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Reddfox
May. 26, 2011, 10:13 AM
As the days get hotter, I'm finding that I have less tolerance for the heat than ever before. I've had heat stroke in the past (from my running cross country days) and I know that affects the body's internal temperature regulation and you are more susceptible to the heat. 2 lessons in a row I've come close to heat exhaustion without realizing that I was overheating.

I ride my own horses in the morning to avoid the heat, however, when I take lessons - they are normally around 4:30pm - about the hottest part of the day. I do wear a helmet - which is not helping the overheating...however, I'm a helmet every ride type of girl so I need to find a way to beat the heat with my helmet.

I drink a LOT before my lessons and I have resorted to stopping and drinking during my lessons as well - but it interrupts the flow if I have to do that too much.

Have any of you tried any of the CoolMedics products or does anyone have advice on how to beat the heat when you HAVE to ride in the heat of the day?

Thanks!

netg
May. 26, 2011, 10:26 AM
I had heat stroke as a teen, so am aware how that can affect you. As an adult I got close to overheating too much once, and the horse I was on stopped and refused to move because something felt "off" in how I was riding.


You should make sure your instructor knows your problems, and ask for help remembering to drink each time you take a stretchy break for the horse or are getting explanations of something. An instructor obviously wants his/her students to stay healthy and on the horse's back, so I'm sure when you ask for help you can get it. We have cooling neck wraps for sale everywhere around here, especially in hiking/camping type stores. This blog (http://salihan.com/2009/cooling-neck-wraps/)gives an example of how you could make your own if you're more talented than I am. They work wonderfully, and I highly recommend them if needed!

Cool Medics has a neck cooler which looks like it would work well. If your helmet isn't ventilated, you would do yourself a favor to get one which is. I use one of the ugly plastic Tipperary helmets with the bike helmet look. I wet my hair before putting the helmet on (it's dry here, so my hair dries quickly even if I'm sweating, too!), and get some cooling from that.

Good luck, and good job being proactive about taking care of yourself!

xQHDQ
May. 26, 2011, 10:29 AM
Last year both me and my horse had trouble with the heat. For me, I found wetting my hair really helped. I hose down the horse's belly before getting on and my head before putting on my helmet. It gives a whole new meaning to hat head, but it's better than passing out.

Mudroom
May. 26, 2011, 10:30 AM
Also get some electrolytes for you too, not just your horse.

leilatigress
May. 26, 2011, 10:32 AM
Frozen veggie in the bra are an excellent and cheap way to beat the heat. Depending on your humidity and just how hot it's gonna get that works for There is a thread on how to beat the heat around here somewhere.

Reddfox
May. 26, 2011, 11:04 AM
I had heat stroke as a teen, so am aware how that can affect you. As an adult I got close to overheating too much once, and the horse I was on stopped and refused to move because something felt "off" in how I was riding.


You should make sure your instructor knows your problems, and ask for help remembering to drink each time you take a stretchy break for the horse or are getting explanations of something. An instructor obviously wants his/her students to stay healthy and on the horse's back, so I'm sure when you ask for help you can get it.


Thanks for the suggestions all - I'll search for any previous threads on beating the heat too.

My instructor knows that I'm having issues with the heat and actually reminds me to drink or brings my water out to me. I hate feeling like I'm interrupting the flow of the lesson.

The horses know too - they stop when they feel me getting weak. :)

I've started drinking gatorade instead of water - hoping that helps - my helmet is ventilated, but not as well as some. I'll look at some options there.

purplnurpl
May. 26, 2011, 11:04 AM
I have issues with the heat as well.
I'm in TX.

when it comes down to it....I just can't ride at 4:30PM. it's not safe.

I ride in the AM or after dark under the lights.

I had to buy one of those stupid looking vented cheapo helmets in WHITE.
stupid helmet:
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p189/xckaboom/abby2.jpg
I also put a bandana on my head to soak up sweat otherwise I sweat so much it burns my eyes.

