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mortebella
May. 29, 2011, 09:54 PM
What are your coping strategies for showing when the mercury zooms to 90 and the heat index is god-knows what? At a show this weekend I felt weak and forgot part of two of my courses and just generally rode like crap, then was sick and had a severe migraine that night. I didn't have symptoms of heat exhaustion and took care to stay hydrated. The season's just starting. I'm in the best shape I've been in since I started re-riding several years ago, and for reference, I nailed these same courses a month ago (and we were 1st in 3 out of 5 and 2nd in the other 2), when it was oh, 10+ degrees cooler. My poor horse. I simply apparently COULD. NOT. THINK.:(

Hunter Mom
May. 29, 2011, 10:05 PM
Living here, we have no options other than cope or quit riding for months. A few things that help...

- Drink water, water and more water. Not just at the show but the day before, during and after.
- If showing, wear your coat only for the course. Put it on just before you go in and take it off as soon as you get done. Same for your helmet - they both trap heat. I went to one show where they actually said we were NOT to wear coats, so make sure a nice polo is in your bag, too.
- Wear lighter-weight breeches. I have a couple pairs of lighter (Ariat?) fabric that are really good when it's hot outside.
- Take shoes to wear when you're not showing. Getting out of boots is always a good feeling.
- Use a squirt bottle to mist your face when you get over-heated.

jewll27
May. 29, 2011, 10:09 PM
those are all symptoms of heat exhaustion so no matter how much you drank, make sure you drink twice as much esp while riding

when its really hot, I always make sure I have a big bottle of water in the ring with me and drink the entire time.

kateh
May. 29, 2011, 10:17 PM
I agree, you probably had heat exhaustion, or at the very least dehydration. Nausea and severe headache are both symptoms of dehydration. Recommended water intake is about 2L for a woman, but I would even increase that for exercising on hot days. If you think you're overheating run cold water over your wrists for a while, and soak a bandanna for your face and neck.

Hawks Nest
May. 29, 2011, 10:20 PM
I second what everyone else is saying. Also drink Gatorade. If it is hot you are sweating and the gaterade helps replenish what you are loosing. Split that with the water and it'll help.

I would be more help but it has been far too long since i competed in anything other than heavy cold rain (aka when my mom is a wimp and lets me take her horse in the rain.)

snaffle635
May. 29, 2011, 10:32 PM
I feel your pain! Last year at Kentucky, I did a childrens/adult hunter classic with two rounds. Twelve were called back for the second round. About 3/4th of the way through the first round, I was standing in 12th place and it was so hot I DID NOT want to ride again. When someone finally knocked me into 13th place, I cheered!

One of the problems I have is not being acclimated to the heat. I work in an office and I'm not used to being outside. Then I show up to the horse show on the weekend when it's 90+ and it's really difficult to adjust.

So, having learned this about myself, I do the following:

* try to spend a time outside in the heat for a day or two before the show - maybe go to the pro days

* unlike the poster above, I keep my jacket on while I'm warming up. Letting your jacket get all sweaty, while completely disgusting, keeps me cooler.

* I put on my show shirt and breeches first thing in the morning, no matter when I'm showing. I've found it more difficult to change from shorts/tank into show clothes...just makes the show clothes seem even more hot.

mortebella
May. 29, 2011, 10:40 PM
I think I overestimated my ability to cope by an order of magnitude. I am usually not w/o gatorade when it starts getting hot, but - shezam!- I'd run out that day and just blew off stopping at the convenience store as a stop I didn't want to make on a busy day. WRONG!!! I did drink water, but it probably wasn't enough. I didn't think about dehydration. I was shaking, I felt so bad. And I knew it wasn't just nerves. I hate pinning a back number to my coat because it always seems to damage the fabric (the wind never fails to be blowing some crazy way, no matter how carefully you pin it down :(), and I wasn't wanting to take my coat off and tie and retie my number string every time, but I'll jolly well pin that puppy on so I can wriggle out of that torture suit next time. Most of the next day my muscles were stiff and sore like somebody who doesn't even ride, which I put down to lack of electrolytes.

Horseshoe Creek
May. 29, 2011, 10:47 PM
A friend, who is a mailman, says they are always told if it's going to be hot, hydrate the day Before. Of course, also hydrate that day.
I find those neck coolers, with the microbeads in them are absolute life savers in hot weather.

Chris

mortebella
May. 29, 2011, 10:51 PM
See, Snaffle, I think like you do. I feel like I'm better off if I just put the clothes on and stick with them. But now I wonder if it bit me in the a$$ this time. I too work in air conditioning that's fairly ridiculous - it's a large municiple building where the chillers are set on 60 degrees. I am never without long sleeves AND a sweater. The way this year has played out, with extreme thunderstorms cooling things off and since I ride in the late evenings, there have only been a couple of really hot days I've schooled on - and I had really sucky rides, too :) (Although I didn't forget where I was going :p)

Hinderella
May. 29, 2011, 10:51 PM
My husband bought acooling vest from a company called TechNiche, which he uses when riding his motorcycle.
You soak it with water and wear it under your jacket....maybe one would even fit under your shirt. He says it does a great job of keeping him cool, even on long, hot rides. I'm not sure how it would fit under a show coat, but it might be worth a try. I would put up a link, but I still can't figure out how with this iPad!

Rel6
May. 29, 2011, 10:54 PM
I resign myself to a day of misery. Long horse show days (hot/cold/perfect) kill me, migraine wise. I'm very prone and it seems like no matter how careful I am to literally CHUG water/gatorade, eat, and take ibuprofen at the start I am doomed to feel nauseous, headachy, and absolutely miserable by around 2pm. I have migraine meds that work well, but they give me muscle cramps in my arms and still leave me nauseous. I learned early that muscle cramps + 3'9'' jumper course + very strong 17.2 warmblood = a very ugly ride and uncomfortable ride.

