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CdnRider
May. 30, 2011, 09:37 PM
they are underneath the gooseneck. what do i do? need to use trailer tomorrow. there are 2 eggs and 2 hatchlings. they are going to die arent they? ):

MeghanDACVA
May. 30, 2011, 09:42 PM
If you move the trailer, yes they are going to die. I have tried moving nests when this happens but it never seems to work. If you can stomach it you can "dispatch" the hatchlings quickly. As for the nest and eggs, robins aren't an endangered species ;-) But they really do have pretty eggs.

pj
May. 30, 2011, 10:27 PM
they are underneath the gooseneck. what do i do? need to use trailer tomorrow. there are 2 eggs and 2 hatchlings. they are going to die arent they? ):
How long will you be gone?
A couple of years ago I came home to my grandson saying to my husband "she's going to kill us isn't she?" :lol: Dh husband replied "what do you mean US?" The boy had kicked over a old stump in the pasture not knowing there was a nest of blue birds in it. He and dh had gathered up the babies as the nest was torn up and had them in a box. They'd probably had the babies for an hour.

I made them go out and set the stump back in the ground and salvaged what i could of the nest. Put the babies back in the now enlarged hole and watched from a distance. Mom and Dad bird immediately started caring for their children.


If you aren't going to be gone long could you put the babies back where they were when you came back? If not ":) have you ever handfed baby birds before?

CdnRider
May. 30, 2011, 10:36 PM
Thanks for the replies! The trailer isn't going back there, the horse is moving to a new barn. I feel bad. I was already thinking I was going to have to "dispatch" them. Oh well....c'est la vie.....albeit a short one.

grayarabs
May. 30, 2011, 11:06 PM
Actually I think it is illegal to cause them harm. If you must move the trailer then find an appropriate place for the nest somewhere nearby.

Have someone monitor the nest - if abandoned by parents - try a wildlife rehab.

yellowbritches
May. 30, 2011, 11:09 PM
A couple of years ago a friend drove down from PA to our farm in MD and while unhitching she found a nest, complete with some very cranky hatchlings, in the top of her trailer hitch (under the goose neck, up at the very top of the post). We contemplated what to do with them for awhile, then her mom (who lives in down) came and took the nest to a local wildlife rescue center. They took the babies and nursed them until I presume they could be released. Maybe you could do something similar?

coloredcowhorse
May. 30, 2011, 11:36 PM
If there is a shrub or tree nearby could you very carefully (use gloves to cut down on human contact smell) move the nest to it? Be prepared for parent birds to dive bomb and screech at you. Had a fledgling land on my roof once upon a time, couldn't get back to the nest and mom fed it for several more days (and threatened me with death by pecking and wing swipes if I went anywhere near it)...last seen managing a short flight to a nearby tree so hopefully made it. One really unhappy mother though.

jetsmom
May. 31, 2011, 03:17 AM
I'd try to move nest nearby and watch to see if mom returns. If not, then take to a wildlife rehab ctr.

Sipsi
May. 31, 2011, 02:00 PM
If you move the trailer, yes they are going to die. I have tried moving nests when this happens but it never seems to work. If you can stomach it you can "dispatch" the hatchlings quickly. As for the nest and eggs, robins aren't an endangered species ;-) But they really do have pretty eggs.

WHOA! All birds are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (except for pigeons, starlings and English sparrows). That means that you cannot harm, harass or have in your possession a feather, nest, egg or parts of any protected bird.
Technically, you cannot move a nest either without USFWS permission - but the reality is that you need to move the trailer.

If there is a tree or appropriate bush near (and I mean 10 to 15'), please put the nest and birds into a hanging basket and hang it there. Monitor the nest for the next few hours to see if the parents will accept the new nest. 9 times our of 10 they do. Don't worry about touching them, the parents don't care. If you need to remove them, contact a wildlife rehabilitator. If you need help contacting a rehaber, please PM me!

Calvincrowe
May. 31, 2011, 05:19 PM
Birds can't "smell", so no worries on handling them. Just move the nest close by. If momma and daddy Robin are yelling at you from nearby, then they'll locate their nest from the fledgling's peeping.