I make sure the hose is out BEFORE I get on and when I hop off I start hosing myself and the horse (still tacked) right away. I strip down to my sports bra, roll my breaches up and put on flip flops. Taking my paddock boots and socks off is a HUGE heat release for me.

After the first hose I strip the saddle and throw it somewhere quickly...usually my bench which is close to the barn. And do the 2nd hosing with bridle still on.
Then I strip the bridle and continue.

xQHDQ
May. 26, 2011, 06:53 PM
I hate feeling like I'm interrupting the flow of the lesson.

You're not. The lesson is for YOU. Do what YOU NEED TO DO. Period. You're instructor wants you to enjoy riding. If you get heatstroke, you will NOT be having fun. If she's stopping you herself, that should tell you she's not bothered. And...I'm sure you're not the only person she teaches who has to take a break, whether it's for the heat or because their legs get tired.

Pony Fixer
May. 26, 2011, 07:27 PM
I have a cool medics vest and the helmet cooler--the vest is heavy but works well, even in the humidity here. The helmet liner works well, too.

meupatdoes
May. 26, 2011, 09:23 PM
I was talking to some endurance riders a year ago. They use these special vests that you soak in a tub of water and then wear. It keeps the vests amazingly cool and it keeps them cool. One of the gals said she will wrap the vest around her horse's neck to help the horse cool down quickly too and it works to bring the horse's pulse down, something that is really important during an endurance race.

I put one on. The temperature that day was 35 degrees Celsius (high 90s in Fahrenheit) and it was so cool it was almost a shock putting it on. In fact, I even got a little cold because I wasn't moving.

I cannot, for the life of me, remember what those vests were called. Maybe you could google it.

If it is THAT effective I would almost be scared to use it.

Rider can go go go like it's 65 degrees and meanwhile it's still 105 with the heat index for the horse.

GingerJumper
May. 26, 2011, 09:34 PM
I don't have a hard time in the heat myself, but I've got many friends who LOVE the Coolmedics line and I've heard great things about them. Plus, when coats are waived, you can wear one of their vests in black and look spiffy and stay cool ;)

Also, one thing to stay away from:
Kerrits also makes these arm cooler things that they sent me to try... Hated 'em. The only cooling sensation I got was from the "heat chills" I get when I'm overheating, lol.

Opus1
May. 26, 2011, 09:49 PM
Whew. 4:30 p.m. is tough. I just rescheduled my 2 p.m. lessons to 10 a.m. because of the heat in N. Fla. I've already almost had a falling out this year (heat+antibiotics), so I've been experimenting with different things.

-- I drink water on my way to the lesson. Then gulp a little Gatorade while tacking up/grooming. Take a bottle of water with me out to the ring that my instructor gives to me during breaks. Then as soon as I get my horse in the crossties, I'll then down about 1/2 a (medium) bottle of Gatorade and continue to drink water until I'm back home. Even when it's 90-95 outside with high humidity, that seems to do the trick for me.

-- A cooler helmet. Good god, I've got to get one myself, but my head stays way too hot during lessons and I can tell as soon as I take mine off, my entire body feels relieved.

-- Tech fabrics. I picked up a Nike Coolmax(?) t-shirt from Ross for about $10. I also picked up some Nike compression shorts to use under my breeches that helps with sweating and circulates air very well. Oh, and switching to tights instead of breeches might be a good idea. At the moment, I'm trying to eliminate cotton entirely from my lesson clothing.

-- Wear a bandana around your wrist. When it starts to warm up, douse it with water and tie it around your neck. Hell, take off your helmet for a second and pour some water over your head. (Or you could buy one of those fancy cooling things. :D )

Good luck. I'm not sure where you're from, but it feels like it's going to be a doozy of a summer down here.