My suggestions? Go to bed early. Nyquil at 6pm the night before if you have to. I'm a person whose normal bedtime is about 1 or 2 am, if I have to wake up at four or five to get to a show, the lack of sleep triggers a migraine. I take tylenol pm and go to bed early enough to get eight hours of sleep, doesn't prevent the headache but staves it off until later in the day. Found this out when I accidentally took nyquil instead of dayquil the evening before a show. Now when I was showing consistently I didn't do it, I'm not a fan of meds other than ibuprofen, but this summer I'm showing about once a month and I never take sleep aids otherwise.

katarine
May. 29, 2011, 10:54 PM
Same day hydration is fine, just keep after it/keep up with it. Propel and Gatorade both make the dry powder mixes, keep some of those on hand for show days when water is around, but maybe not Gatorade.

Go Easy on the salt, food wise.
Banamas are good for replacing potassium.
The wicking fabrics make a difference, and as soon as I can I get out of those boots and into tennis shoes or other cool shoes.

HGem
May. 29, 2011, 11:10 PM
On hot days I wait till I am ready to warm up to put my breeches and a polo on. Then wait till I have to get ready for my class to put the rest of the garb on. I too like to leave it on once it's on. The thought of putting it back on once it's off is so much worse than keeping it on for a few rounds for me. I am not much of a headache person - but as others said I would prob pop some ibu/advil/your preference. The following is what I do for those hot summer shows:

*Drink cold water/gatorade
*Eat lots of fruit and good non-junky food during the day! I know lots of friends who get weak/dizzy at shows if they don't eat. Best thing is to pack a cooler and stay away from the horse-show food.
*Stay in shade as much as possible
*Get plenty of sleep (I sometimes pack show clothes and such two days beforehand so I don't end up staying up late cleaning boots, etc).
*Eat a hearty breakfast! Even at 4am, stuff in that banana and cereal or egg sandwhich. Not a donut!
*Strip down to shorts and a tanktop as soon as my horse is untacked and sponged down
*If jackets are optional - TAKE IT OFF! Always pack a nice polo and a few extra shirts. I have a shortsleeve one for under my jacket on hot days and a long sleeve one for when jackets are excused.

Thankfully I've never had a problem at a show - minus the just being miserably hot and wondering whoever thought of wearing all that clothing while showing was an idiot....but I think that is inevitable :D

mortebella
May. 29, 2011, 11:11 PM
oooooooo, Rel6, that is a tough scenario. You have the serious migraines like I have. I have daily meds that I have to take, and rescue meds for when I get a break-through migraine. The headache I got after this show, rescue meds would not fix. This was not the first such non-responsive post-show headache I've had. Horse show days can just be too long. But it was the first time I've experienced such a degree of confusion while trying to ride and ridden so considerably below what I'm capable of just because I wasn't able to concentrate. When I was so sick and miserable that night (AND upset with myself) I really had to think back on other times (at least one of which ended in an ER) and ask myself if showing was/is a reasonable goal for someone with an on-going pain issue like mine. I'm comforted to know I'm not the only one who struggles with it.

Rel6
May. 30, 2011, 12:32 AM
oooooooo, Rel6, that is a tough scenario. You have the serious migraines like I have. I have daily meds that I have to take, and rescue meds for when I get a break-through migraine. The headache I got after this show, rescue meds would not fix. This was not the first such non-responsive post-show headache I've had. Horse show days can just be too long. But it was the first time I've experienced such a degree of confusion while trying to ride and ridden so considerably below what I'm capable of just because I wasn't able to concentrate. When I was so sick and miserable that night (AND upset with myself) I really had to think back on other times (at least one of which ended in an ER) and ask myself if showing was/is a reasonable goal for someone with an on-going pain issue like mine. I'm comforted to know I'm not the only one who struggles with it.

I hear ya! I showed all day at HITs on Friday...it was the first really hot day too. Then I had a 3hr drive home. I was tired/nauseous/headachey- not a good combo, especially driving. Just kept staring at the time left until I got home on my GPS hoping it moved faster.

I ride IHSA also, and we host shows. So that is three full days of set-up, riding, horse handling, etc. Everyone resents the lazy person not pulling their weight, which is what I can across as when I get so dizzy I have to sit down (at lets face it, "I have a headache" comes across as the lamest excuse ever) . Our BM gets bad migraines too though so she is very sympathetic.

What do you take? I have prescription strength ibuprofen when I feel one coming on, and Treximet for severe headaches. But the treximent makes me EXTREMELY nauseous the first hour after I take it, and muscle cramps for the rest of the day. Plus its about $300 for 9 pills :eek:

MadeYaLook
May. 30, 2011, 01:19 AM
I can get bad migraine type headaches too if I don't eat properly when it is hot and going to be a long day. So I second the get something substantial in your stomach in the morning(ie. bananas, cereal). During the show try to stay away from greasy and salty foods (though a little salt isn't bad)- if you suffer from nervous show stomach try some cold cut up watermelon which is easy on your stomach and gives you some fluid. I try to stay away from too much caffeine as it does dehydrate you but I must confess if I don't get some in I will get a headache from "withdrawal" so I drink that first and then try to stay with water or Gatorade for the rest of the day.
One other trick you can try that is very refreshing during the day is to take wash cloths and soak with water with some astringent(Seabreeze), slightly wring out and then fold them up and put in a ziploc bag and freeze them. The morning of the show take the bags and put in your cooler. Take a few up to the ring with you and periodically wipe your face and back of neck with the cold cloths- the astringent kind of works like ammonia when your feeling faint only nicer and you get the added benefit of keeping your pores open and clean on your face. My students do this over the summer when we lesson and it really helps. I use this when I come off the cross country course and trust me it will revive you.

DarkStarrx
May. 30, 2011, 01:35 AM
I was just thinking about making a thread for this on the way home from the barn. I knew COTHers would have some tips. I was dying in the heat today! I get terrible migraines with about 10000 causes, and even though I take my daily medication, I still had 2 migraines this week! I hate the summer :(

I'm going to try all of these tips tomorrow! Going to be 90degrees all day even by 7 at night!!



