IT" whenever I catch them nosing about in the bushes.