J-Lu
May. 26, 2011, 10:45 PM
You're not. The lesson is for YOU. Do what YOU NEED TO DO. Period. You're instructor wants you to enjoy riding. If you get heatstroke, you will NOT be having fun. If she's stopping you herself, that should tell you she's not bothered. And...I'm sure you're not the only person she teaches who has to take a break, whether it's for the heat or because their legs get tired.

This plus Opus1's post.

I used to live in Houston and I'd have died if I didn't have gatorade or a gatoraide/water mix on the rail for water breaks. Some gals kept theirs on the rail in an ice cooler. Electrolytes, electrolytes, electrolytes!

Your horse gets many breaks in hot weather, no? Why aren't these your breaks as well? Drinking fluids is not breaking the flow of the lesson!!! Falling off from heat stroke is!!! :)

GimmeQs
May. 26, 2011, 11:09 PM
I just tried my new-to-me white coolmedics vest today. However it's for showing and I didn't have a sparkling clean container to dunk it in and stay white. So I tried quickly hosing it down - didn't work so well as it seemed to repel the water! Anyways, I rode in it half-way wet and it still worked pretty well!

mtngirl
May. 27, 2011, 02:57 AM
Been there, done that and have learned the hard, hard, hard way that rescheduling the lesson to another part of the day is definitely the best thing.

Having said that: If I do need to ride in the heat I do use a Cool Medics vest...I keep mine soaked in cold water and in the cooler until I need to put it on and will often use the necktie as well. I have a white vented helmet, wear moisture wicking breeches and shirts and take frequent breaks. Moisture wicking golf shirts are available at Wal-mart for under $15. Definitely worth the money.

When you take a break, if at all possible, get in the shade out of direct sun. Believe me, even a couple of minutes can make a big difference.

Just another hint...blood gets O2 in the lungs...I find that keeping a towel in ice/ice water and when I take a break, wiping my face and putting the towel up to my face so that I breath the hot air thru the cold towel (obviously not a thick towel...I use like a thin, kitchen towel) helps me a lot! It really helps me and I just seem to think better. As soon as I finish riding, I'm hosing myself down at the same time I do my horse. I then immediately dry off and change into something cool, like shorts etc.

I used one of the Cool Medics in a helmet for quite awhile, but the new one I got plumped up too big and my helmet doesn't fit with it, so I just douse my head in water instead.

As for drinking a lot of fluids before riding, remember that dehydration usually starts long before that...you may actually be headed in that direction a day or two before and the heat and exertions of the lesson drive you over the limit. Start drinking more fluids the day before or more.

I feel for you. I've had heat exhaustion several times and each succesive one gets worse. The last time put me in the hospital and left me sick and with muscle cramps for days.

Good luck. I hope the suggestions help you.

buck22
May. 27, 2011, 06:44 AM
If it is THAT effective I would almost be scared to use it.

Rider can go go go like it's 65 degrees and meanwhile it's still 105 with the heat index for the horse.
actually yes I have found that to be the case

I have an cool medics vest I bought second hand off ebay last year. Though mine will dampen my clothes, and it makes me look like a crossing guard, it does work very well.

So well in fact, the few times last year I used it I had to continually remind myself throughout the day to not grab my horse and go ride/drive him. I went through my day merrily be-bopping around in my own little comfortable temperature bubble while the rest of the world around me suffered.

Especially now that my horse is retired from riding to driving, I could easily push my horse on a day that is way too hot for him while I'm sitting comfortably.

GimmeQs
May. 27, 2011, 09:19 AM
Not to hijack but due to great praise for the vests here, maybe youll be getting one so....

The Coolmedics site says NOT to soak them for longer then 10 seconds! or you risk damaging the fibers. Yet it sounds like lots of people let them soak for hours. Anyone ruin theirs??