What do you take? I have prescription strength ibuprofen when I feel one coming on, and Treximet for severe headaches. But the treximent makes me EXTREMELY nauseous the first hour after I take it, and muscle cramps for the rest of the day. Plus its about $300 for 9 pills

Don't take ibuprofen, it only masks the migraine and doesn't get rid of it. Treximet made me sick too, and didn't work so I had to try something different. I've tried them all...
Ask your doctor/neuro to give you another medicine. It sounds as if yours are bad enough to warrant daily meds with rescue meds.

jevousaime
May. 30, 2011, 04:52 AM
I used to suffer from heat exhaustion, and I even passed out during an in-hand class back when I did 4-H forever ago.

If you feel like you are exhausted or feel like you are getting cooler, it is a sign of a heat stroke coming on. You need to get ice and put it on your THROAT (not forehead) immediately. If you do not sweat much, you need to drink more water. Gatorade and other sugary things do not really hydrate you, they merely put electrolytes in your body. Stay away from caffeine as well, it also makes you dehydrated. When summer heats reach the 90's you should be drinking about a gallon of water a day if you spend time outside so you sweat more. Drink lots and lots of water.

Also, if you use antiperspirant deodorant, it keeps you from sweating. Sweating is healthy! switch to Toms. instead of preventing you from sweating it kills odor causing bacteria. Sweating keeps you cool so it is imperative to drink plenty of water so you sweat more. And again, if you feel too hot put ice on your throat.

I also normally warm up in my coat so it gets nice and sweaty. It's disgusting, I know, but it is the body's natural way of keeping us cool.

jevousaime
May. 30, 2011, 04:53 AM
I was just thinking about making a thread for this on the way home from the barn. I knew COTHers would have some tips. I was dying in the heat today! I get terrible migraines with about 10000 causes, and even though I take my daily medication, I still had 2 migraines this week! I hate the summer :(

I'm going to try all of these tips tomorrow! Going to be 90degrees all day even by 7 at night!!



Don't take ibuprofen, it only masks the migraine and doesn't get rid of it. Treximet made me sick too, and didn't work so I had to try something different. I've tried them all...
Ask your doctor/neuro to give you another medicine. It sounds as if yours are bad enough to warrant daily meds with rescue meds.


The majority of headaches are caused by dehydration. Drink more water :)

I, on the other hand, get headaches from the sun because my eyes are very sensitive. Sunglasses are a great invention :D

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 08:05 AM
I am back to plain ol' Imitrex for a rescue med. I've taken everything else at one time or another and nothing was any more effective/reliable although Zomig was pretty good, in the nasal spray form - but hella expensive, and no generic. I get 100 mg generics and cut them up. Believe me, I go through enough of them to make this worthwhile. I also take 400 mgs. a day of generic topomax (an anti-epileptic.) That one has been a godsend and the only reason I don't have a headache every other day, since all my work for over 10 years has been on computers and the eyestrain - oy vey. And I TOTALLY get it about people giving you the stink eye over having to quit for a minute because your head hurts. Even my sister used to give me crap - perfect example, day at the beach, me: "I have to leave NOW or I'll be sick, there's too much light and heat!!" Her: "What are you, some kind of weirdo?" Until she was forced to share a hotel room with me sometime in our twenties and she actually SAW a full-on migraine in progress and she literally thought I was going to die. From then on out if she saw me getting green around the gills she made all due haste to get me out of whatever situation she had got me into LOL. And her son inherited the tendency too. For years neither one of us had prescription meds and we both lived on Goody's powders. It was a family joke - the first time I shot one in front of him, I saw him scrutinizing me closely and I wondered WTF. I proceed on with my age old ritual and suddenly he shouted, "YES!!! You lick the paper too!!"

sonomacounty
May. 30, 2011, 08:06 AM
Severe, severe heat-o-phobic here. Give me two falls or two winters and someone take my $*&^ summer, please. Gross, miserable, horrid season. (It makes me depressed, too, cause all you can do comfortably is sit around - how exciting. :(

"I find those neck coolers, with the microbeads in them are absolute life savers in hot weather."

That for sure.

Besides all the other ideas, (I'd try out the Nyquil a few times first, to see how you react to it, though.), get a great freezer pack and load it with neck coolers. Also, I make helmet cooler sponges - cut a new kitchen sponge into 1/4, soak in water, freeze. Put lots in your freezer bag, before putting on helmet, take one out, wrap in paper towel, put in top of helmet, (hopefully it fits, if not make smaller ones), you now have homemade "cool caps".

I do the frozen neck wraps & frozen helmet sponges all summer - or else I'd not get through.

Oh, there are many things that have much, much more potassium than bananas - do a search. People always say bananas, though (?)

Wishing you cool, fall (the glorious, the ultimate season) thoughts.

Roo
May. 30, 2011, 10:47 AM
Mortebella, I feel your pain! Both heat and bright light (any long day outside) are headache triggers for me. There's a lot of great advice posted so far, but here are my tips:

Tuck a Coolmedics (coolmedics.com) cap in your hat.

Ride in the darkest sunglasses you can find and wear them all day at the show. Even in the equitation, the judges don't seem to mind.

Buy a large visor and put it over the brim of your hat. Just remember to pull it off before you go in the ring. I've gotten scolded a time or two for putting in a beautiful round with my unsightly visor still on my hat!

Wear coolmax show shirts. They make a huge difference!

Invest in a ventilated helmut like the GPA Speed Air.

I also vote for Gatorade in addition to water. For some reason protein is also key. Make sure you eat a substantial and healthy breakfast.

Take migraine medicine at the very first inkling of trouble. If you wait until you have a full blown headache at the end of the day, it's too late.

Try to condition yourself as much as possible at home. Ride extra horses, take off your stirrups and hit the gym - I just wish I had time to follow my own advice!

Hope this helps.

sonomacounty
May. 30, 2011, 11:07 AM
"Tuck a Coolmedics (coolmedics.com) cap in your hat. "

I just told you how to make my home made version. Works just as well & free.

