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View Full Version : Dutrow in court - says he's "good for racing"



Mara
Jun. 4, 2011, 08:14 PM
http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/63394/dutrow-i-think-im-good-for-racing-game

Sure, like arsenic is good for weight loss.

GingerJumper
Jun. 4, 2011, 10:01 PM
Sure, like arsenic is good for weight loss.

HAHAHAHAHA! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Zipping up flame suit, but I've never liked Dutrow at all. In fact, I rather dislike him. A lot... Alright, I hate him. There, I said it. Nobody shoot me please! :uhoh:

evntr5218
Jun. 6, 2011, 12:28 AM
HAHAHAHAHA! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Zipping up flame suit, but I've never liked Dutrow at all. In fact, I rather dislike him. A lot... Alright, I hate him. There, I said it. Nobody shoot me please! :uhoh:

ditto!!!
he is ridiculous. her should be banned from all tracks and all things racing!!!

danceronice
Jun. 6, 2011, 02:17 AM
Well, every time he's fined or banned, he makes racing look like it's actually addressing the problem trainers...I'm sure that's not what he had in mind, though.

kcmel
Jun. 6, 2011, 10:25 AM
:lol::lol::lol::lol: etc. Talk about delusional!

Xctrygirl
Jun. 6, 2011, 11:12 AM
http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/63394/dutrow-i-think-im-good-for-racing-game

Sure, like arsenic is good for weight loss.

You know you're gonna laugh but... We had a mare at the track who was dropping weight and seriously the 1 shot of arsenic she got turned it around. (Trainer gave the order, not me. I just had to hold her)

(This in no way implies that I am Pro-Dutrow)

But sometimes arsenic does work.

~Emily

betonbill
Jun. 6, 2011, 11:55 AM
Didn't a lot of trainers routinely give an arsenic "tonic" to horses in the early 1900s?

red mares
Jun. 6, 2011, 12:49 PM
Didn't a lot of trainers routinely give an arsenic "tonic" to horses in the early 1900s?

I know trainers used to give it saddlehorses in the 40s and 50s; put a shine on their coat, and added some bloom. Of course, they had to be careful not to overdue it. Nux Vomica (strychnine) does the same thing.

Flying Fox
Jun. 6, 2011, 04:37 PM
The riddle of the mysterious death of Australia's most famous
racehorse
may have been solved more than 75 years after his death.

Phar Lap probably died as a result of arsenic administered by his own
trainer, rather than being murdered by American gangsters as
Australians
have long believed. That is the conclusion of experts who have studied
a
"recipe book" of tonics used by Phar Lap's trainer, Harry Telford,
which
sold at auction yesterday for close to £18,000.

Among the ingredients the tonics contained were arsenic, strychnine,
belladonna, cocaine and caffeine – given to horses in small
quantities in
the past, as stimulants, before a race.

tradewind
Jun. 6, 2011, 10:53 PM
They used to give arsenic to show dogs, particularly bitches of the coated breeds back in the day to keep them from blowing coat, particularly after seasons or for dogs who did not eat well...There are many other old "tricks of the trade" in dogs, so it does not surprise me that they were used on horses worth big bucks back in the same time period. I believe there has been alot said about cocaine being used to relieve Sir Bartons chronically sore feet.

Flypony
Jun. 6, 2011, 11:06 PM
Arsenic in a small dose to keep them eating is called Fulmers solution. It works.

pinkdiamondracing
Jun. 7, 2011, 12:02 AM
HAHAHAHAHA! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Zipping up flame suit, but I've never liked Dutrow at all. In fact, I rather dislike him. A lot... Alright, I hate him. There, I said it. Nobody shoot me please! :uhoh:

Appy--- me too!!! I despise the man!!!

He and Patrick "The Butcher" Biancone both

danceronice
Jun. 7, 2011, 10:50 AM
Arsenic's not all that bad, actually, for a heavy metal poison. Even in humans, it does make your hair shiney and it takes a realtively high amount per kg of body weight to be fatal. You can build up an immunity much more easily than to other common poisons and eventually take what would be acutely fatal doses without harm. (I would NOT suggest trying that with strychnine, and it's theoretically possible to have a nonlethal dose of cyanide, but I wouldn't try that, either.) I have to question it being an "accidental overdose" or arsenic with Phar Lap as it would take a LOT of arsenic to kill a horse at one go, especially one who's already getting it.

Now strychnine (nasty way to die; it's a convulsive) I could see. And belladonna (nightshade/digitalis); it CAN be used therapeutically and still is, but if you screw up the dose it stops the heart. I could see that, or belladonna in combination with cocaine (what genius thought THAT one up?)

The expression I read regarding Sir Barton was that for whatever reason he ran "coked to the gills."

Really, by comparison some of our most needle-happy modern trainers look like models of reserve.

Big_Tag
Jun. 7, 2011, 10:54 AM
This is a really old "pre-race cocktail" I've heard of, far before my time, but apparently a little Clorox in the veins was a performance enhancer.

Yikes.

GingerJumper
Jun. 7, 2011, 11:42 AM
Hm, maybe I'll just put some arsenic in the Appy's noms before my next show... Puisannce time, baby!!

(just for the record, I'm completely kidding. But that was too good to resist).

Blinkers On
Jun. 7, 2011, 07:33 PM
http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/63394/dutrow-i-think-im-good-for-racing-game

Sure, like arsenic is good for weight loss.

Hmm though this was tongue in cheek, Arsenic is great for stimulating apetite. Dick however is poison ;)

WhiteCamry
Jun. 9, 2011, 02:44 PM
The riddle of the mysterious death of Australia's most famous
racehorse
may have been solved more than 75 years after his death.

Phar Lap probably died as a result of arsenic administered by his own
trainer, rather than being murdered by American gangsters as
Australians
have long believed. That is the conclusion of experts who have studied
a
"recipe book" of tonics used by Phar Lap's trainer, Harry Telford,
which
sold at auction yesterday for close to £18,000.

Among the ingredients the tonics contained were arsenic, strychnine,
belladonna, cocaine and caffeine – given to horses in small
quantities in
the past, as stimulants, before a race.
I wish I could recall where I read this, but there was a Preakness favorite during WW1 - I think "Sun" was part of his name - who died of arsenic poisoning just before the race. The newspapers of the day raged about "the dastardly deed" with no hint that arsenic was a standard treatment in the horseracing game.

findeight
Jun. 9, 2011, 03:50 PM
Perhaps Dutrow is correct and he is good for racing... whatever it is they may race on Omega Alpha VI in the Centari system.

I'l flag down the Romulan black ops cloaked warbird and pay his fare.;)

One hopes they race some type of nasty predator that is smarter then he is.