Also, I'm not above walking around shows with ice packs under my arms and when really hot, hiding in the trailer with them down my pants too! Cold on major arteries= cooler blood= cooler person!

analise
May. 27, 2011, 09:33 AM
Don't know how well it would work for riding but I know there are ladies at the renaissance faires who use "bodice chillers". Basically a metal cigar tube filled with ice chips that go between "the girls". Would probably work just as well inside a sports bra.

Just a thought, I've never tried it.

quietann
May. 27, 2011, 09:55 AM
Many good suggestions here! It's definitely time to get up early to ride.

I am a huge fan of Gatorade G2 (the reduced calorie one) and sometimes mix in a little bit of electrolyte powder. The quart bottle goes to the arena with me and whenever I feel the slightest bit "off" I go take a swig or three. In really hot weather I'll drink a whole quart before I ever get on, and go through 2 bottles after that. They also make a powder to mix into water in a bottle, but for some reason the premixed stuff just seems to work better. (My horse likes it, too :)

I am becoming more and more a believer in tech fabrics, especially for shirts. I wear Equissentials lightweight summer "Grip Bums" tights and though they are cotton/Lycra, and black, they are light enough that I don't get too heated from them.

I also wear the Tipperary 8500 helmet, which is well-ventilated, and crochet-back gloves... and here's the odd thing, thin wool sock liners under whatever socks I am wearing. That *should* make my feet hot, but doesn't for some reason.

analise
May. 27, 2011, 10:07 AM
Probably the sock liners soak up your sweat, keeping your feet dry.

emeraldsilver
May. 27, 2011, 10:16 AM
I used to work summer camp for my instructor - 7am to 2pm, Monday through Friday, June and July. In Texas. If I got to ride at all, it was between 12 and 2.

Things that worked really, really well for me:

- Lots of water, as others have said. I didn't (and still often don't) even bother with things as small as a Gatorade bottle - I've got one of the gallon water jugs (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-1-Gallon-Jug-Red/13848699) that I fill halfway with ice and the rest with water. A few hours at the barn, and I usually finish it off before the ice has completely melted. It's a little unwieldy to drink out of on horseback, but I usually left the jug with my instructor and she'd hand it up and hold my horse while I drank.

- French braided hair. It can do odd things in terms of helmet comfort, but it does seem to let more air in. I've never mastered doing the neat, tidy French braid where the braid looks like it's on top of the rest of the hair, so I tend to have lots of extra venting this way because half the hair is standing away from my head.

- Wet bandanna on my head, under the helmet. Yes, it gets the inside of the helmet wet. Yes, it's probably not great for the padding. No, I don't really care. I don't own any $100 helmets, and leaving it out in the sun for 10 minutes dries it out anyway.

- Helmet is usually a vented Troxel, although I'm not as picky about having a white one.

- As soon as I get off the horse, I take off the helmet and bandanna and replace them with a soaking wet baseball cap. If I'm particularly hot at the time, I'll just dunk the hat in whatever trough or bucket I'm offering the horse a drink out of. The key here is the soaking wet part - don't wring it out at all, just dunk it and slap it on your head. If it's a trough in the sun, make sure you stick it way down in there; even in 100 degree weather, the bottom of the trough tends to be relatively cool. (Bottom of the trough cool water also works well for I'm-going-to-kill-that-mare-when-this-stops-hurting fresh blisters, as long as they don't have broken skin... That was a great summer.)

emeraldsilver
May. 27, 2011, 10:21 AM
Don't know how well it would work for riding but I know there are ladies at the renaissance faires who use "bodice chillers". Basically a metal cigar tube filled with ice chips that go between "the girls". Would probably work just as well inside a sports bra.

Just a thought, I've never tried it.

They're really great for the first half hour or so, but there's only so much ice you can fit in there. After a while, it's just a tube full of lukewarm water.