Roo
May. 30, 2011, 11:17 AM
Sonomacounty, your homemade cool cap sounds inventive and great. The Cool Medics caps that I suggested are convenient for horse shows because they don't have to be frozen. You just get them wet to activate the cooling feature.

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 11:24 AM
I think this advice is very practical. I had no IDEA so many other migraineurs rode :) Hugs to you all.

I try to catch my HA's early, but I usually dose low. Something to consider is WHAT I've been doing. A low dose is probably worth a try if I haven't set myself up for a monster with an activity like a day at a horse show, but is laughable if I have. Heroic strengths are called for and you would THINK that would be obvious, wouldn't you? LOL

I ride in Coolmax shirts and LOVE them, but I was not aware of how many cooling products there were out there and they're well worth a try. WOOT! I'm a big traditionalist and not a fan of the look of Speed Airs, but there's a big difference in the heat of my head between my ventilated schooling hat and my CO Hampton. For now I'll be pulling it off and hair net be d@mned.

And sunglasses, yeah! Kick a$$. Forgot all about riding in sunglasses for years because somebody (GM, maybe?) had a gripe about them, and I thought, oooo, bad, must put those away. Well, screw you, whoever. My eyes hurt. :D

Thanks, everyone, SOOOOOOOOOO much. :)

Hunter Mom
May. 30, 2011, 02:27 PM
Mortebella, I feel your pain! Both heat and bright light (any long day outside) are headache triggers for me. There's a lot of great advice posted so far, but here are my tips:

Tuck a Coolmedics (coolmedics.com) cap in your hat.

Ride in the darkest sunglasses you can find and wear them all day at the show. Even in the equitation, the judges don't seem to mind.

Buy a large visor and put it over the brim of your hat. Just remember to pull it off before you go in the ring. I've gotten scolded a time or two for putting in a beautiful round with my unsightly visor still on my hat!

Wear coolmax show shirts. They make a huge difference!

Invest in a ventilated helmut like the GPA Speed Air.

I also vote for Gatorade in addition to water. For some reason protein is also key. Make sure you eat a substantial and healthy breakfast.

Take migraine medicine at the very first inkling of trouble. If you wait until you have a full blown headache at the end of the day, it's too late.

Try to condition yourself as much as possible at home. Ride extra horses, take off your stirrups and hit the gym - I just wish I had time to follow my own advice!

Hope this helps.

These are all good things - I have to have protein to keep from getting migraines. I have fought them since high school, and proper fueling is a very important way to avoid them. I am also very light sensitive, so sunglasses are a big help as well.

FWIW, I have gone back to old-school Firocet for my rescue med. It works better than any of the "fancy new" meds for me.

DarkStarrx
May. 30, 2011, 02:39 PM
I think this advice is very practical. I had no IDEA so many other migraineurs rode :) Hugs to you all.

I try to catch my HA's early, but I usually dose low. Something to consider is WHAT I've been doing. A low dose is probably worth a try if I haven't set myself up for a monster with an activity like a day at a horse show, but is laughable if I have. Heroic strengths are called for and you would THINK that would be obvious, wouldn't you? LOL


Thanks, everyone, SOOOOOOOOOO much. :)

I take Topamax daily as well, and my rescue meds are Relpax and Firocet. The narq makes me feel like a bus hit me. The night before a show I take about 50mg more of Topamax to really boost it in my system. The morning of, I pop a Relpax. This works 70% of the time. I always have that narq ready for the trailer ride home though. I had no idea so many people with terrible migraines rode!

Ski'sthelimit
May. 30, 2011, 02:43 PM
Nothing to do other then grit your teeth drink lots of water, get one of those gel things to put around your neck and ride threw it... if your not used to the hot summers give it a summer or two, always takes me two summers to get used to the southern heat... I still get panic attacks with the hot humidity + the heat of the horse steaming up to you... u just have to push threw it.

Also you definitely didnt drink enough water, i usually go threw about a gallon a day in those hot days!

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 02:48 PM
In-ter-est-ing (@ HunterMom.) Fierocet doesn't knock you straight out? Or is it just for when you need to be knocked straight out anyway? LOL. Lord knows by the time you're puking you don't need to be on a horse or at work. Depends on your definition of rescue med, I guess. I did a decade of fierocet/midrin/butalbytal etc. but imitrex does allow me to keep moving, at least until I get to the 200 mg. range. (I know, I know, but I AM under a dr's supervision and I swear I'm not the guy from Pi.) It could be worth investigating to have as a back up for when imitrex fails, which was what butalbytal was for. The neuro I have now is not particularly humane in that (or any) regard. Long story, way off topic.

Now, one other question, as I'm, ahem, une femme d'un certain age, I need some support under my breeches to smooth things out. I'm not heavyset, I'm not trying squeeze down a size or anything, I'm not cutting off my breath (!), but...I ain't goin' out there without a little...help. I don't wear my breeches skin tight, but still. It adds to the heat. Suggestions for great super cooling fabric foundations for gals who refuse the thigh cling thing?

DarkStarrx
May. 30, 2011, 03:03 PM
Firocet knocks me out in about a half hour, and within 15 I'm acting like I'm drunk. My migraines are so bad though that Firocet with Relpax is the only thing that work. Imitrex(pill, nasal, shot) worked for me for about a month and then quit. Same with Zomig, and about a million other things I tried. The Relpax no longer works as well either.

Where can one purchase the neck cooler things?