I've relocated swallow's nests with much success. Heck, I've put baby swallows back in the nest several times.

And, yeah, they are protected species, as are all songbirds and migratory waterfowl.

2DogsFarm
Jun. 1, 2011, 03:54 PM
I have this problem nearly every year.

Last year Mom Robin built her nest on top of my front door porch light.
Every time anyone came to the house she went nuts screeching & divebombing.

This year I had a nest above my back door porchlight and a 2nd one built on the spare tire of my GN.
We had some godawful rain & windstorms but both managed to survive and baby robins fledged & took off within a couple weeks of hatching.

The ones on my spare were just below eye-level & I watched the three babies from pipping to fledging to their first bumbling test-flights. :yes:
Mom observed (shrieking) but never swooped at me.

Interesting to know that if I had needed to move the trailer I could try relocating the nest.
Thanks, wildlife experts :D

Foxtrot's
Jun. 1, 2011, 04:43 PM
Hope this is a message of hope - we had a starling shove the baby swallows out of the nest, not once, but twice. Three of the four survived being picked up and put back into the nest and the parents continued on as before, despite the absence of the babies for a while. Second time I waited for the starling to come back and whacked at it with a corn broom, almost missing it, but sent a good message to it and it never came back.

You will at least have tried and feel better for the birds.

CdnRider
Jun. 2, 2011, 12:02 AM
Update - I moved the nest as nearby as I could. I found an old abandoned nest, so I figured it was in a safe spot...although after reading this, maybe I wasn't supposed to move the abandoned nest either, to make way for the relocated nest. Anyways, I monitored the area for a bit and the parent birds were close by on fence post.
Thanks for all the bird info. I had no idea there were so many regulations!

Calvincrowe
Jun. 2, 2011, 12:16 AM
Yay! Bird parents are pretty smart, and you didn't break any rules by moving an abandoned nest. Let us know how it all works out.

trinityhill
Jun. 2, 2011, 01:18 AM
And I thought I was the only one with the trailer nest problem... Every spring I end up having it out with a robin regarding placing a nest on my GN spare tire... It results in moving the beginnings of a nest 4-5 times a day for about a week off of the tire before they get the hint that the tree right next to the trailer is a much better idea (and they say birds are smart...). Had to move it with eggs the first year... parents accepted the new location just fine, but would prefer not to have to so we go with the move before built method.

Leprechaun
Jun. 2, 2011, 06:45 AM
Sorry for you CdnRider. You can only do what you can. I wiped out an entire nest full of hatchlings a number of years ago and still feel guilty. I thought there was just hay stuck in the works as I was trying to close my big barn sliders before a storm one summer. What was gumming up the works wasn't hay! Lots and lots of tears. Hope it works out.

TrueColours
Jun. 2, 2011, 07:40 AM
I had Momma Robin try and build her nest on the battery box of the G/N - a crumpled up large empty shavings bag thwarted THAT attempt!

She then moved 6 feet back where my cold water tank is located on the trailer and has a nice flat, protected 6 x 2 area that was PERFECT for a nest - crumpled up shavings bags went there as well and then she, too - very intelligently selected a tree about 15-20 feet away instead

I have to give her "A" for effort though - that water tank would make the perfect bird condo complex for sure! :lol:

Big_Grey_hunter
Jun. 2, 2011, 08:01 AM
Hope this is a message of hope - we had a starling shove the baby swallows out of the nest, not once, but twice. Three of the four survived being picked up and put back into the nest and the parents continued on as before, despite the absence of the babies for a while. Second time I waited for the starling to come back and whacked at it with a corn broom, almost missing it, but sent a good message to it and it never came back.

You will at least have tried and feel better for the birds.

:lol: Thanks for protecting the swallows, they are neat birds :)

jenm
Jun. 2, 2011, 06:46 PM
So how are the birds doing? I didn't know about this thread and starting my own nest thread in the OT forum. I have a nest with house finch hatchlings and need haul my horse to a show this weekend. I don't have a lot of options for moving the nest, so was thinking of trying to protect it under the gooseneck while I was gone.

Still not sure what I'm going to do.