I'd be worried about it flying out mid-ride... They only really seem stay in place through the magic of firmly supported cleavage.

analise
May. 27, 2011, 10:53 AM
Hah, I've never used them, just know a bunch of folks recommend them for faire. I imagine they refill them pretty often though, that's a point I didn't think of!

esdressage
May. 27, 2011, 11:15 AM
I really do think that if it's too hot for you to go out there and be riding without a lot of cooling gear, you need to be super-careful with your horse, too. Last summer when I rode on a particularly hot day, my mare colicked (mildly) afterwards even though I took good care to cool her off well after the ride. It made me feel pretty terrible.

Can you schedule your lessons for very early? I have mine scheduled for 7am right now because I'm also in a hot climate and I don't even think I'd be able to get much out of the lesson in 100+ degree heat and glaring sun.

All that said, there have been some good suggestions on here :)

eventer_mi
May. 27, 2011, 11:19 AM
I have a CoolMedics vest and I don't find that it works at all. Maybe for the first few minutes while it's still cold, then, nothing but a damp layer on top of your shirt. Of course, it's humid as the tropics down here (NC), so that's probably why it doesn't work.

butlerfamilyzoo
May. 27, 2011, 12:12 PM
Well i'm in GA and i have a knock off cool medics vest, the neck tie, and the helmet liners.

While i dont find it a miracle cure to the heat... I do find it keeps me 5-10 degrees cooler on those body parts i have it. I used the vest to mow the front 7 acres last year and could make it with minimal stopping for potty breaks.

I think my knock off says to soak it for 5min. The secret is to have a couple of them. Soak one and then throw it in the fridge. Alternate them in the fridge all day to keep you cooler.

I've found they ONLY help if i wear a tech fabric shirt under it. If i wear a cotton T under it, it just soaks up water and retains heat. But with a sports top that wicks the moisture off and dries quick, it will keep me cooler. The cool medics type vests WILL make you wet. So keep that in mind if you've got a pair of white breeches that are gonna be a bit see through when damp. Depending on how far your vest comes down, you may be showing a bit more of your rear end than you wanted to... ;)

I've had a harder time keeping my son cool. He's 2. I use the helmet liner and the neck tie for him, but the vests dont come small enough for him yet and the small kids helmets are not well vented, actually i dont think his is at all.

To keep your horses cooler in the warmer months, body clip them. This prevents the sweat from keeping the hair down on the skin, making it insulate and trap in heat, vs allowing the horse to puff the coat up a tad to allow better air flow. It works very well for mine.

Also remember, when everyone is hosing their horses after rides, unless you keep the hose on them until they are fully cool or park them in front of a fan, you are actually smashing the hair down everywhere and making the hair trap in their body heat. I used to hose, scrape it off, then throw them out in the paddock to roll and get the itchies out... But i had one colic once and my vet informed me of how i was really trapping the heat in by hosing and putting my horses back out in the heat.

Be wary of drinking too much water, you can actually flush out all your electrolytes. I make up half and half bottles of water/gatorade. It's kinda blah, but it helps. Problem for me is i drink that much, i have to stop and pee 800 times a day. So i tend to just not drink and then overheat and pass out... I have to remind myself to keep drinking all day.

With the temps we've seen already, i am sure dreading the summer. I think i'm ready to move up to Alaska.

Fillabeana
May. 27, 2011, 01:27 PM
The trick to the Gatorade powder is to make it up a day before, and put it in the fridge overnight. I don't know why the powder tastes different than the 'ready-made', but making it ahead fixes that problem.

White, vented helmet. My hair is dark, and my head gets HOT if I'm not wearing a hat, so I have several light-colored hats, in addition to my homely white vented Troxel.
Light-colored, long-sleeved, not-cotton shirt. The sun on your arms can heat you a lot. You'd think that more clothes would make you hotter, but light/white shirts are the best thing to wear in the sunny heat.
A sports-bra that doesn't overheat you. The ones that work, if your 'ladies are large', tend to be pretty stout and thick, with lots of elastic and extra material, and can really trap body heat.
If you can ride in lessons with short paddock boots, without having the stirrups pinch you, do. The black half-chaps or tall boots are HOT.