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 03:25 PM
Yeah, I had the same experience with Fioricet (and actually, I had to look back, butalbital is the same thing :p, I'd forgotten) but I found over time I got a tolerance to it too. Once at my sister's over spring break I had a 3 day or so migraine and although I never took the Fioricet more often than prescribed, I became worried that taking it for so many days might constitute an OD, so they hauled me to an ER. The ER doc gave me Tordol but he was most alarmed that nobody had given me a bunch of tests before dx'ing migraines and prescribing all this stuff, and I had to argue him out of admitting me because I didn't have insurance cards with me and so on, and promised I'd insist on getting all this done when I got home. Well, when I did, my regular drs refused to do any testing, saying (and I quote) "If you had anything serious, you'd be dead by now." Don't you love it? They really, actually said that. It would be funny, except that it's...not. "That's not the standard of care for migraine." And other associated BS. And I worked in medical later on, so I understand how standard of care works and what it is, but, c'mon, buddy. There comes a point in time when some cases are ATYPICAL enough that they're not meeting the STANDARD anyway. I eventually prevailed and got at least some of the recommended tests, but, point being, DOCTORS often don't even treat migraine like it's "a real thing." (What happens to patients who don't/can't argue and advocate for themselves? Well, actually, there have been numerous exposes about that.) And even neuros can vary very significantly in their quality of care. Ack, o/t again.

DarkStarrx
May. 30, 2011, 03:36 PM
^that happened to me as well, except I was a baby banging my head off of floor due to the pain, and the doctors kept telling my mom(a nurse) I must be autistic. Even though I never exhibited any other signs, they FINALLY about 5 years later did all sorts of tests. They still 11 years later have no idea what the cause of these suckers are(other than I only have one fully functioning sinus cavity) and just keep making these lists and lists of things I cannot do/eat/etc. The neuro went so far as to suggest that I don't ride as often.

Try again there doc...

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 04:05 PM
(@ DarkStarrx) Really!! <snort> Once I had pink eye and my pediatrician told my mom I must be allergic to my pony and I'd probably have to stop riding. (I think that was a large case of "keep coming to me, I'll tell you what you want to hear.") I'm pretty sure I remember a well-aimed kick at his privates followed (that at least partially connected) and we didn't have those suggestions to deal with any more :D.

Here's where I ordered cooling thingys: https://www.coolmedics.com/categories.php?category=Riding-Wear

I decided on a hat liner, and the most fabbo things ever: bra inserts!!! They do make a vest specifically to fit under a riding jacket, but it's fairly pricey. I'm going to try these first, because you can get away with them under your show clothes (the neck thingy you can't.) If they seem really to be effective I may go for the vest.

Across Sicily
May. 30, 2011, 04:22 PM
I am *BAD* in heat. Like I try to pass out. Not good. Showing outside in bright sunlight doesn't help matters.

I switched from showing all indoors all the time (did Morgan/Saddlebred shows, and they never really have those outside) to doing the hunter/jumper thing last year and got one heck of a shock. Last year I wore my nice mostly-cotton breeches, wool coat, non-coolmax shirts, leather gloves and a non-vented helmet.

This year I took a big plunge and made investments in what I'm hoping are going to be some key things: Coolmax (or something that acts like it) Ariat britches, Coolmax show shirts with the snap collar so I can leave the collar open until the last second and get more air, the most vented show helmet I could find (the SpeedAir), gloves with a Coolmax fabric on the top side of the hand (SSG) and one of those spiffy new soft shell jackets that are *supposed* to be very breathable and keep you cooler than their woolen counterparts. So... I am armed with a new wardrobe and am hoping that I won't die. I guess it happens to be annoyingly trendy but that wasn't my intent - my intent is staying cooler!

Outside of that, things I found that helped me a lot last year, many of which have already been suggested... for the record I'm migraine-prone as well, but generally mine can be killed if I take a painkiller before any symptoms show up. I also have a chronic pain condition so I tend to live on Advil and muscle relaxers but that's neither here nor there. Ergo, when I'm having breakfast I also down a few Advil and continue to do so throughout the day.

A tip on morning coffee, if you have it: it tends to make me a wee bit shaky, sweaty and even more jittery than I usually am at a horse show. I'm also a huge stress case, which only makes the heat worse, so I have it as quickly as I can after I wake up and then don't have any more. After that I switch to water/Gatorade.

Speaking of the stress case (no idea if that applies to you) but last year my doctor wrote me a script for beta blockers - propranalol (sp) - which is evidently good for "stage fright" type stress (which I get when going into horse shows.) I don't know if it's psychological or what but I do find when I take it I tend to stay much more cool-headed and have far better rounds, as well as not getting so overheated. It works on the heart, not the brain, so there's no brain fuzzies involved as there would be with something like Xanax.

As a side note I did try one of those cooling vests last year and while it DID work, to an extent, it looked ridiculous under a coat and made everything sopping wet anyway. I wore it schooling for a few months and then gave up. I have one of the neck things that I might try this year.

I've also heard of people dunking their heads in cold water before putting on their helmets... if you have a vented helmet it could work like a cooling vest, more or less.

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 04:47 PM
Well, thanks for the tip about the vest!!! Since it works via evaporation, I can see the problem.

StrawberryFields
May. 30, 2011, 04:58 PM
i'm copy and pasting all these suggestions into a word document :)

sonomacounty
May. 30, 2011, 05:29 PM
Oops, sorry Roo, I didn't know those didn't have to be frozen (coolmedics hat insert). Great. Thanks for the info. Quite handy they are, then.

Another migraine person here, ya'll. Try half a Fiorcet (or Esgic Plus) if it puts you to sleep.

Coolmax shirts all they way. Oh also, Tropical Rider is a super company and guess kind of riding clothes they make. Yep - they specialize in the hot & gross weather. They are online. Enduracool breeches are fabulous ! I wear them most of the year and have done so for years.

Now, the only thing I can't figure out is - is there a coolmax bra or something? I wear the cotton VS that I usually wear and that just is rather hot. Ideas on that one?

