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tle
May. 25, 2011, 10:10 AM
Seems I have a TON of them. How do you get rid of them?

coloredcowhorse
May. 25, 2011, 10:31 AM
Seems I have a TON of them. How do you get rid of them?

Check with local ranchers/farmers/extension service to find a beekeeper.... pretty nicely valued for alfalfal ranchers for pollination (alfalfa seed growers)....they set up big movable "bee houses" for them here as they do a job equal to honey bees and are easier to move around.

deltawave
May. 25, 2011, 11:07 AM
They are pretty tough to get rid of. This is their mating season and they hover and hover and hover . . . not aggressive and they pretty much ignore people and horses, but they give me the willies! Not to mention they drill holes in your barn. :sigh:

They are almost impervious to knock-dead sprays. (and are great at avoiding being squished, great flyers)

We have an exterminator service that comes out monthly to deal with the various insect varmints. They're due to spray the barn for these and other nasties. I always have to make sure the guy who's NOT afraid of horses comes, though--one of the team won't go into the paddock when the man-eating Shetland is out there! :lol:

I've soaked down the rafters of my horse porch with knock-dead spray and that deters other wasps and bees, but it does next to nothing vs. the carpenter bees. Whatever the exterminators use, it is better.

jconnors
May. 25, 2011, 11:14 AM
My boyfriend and I take a radically different route. It keeps us in practice for goose hunting season. We take little 22 long rifle's with bird shot and just start shooting them. Its our little fun way. We kill up to 200 bees a session. Just make sure the horses are away from the barn...:D

wsmoak
May. 25, 2011, 11:16 AM
Seems I have a TON of them. How do you get rid of them?

We have the house (log home) and outbuildings sprayed every year, as soon as we see them start flying, which is quite early in the season.

I don't like killing bees, but according to our agricultural extension agent, carpenter bees aren't very good pollinators anyway. And eating my house is Not Allowed.

And these guys show up early in the season, well before the "good bees" emerge, so hopefully we're not doing _too_ much damage.

The males are the ones chasing you around the yard, and they don't sting. (The females do, but they're busy making holes in things.)

If you prefer a non-chemical approach... play beeminton! You can swat them out of the air with a badminton racquet, and then squash them.

kiwifruit
May. 25, 2011, 11:17 AM
I feel your pain! I have a log cabin and the carpenter bees are just feasting on it! There is a special white powder that you use to puff into the holes. I was told when they go back into the holes, the powder kills them. Our local exterminator does this on areas that he can reach but I need to call in a special person that deals with log cabin issues to treat the entire house. In involved high ladders and a lot of time. Or you can do what my husband does, he gets an old tennis racket and whacks them dead. Great for relieving frustrations! Good luck!

jconnors
May. 25, 2011, 11:53 AM
If you prefer a non-chemical approach... play beeminton! You can swat them out of the air with a badminton racquet, and then squash them.


We have done this also! And a wiffle ball bat works too!

Heliodoro
May. 25, 2011, 12:01 PM
Another log cabin home owner here, we have our house treated by an exterminator that specializes in outside house treatments. She comes out up to twice a year, depending on how bad they are.

That and a tennis racket...

LauraKY
May. 25, 2011, 12:05 PM
Paint the wood. Spray with permethrin. Stuff the holes with steel wool.

ponygirl
May. 25, 2011, 12:20 PM
Seems I have a TON of them. How do you get rid of them?

Electric tennis racket. :D

SMF11
May. 25, 2011, 01:24 PM
We have a ton here too. I did some online research and they are pretty valuable as pollinators, esp. as the honeybee population is dropping. You might want to think twice before getting rid of them

If it helps, know that the hovering bees are the males protecting their territory. They *cannot* sting. The females apparently can, but they are up in the holes and not hovering.

My barns have been standing since 1790 and 1845 respectively, so I doubt the bees are doing any real harm.

Just a different perspective.

ChocoMare
May. 25, 2011, 03:24 PM
We play Beeminton every year. The kitties find it great fun to finish off the ones that just get stunned. :D

coloredcowhorse
May. 25, 2011, 05:06 PM
You can also purchase "bee board" that is pre-drilled wood for them and encourage them to nest where you want them to.

AliCat518
May. 25, 2011, 05:11 PM
Another vote for beeminton.

But I say this as a person who is too scared to actually do it. My SO stands by the feed room every day and has to kill about 20 with the raquet before I can go near it. All bees TERRIFY me. People tell me the males dont sting, but im justy too scared. We also have wasps....ugh. WHEN DO THEY LEAVE!??!?

wsmoak
May. 25, 2011, 05:28 PM
You can also purchase "bee board" that is pre-drilled wood for them and encourage them to nest where you want them to.

Those are for mason bees. Carpenter bees won't use them, they insist on making their own holes. In my house. And, apparently, in my brand new pressure treated fence posts!!

The white powder will be drione dust, and the spray is permethrin-based. Both of them are available for DIYers, but we have a two-story house and nothing strong enough to spray up in the second story eaves.

If you find a hole, you can fill it with wood putty. Curiously, they will not chew their way _out_, only in.

One fun thing that can happen if you let them make a bunch of holes in the fascia boards on your house... the woodpeckers will tear it apart to get to the larvae.

They're pretty much done for the year in this area. The battle will begin anew next year.

ETA: Here's a link explaining why they aren't great pollinators: http://www.ent.uga.edu/bees/pollination/other-pollinating-bees.html#carpenter

ReSomething
May. 25, 2011, 10:23 PM
. . .
If you prefer a non-chemical approach... play beeminton! You can swat them out of the air with a badminton racquet, and then squash them.

This^.

UpperFallsFarm
May. 26, 2011, 08:50 AM
Badminton racquet is a great way to get rid of them! Hahah.... Sadly this is what we use!

S1969
May. 26, 2011, 09:05 AM
Another log cabin owner. Hate the carpenter bees. Our exterminator won't bother because they say it is just a waste of your money. Nohing will last more than a few weeks and the sprays aren't very effective even for that small period of time.

Spraying into each hole & filling them is the best way to keep the population down. Very difficult on the upper levels.

We use a butterfly net and step on them. Never thought about a badmitton raquet....hmmmm

kcmel
May. 26, 2011, 09:10 AM
I puff "drione" into the holes, and that works pretty well. Except now they have drilled really high up so I am just having to live with them.

Lieslot
May. 26, 2011, 09:10 AM
Katarine directed me to this last year :
http://www.carpenterbeesolutions.com/products-to-get-rid-of-carpenter-bees.html

Works great. We catch a good number ever single day.
Actually I need to order a few more boxes.

You just need to find the right spot to hang them up. I have some boxed I catch no less then 15/day and other boxes hardly any. Seems high up in sunlight works best.

And also beeminton with the bugzapper, my husband is going for 1/2hr zap every evening.

the_other_mother
May. 27, 2011, 07:24 PM
There is a powder that you're supposed to squirt in the holes and, the theory is that when the beeds go in and out they they carry it in on them and kill the ones inside. We were told that they ones you see this year are the ones that hatched in last years un powdered holes and in order to keep the population down you have to keep the holes powdered to keep them from hatching. Husband also corks the holes shut after he powders them. We were seeing a downward swing in the population last year but this year there are some hanging on. You can get the powder at an Agway or farm supply store, I dont remember the name but it says in the front that its for carpenter bees.

casper324
May. 28, 2011, 10:03 AM
Well I found a great reason NOT to take down my Christmas lights off my porch, the string and lights make it hard for the bees to get to the wood beams and I virtually have none when I typicall have hundreds.