Have your instructor hand you gatorade to drink, and water to pour over your hair or wet some of your clothing, during 'drink breaks'. And reschedule if you possibly can to a cooler time of day.

And to cool off your horse, hose/scrape/repeat. You want to remove the water on him that is warm, and replace it with cool, and repeat every time the water gets warm.

In hot weather, instead of brushing the horse, I just wash him off, and scrape the excess. If your saddle pad is clean, it won't bother anything to have his hair damp under the pad, and he will not have any dirt to chafe him.

lovey1121
May. 27, 2011, 01:53 PM
:lol:
Frozen veggie in the bra are an excellent and cheap way to beat the heat. Depending on your humidity and just how hot it's gonna get that works for There is a thread on how to beat the heat around here somewhere.

Oh my what a visual - niblet titties

leilatigress
May. 27, 2011, 02:22 PM
It works! You can also do that with the fruit and then make a smoothie out of them when they become defrosted with a scoop of frozen yogurt. I'm in Texas and in the Southern tropical heat of it so veggies, fruit, frozen bandanas and brims on the helmet and a cowboy hat otherwise to keep cool.

GimmeQs
May. 27, 2011, 07:28 PM
I just saw the Kerrit's Ice Fil Sleeves on VTO's site. Anybody try these???

Janet
May. 27, 2011, 08:19 PM
Gatorade and water, starting well ahead of time. If it is going to be very hot, start at breakfast.

Wet bandana under the ventilated helmet.

An old towel, cut in half lengthwise, and soaked in ice water, tied around the neck.

Opus1
May. 27, 2011, 08:51 PM
... frozen bandanas ...

Ah! I'd forgotten that trick. I do this during mid-summer so I can fall asleep at night (No AC). Except I do it with washcloths. VERY effective. You could freeze several and throw them in a cooler with some ice. Or just douse them in ice water.

Petstorejunkie
May. 27, 2011, 09:39 PM
Please please please remember that if YOU are that close to overheating, so is your horse.

For staying cool, the workout clothes specially designed to help keep you cool helps, as does soaking your head before plopping it into your helmet.

I would make moving your lesson to later in the evening a top priority. No one should be riding when it's above 90*...

Reddfox
May. 27, 2011, 10:27 PM
Please please please remember that if YOU are that close to overheating, so is your horse.

For staying cool, the workout clothes specially designed to help keep you cool helps, as does soaking your head before plopping it into your helmet.

I would make moving your lesson to later in the evening a top priority. No one should be riding when it's above 90*...

Just for clarification, I don't ride when it's 90 and up or when the humidity gets out of control. I'm having problems at 75-80 degree temps, which is concerning for me. The horses are schoolmasters that are fit and conditioned and receive electrolytes etc. When one has had a history of heat stroke, your internal temperature gauge becomes kaput and temps that may not bother others, becomes an issue for you.

The lessons are strenuous and I believe that "balls to the wall" trotting is an accurate description :lol:. I personally am in excellent physical shape- I just have zero tolerance for the heat anymore :( I'm just worried that since I'm having trouble in "lower" temps, what am I going to do when it's a bona-fide 80-85 degrees out.

The lessons are take what you get, there's not a lot of flexibility in the schedule because they do their training in the am and then offer two days of lessons a week- but only two 1 hour lessons get scheduled on those two days. So I HATE having to reschedule :/ I do all of my personal riding early, I need to figure out what I can do better to stay cooler and more hydrated on the days when it's NOT too hot to take lessons- but hot enough for me to have trouble with the temps.

mtngirl
May. 29, 2011, 12:43 AM
I'll relate my personal experience:
I had one that lasted at least 8 years...and it underwent about as much abuse as you could imagine. The original directions called for you to soak them for 30 minutes.