Tx

I so hate the summer.

sonomacounty
May. 30, 2011, 05:36 PM
http://www.tropicalrider.com/

Rel6
May. 30, 2011, 06:27 PM
Yeah, I had the same experience with Fioricet (and actually, I had to look back, butalbital is the same thing :p, I'd forgotten) but I found over time I got a tolerance to it too. Once at my sister's over spring break I had a 3 day or so migraine and although I never took the Fioricet more often than prescribed, I became worried that taking it for so many days might constitute an OD, so they hauled me to an ER. The ER doc gave me Tordol but he was most alarmed that nobody had given me a bunch of tests before dx'ing migraines and prescribing all this stuff, and I had to argue him out of admitting me because I didn't have insurance cards with me and so on, and promised I'd insist on getting all this done when I got home. Well, when I did, my regular drs refused to do any testing, saying (and I quote) "If you had anything serious, you'd be dead by now." Don't you love it? They really, actually said that. It would be funny, except that it's...not. "That's not the standard of care for migraine." And other associated BS. And I worked in medical later on, so I understand how standard of care works and what it is, but, c'mon, buddy. There comes a point in time when some cases are ATYPICAL enough that they're not meeting the STANDARD anyway. I eventually prevailed and got at least some of the recommended tests, but, point being, DOCTORS often don't even treat migraine like it's "a real thing." (What happens to patients who don't/can't argue and advocate for themselves? Well, actually, there have been numerous exposes about that.) And even neuros can vary very significantly in their quality of care. Ack, o/t again.

Ugh, this! I started getting bad headaches when I was about 8 or 9, doc said it couldn't be migraines because I would be crying and carrying on more. No, stupid, I just got use to frequent migraines.

Finally went to a neurologist a year ago (I'm 19 now btw, so you can see how long to it took me) who I see anyway for my ADHD (although I don't take meds for it) and I said I've been getting really bad migraines and he prescribed treximet and said tell me how this works. So basically, I am self diagnosed...I informed the neuro I have migraines. Nauseous, sensitivity to light and sound, pain on one or both sides. Ugh.

But this board has convinced me to make an appointment and go back and talk to him more. I though that muscle cramps and nausea was just the price of no headache, but it seems like there could be better options for me out there.

mortebella
May. 30, 2011, 06:47 PM
Good for you, Rel6! In my experience, it is very, very hard to get good care for migraines. I even had a neuro in the next town who was a migraineur himself; you would think that would be a leg up, huh? But no, what worked for him must SURELY work for me; I must just not be giving it a chance. And his office staff was a disaster. The dosage I needed wasn't made by the manufacturer, so I needed TWO prescriptions written out; I would unfailingly go through this routine days in advance EVERY time, and do you think they EVER got it right? But I haven't heard of the muscle cramps as a side effect except as an interaction w/ another med, so that seems like something you might want to check out, and if your doc blows it off, I would keep pursuing it. I know as an interaction, it's serious, so until you really know otherwise...erring on the side of caution might be wise, and worth the hassle. Best of luck with finding a solution.

Well, a little research and I stand corrected: muscle cramps ARE a side effect of the triptans (imitrex, relpax, maxalt, zomig, etc.) Just not one I'd experienced and consequently blotted from memory. So don't listen to alarmist me! Still doesn't mean a better option isn't worth the investment :)

Rel6
May. 30, 2011, 08:58 PM
Good for you, Rel6! In my experience, it is very, very hard to get good care for migraines. I even had a neuro in the next town who was a migraineur himself; you would think that would be a leg up, huh? But no, what worked for him must SURELY work for me; I must just not be giving it a chance. And his office staff was a disaster. The dosage I needed wasn't made by the manufacturer, so I needed TWO prescriptions written out; I would unfailingly go through this routine days in advance EVERY time, and do you think they EVER got it right? But I haven't heard of the muscle cramps as a side effect except as an interaction w/ another med, so that seems like something you might want to check out, and if your doc blows it off, I would keep pursuing it. I know as an interaction, it's serious, so until you really know otherwise...erring on the side of caution might be wise, and worth the hassle. Best of luck with finding a solution.

Well, a little research and I stand corrected: muscle cramps ARE a side effect of the triptans (imitrex, relpax, maxalt, zomig, etc.) Just not one I'd experienced and consequently blotted from memory. So don't listen to alarmist me! Still doesn't mean a better option isn't worth the investment :)

Yea, I definitely plan on following up! My neurologist is someone I've been with for a while (I've gone through about ADHD med there is lol) and is really one of the best in the area and has been very willing to listen and try different things for the ADHD. I'm not currently on anything at all so it couldn't be an interaction.

mortebella
Jun. 9, 2011, 09:43 PM
An update: my cool medics hat liner got here (and the bra inserts!) AND...I thought they were a complete flop. Just did not work for me at all. One thing to note about the hat liner is that it's THICK. Think really heavy duty pot holder. Without a doubt it won't fit in a non-adjustable helmet if it's snug. I had concerns about it working with a non-ventilated helmet anyway, but my schooling helmet IS ventilated. NO benefit whatsoever. The bra inserts were like having a wet rag stuffed in there. And not a cool wet rag. Just wet. And gross.

Now, here's why I'm really letting you know this (it's not that I just like talking about my underwear ;) ) When you look at the site, there's a part called returns. If you're in an excited state of mind (reading the stuff about how it's supposed to work and how in tests it stays 20 degrees cooler than what's around it, etc.) it's possible to skim the "100% comitment to your satisfaction and exchange, replace, or refund any product" statement and go BOOM!!! I'm in. Weeeeeeeeell, little darlin's, be wiser from my mistake. It's possible these products might work for you, because I believe they must work for the COTHers who recommended them. But once you find out whether or no, IT'S TOO LATE, because they won't take them back IF THEY'VE BEEN WET. That's right, once you've investigated the hype, they've got your money, because (had I read on) "they can no longer be sold as new." I guess I've just gotten too used to Dover.

TrakeGirl
Jun. 10, 2011, 07:53 AM
Thought I would do a shout out for the cooling vest from VTO. Bought it with the 20% Memorial Day sale.

Wore it for the first time tacking the other night - it was still 90 degrees at 8pm. I loved it. Thought it made a big difference.

Came with a free neck wrap too - haven't tried that yet.

Addison
Jun. 10, 2011, 08:38 AM
It is difficult to make decisions once your condition progresses to heat exhaustion. Once you feel that bad, it is hard to think at all.

Staying well hydrated is vital but i think some temperature/humidity combinations will still get the best of many riders.

Fioricet is my drug of choice for headache pain as well. Imitrex has not helped me at all.

I know this sounds odd, but eating an Italian ice or shaved ice treat after riding in hot, hot weather helps to resolve my heat induced headaches. I try to induce "brain freeze" but the sensation is one of pain relief instead.??!

mortebella
Jun. 10, 2011, 03:21 PM
Still another update, and a big YAY for CoolMedics customer service this time: I wrote them about my problem and they agree to send me a refund. So they win my applause on this round!

AppendixQHLover
Jun. 10, 2011, 03:29 PM
Drink, Pee, No IV.

That is the chant we used to do on long distance bike rides. Lots of water. Alternate between water and gatorade. Mostly because you need those electrolytes.

Stay away from soda. I see so many kids at shows drinking nothing but juice and soda. They end up in the a/c show office bathroom on the floor with heat exhaustion.

IF you have a stall bring two fans. One for the horse, and one for you. I will sit in front of the fan out of the sun.

Take your boots and coat off asap.

Don't forget sunscreen. I am very fair and burn quickly. Burns make you dehydrated.

I don't ride if the heat index is over 100 only because I have asthma and the heat index over 100 flares it up pretty bad. I will have a harder time with that than the actual heat.

hijumpin1
Jun. 10, 2011, 04:32 PM
Great suggestions from everybody. I take a cooler to the show. The night before, I will put some gatorade and bottles of water, etc in the freezer. Let them freeze solid. I also freeze a helmet pad or two. When your about ready for your cold drinks, let them thaw out as needed. I will put the ice pack up under my helmet, and put one in my breech pocket. They won't stay cold long, but any little bit helps. I try to keep my coat off as long as I can. If it's really bad, I won't wear it.

crazyhorses
Jun. 10, 2011, 04:46 PM
I get heat exhaustion really easily. Like REALLY easily. The main thing I've noticed that causes me problems is my helmet. I have a CO GR8 and it has no vents. Thus, my head gets really heated. Since the head and feet are the primary spots for heat to escape, that is where my problem is. So I ended up buying one of those awful Troxel Spirits but it keeps my head SO much cooler than my CO (plus if I fall off, it's not like 300 dollars down the drain like it would be for my CO lol).

I too found the Cool Medics didn't work very well. Which really sucks because I really need them.

Like some else mentioned, bring extra shows at shows. I bring light tennis shoes. And the show socks always help because they're so light.

And also, NO juice. I made that mistake once and threw up everywhere (heh, trail ride luckily) and then almost fainted. ONCE you GET to heat exhaustion the most important thing is to balance your electrolytes. I do this by drinking a Gatorade (plus the carbs help) and then drinking more water.

ParadoxFarm
Jun. 10, 2011, 05:09 PM
Great reminders everyone. I had a lesson yesterday morning (TN heat...it's been unseasonaby hot here this spring.) I FORGOT my water. How stupid. Luckily my trainer is prepared and she brought out some water for me. This was the first lessons that I actually had to drink several times during my lesson. Usually I just ride and hydrate afterward. Don't do that. Drink DURING your lesson. It did help. Guess I owe my trainer a six pack of water! :) Oh, and I'll start bringing Gatorade, too.

TheJenners
Jun. 10, 2011, 06:01 PM
While I no longer have to deal with this, when I lived in the South I always froze my waters. I rarely drank sports drinks, maybe one to every three waters? I aimed for about four or more liters of water if I was outside all day, and even then I'd go all day without peeing, and then pee something the color of strong tea at night.

Hose your horse down before you ride.

Don't lolly in the ring. Go in, ride, get out. Sand arenas especially, as the sand throws the sun and heat back. Don't walk around cooling the horse down, because you aren't. Either go on a trail ride/ride in a pasture/hand walk somewhere else if the horse is still huffing, or go in the barn and hose his chest while he huffs. I have YET to have a horse suffer any ill effects of that, but I have had lesson students who wanted to keep riding to "cool Dobbin down, please?" who promptly got the whoopsies. I think it's a combination of the walking not creating its own breeze like trotting, etc, and the heat and sun settling on them.

Avoid porta-potties at shows. They are OVENS. The only time I had a heat exhaustion incident was in a porta-potty. Went in to pee, hot and still, and after fighting trying to get breeches back on for about five minutes, I was done. I had to get help with the breeches and then had to sit in the car with the AC on. And I was an adult, very embarrassing.

Addison
Jun. 10, 2011, 06:07 PM
TrakeGirl...please post your thoughts about the cooling vest once you try it. I would love to find something to help make this heat more bearable.

mojo7777
Jun. 10, 2011, 09:28 PM
I have the migraine problem too, but wimp out by only riding in the very early morning. No shows for me for this reason (and for others, honestly, like time and $$). I've learned to love the riding time by myself in the very early summer mornings. Then horsey goes into his stall with fan and I go home or to work in the A/C! But I feel for those of you who show.

Carol Ames
Jun. 10, 2011, 10:09 PM
put a wet washcloth into a baggy and frezeovernight; the goal now is to survive:yes:; take granola bars with you to munch on between classes and drink lots of water be sure you're parked near a port:winkgrin:ajon:lol: and drink more water than you would ever consider normally:o; one of my students went along with me one day and every time I came back to the trailer she shoved a bottle of water in my hands and said "here, drink this; : I did:yes:; more than I thought I ever could:eek: and still function, 64 ounces; I did feel much better in the after noon; I think it's important to curb our ambitions; in this heat; I regret now that I showed both jumpers in heat like this; there was a cold hose to stand them under after a class; that a scraper and a fan are probably the best we can do;My next trailer had fans in it, small but, fans and white reflective FRP sides; once I figured out which way the breeze was blowing;) I could open the windows accordingly; I always parked under a tree:yes: , in:cool: the shade.