Let's see...the vest was soaked overnight many times...left (unintentionally) in a cooler of ice where the ice eventually melted completed and the vest was left for several days in the cooler...again, many times.

Said vest finally succumbed to about a 1/2 life use after my mother got hold of it and thought it needed washing. :eek: I think it might have survived even that except for the "spin" cycle :cry: ...by then the little jellies were being flung out out of the quited squares. Still, it's now half as plump when soaked but still works...just not as good as it used too.

I got a new one last year (different color so I can wear it as my vest at schooling shows in the summer) and I soak it for a couple of minutes and then put it in a bag and pop into the ice chest. So far that's working well.

patch work farm
May. 29, 2011, 09:40 AM
HUGE vote for cool medics vest! I cannot ride without it in the summer, just don't get the white one for obvious reasons. When I got mine, my saddle was new and I got a short one so it wouldn't get the saddle wet-only came in black and white, so I got the white-bad judgement on my part, looks pretty gross 4 years later-but still works and I ride at home so it really doesn't matter. They also make a "horse vest" that cools the horse. Also ride in the vented Tipperary-wow, what a gorgeous site I just described!

GimmeQs
May. 29, 2011, 08:11 PM
Well I DO have a white one, for shows. I've ridden in it twice, putting it on immediately before I get on the horse and taking it off even before I undo my girth and it still has some smudges ~ how do I get it clean?! Can I Scotchguard it? Bleach? I tried a quick geeeeentle hand wash and the dirt didn't budge! :confused:

allintexas
May. 29, 2011, 08:21 PM
I try to ride as early as possible, and take lots of breaks when it is very hot.

a few years ago, on advice of my then trainer, I started using "Emergen - C" electrolytes in my water. I find the heat much less tiring now. It is like Gatorade with more vitamins and no sugar.

I also like to put a bandana in a cooler with ice or freezer, then wrap around my neck when cooling down.

Reddfox
May. 31, 2011, 11:19 AM
Thank you all for the suggestions and reviews on cooling products. I ended up talking to my doctor because I felt that my tolerance was way lower than it should have been.

Turns out that because I am on a very low salt diet (1000mg a day max) to help control my Meniere's disease - I have way lower tolerance. The doctor told me to CAREFULLY up my salt intake and drink lots of Gatorade (which has a high sodium content) and that it should help. And, this weekend - we were doing yard work in 85+ temps and I was doing well!!! I rode in the am, didn't want to risk it :)

So, if you are feeling like your heat tolerance is abnormally low - check your sodium intake! (unless you're low sodium for a reason) :)

netg
May. 31, 2011, 11:34 AM
I try to ride as early as possible, and take lots of breaks when it is very hot.

a few years ago, on advice of my then trainer, I started using "Emergen - C" electrolytes in my water. I find the heat much less tiring now. It is like Gatorade with more vitamins and no sugar.

I also like to put a bandana in a cooler with ice or freezer, then wrap around my neck when cooling down.

Are there special Emergen C electrolytes, or do you mean just regular EmergenC?

I hadn't heard that before, but have some and would totally try it...

Arizona DQ
May. 31, 2011, 03:10 PM
I like the Cool Medics vests, but they are sooo heavy when wet. I have one and had a bit of a problem with the length of the vest getting the back of my Wintec saddle wet and the black staining my brand new breeches....:no:

I did find a neat very light weight vest at a dog show. It is a light cotton material but has the cooling pellets sewn in on certain parts of the vest to keep you cool but not make the vest too heavy. I like this better than the Cool Medics..... But I do not think it will stand up for as long as the Cool Medics. It is almost time to get the vests out as the temps are going up here as well...:no:

pheasantknoll
May. 31, 2011, 03:13 PM
I just bought some of those ice sheets for doing horses legs. I am thinking I can put one in the freezer and then put one down my shirt on really hot days. maybe under the sports bra to hold it in place. Has anyone tried this?

PKN