RoyalTRider
Jun. 11, 2011, 12:06 AM
Another one with chronic migraines here, and nothing feels worse than a migraine triggered by heat exhaustion! It gives me all the more incentive to take care of my body the best way I can in the heat.

I recommend taking an icy cold cold towel and resting it on your neck, wringing it out slowly while its resting there. You can get a tiny cooler and a large washcloth and keep the cloth in the cooler with plenty of cold water and ice. When I worked with high-performance athletes, this was our medical team's first line of defense on hot days to keep heat problems from worsening.

TrakeGirl
Jun. 11, 2011, 06:36 AM
TrakeGirl...please post your thoughts about the cooling vest once you try it. I would love to find something to help make this heat more bearable.

Here is my take on the cooling vest - okay, you wet this thing down for 1-2 minutes. It becomes HEAVY. AND COLD. You supposedly wring it out and wipe off external water - and you aren't supposed to get wet when you put it on.

1. It isn't that heavy once you have it on.
2. You WILL be wet underneath (avoid white T shirts).

I wore it to hack when it was 94, 10000% humidity. I stayed pretty comfortable. Like always felt there was a bit of a breeze that would cool me when I was walking/trotting/cantering - from the air moving and the evaporation of the vest. I would wear it again - definitely didn't hurt, I certainly wasn't any hotter than I would have been and I do feel I was cooler. I got the v cut one so I could have the option to wear under a show coat, but not sure I go that route (might look a little bulky). But I could see me warming up in it (and getting my show shirt nice and wet and cool) then taking it off and putting on show coat for the ring.

I might find a way to keep the neck cooler on IN the ring - that was nice as well, although the free one that came with it looks a little like a boy scout scarf and I think the fashion status of it is ridiculously ugly. :) I also ripped the enormous white tag off the front of the vest announcing its cooling properties so it looks fairly normal on.

Have a show in a few weeks so that will be the real test - despite how hydrated I stay, I am one that usually gets attacked by wooziness at least once during a division when I am in 90+ degree heat. Sometimes I can manage by chugging cold beverages, sometimes I have to pop off and put my head between my knees for a sec...if these products help to avoid that, I'm sold! Will report back.

Chall
Jun. 11, 2011, 07:33 AM
Who ever mentioned putting ice against the throat, I have an emergency cool down by buying a cold drink and holding it against my heart. Got caught in a quarter mile long parking lot in the California sun looking for my car and thought I might pass out (and never be found). That cold drink unopened against my heart really helped.

Beethoven
Jun. 11, 2011, 08:01 AM
Living and working at a barn in FL has taught me lots of things. The most important thing is to drink water! I do mix in gatorades as well, the G2, the less sugary ones.

I too am a migraine getter. I have avoided the neurologist this far because I hate doctors. I have also figured out how to treat mine when I feel them coming on. Heat is definitely a factor. Sunglasses are key and so is drinking water and eating something even when you are so hot you don't feel hungry.

I have found holding hold drinks next to my wrist really cools me down!

Thankfully, we have A/C at the barn. In the summer when its really hot, I am not afraid to go take a little break in the A/C or just sit in the shade in the barn in front of a fan. Its important to let your body cool down when you get to that feeling that you need to sit down and drink. I have learned to listen because if I don't then I am screwed.

For my migraines, I take 2 excedrin migraine and 4 advil and that seems get them. If I take them too late, it just masks some of the pain but my body still feel like it has the migraine if you know what I mean.

I really should of see someone about them, but I am a weenie.

Addison
Jun. 11, 2011, 08:14 AM
TrakeGirl thanks for the update. I just ordered a vest and hope it helps me too.

mortebella
Jun. 11, 2011, 08:44 AM
Good luck guys with the vests! I soooo wish their products had worked for me, but at least they were good with the refund!

Hunter Mom
Jun. 12, 2011, 12:17 AM
In-ter-est-ing (@ HunterMom.) Fierocet doesn't knock you straight out? Or is it just for when you need to be knocked straight out anyway? LOL. Lord knows by the time you're puking you don't need to be on a horse or at work. Depends on your definition of rescue med, I guess. I did a decade of fierocet/midrin/butalbytal etc. but imitrex does allow me to keep moving, at least until I get to the 200 mg. range. (I know, I know, but I AM under a dr's supervision and I swear I'm not the guy from Pi.) It could be worth investigating to have as a back up for when imitrex fails, which was what butalbytal was for. The neuro I have now is not particularly humane in that (or any) regard. Long story, way off topic.

Now, one other question, as I'm, ahem, une femme d'un certain age, I need some support under my breeches to smooth things out. I'm not heavyset, I'm not trying squeeze down a size or anything, I'm not cutting off my breath (!), but...I ain't goin' out there without a little...help. I don't wear my breeches skin tight, but still. It adds to the heat. Suggestions for great super cooling fabric foundations for gals who refuse the thigh cling thing?

Actually, fiorocet doesn't knock me loopy. Midrin sure did but this doesn't. Maybe because it works faster and so I don't take as much. I have taken all sorts of stuffover the years, and the key to all is catching it early.

Oh, and I skip the smartslims when it's hot. I sweat like a pig anyhow. Hoping my new show helmet (happy helmet awareness day!) keeps me as cool as my schooling hat.

imissvixen
Jun. 12, 2011, 07:25 AM
Heat exhaustion will eventually lead to brain damage and potentially death so you want to be cautious. I used to run on the track when the Duke football team practiced in the midsummer NC heat. The first thing they did when it looked like a player was getting overheated was to make them plunge their hands and forearms into a cooler full of watery ice. Apparently that is a fairly standard sports practice.

FlightCheck
Jun. 12, 2011, 12:26 PM
We also keep a container of baby wipes in the cooler, and bring them ringside for quick "cooling breaks" for the rider's face, neck, etc. Sometimes just wiping the dirt and sweat off is a GREAT relief!

At home in the tackroom we have a huge jar of individual water flavorings, like Propel, gatorade, crystal light, etc - for those who "don't like water".