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TKR
May. 19, 2011, 01:13 PM
I am in central Alabama. Had my pasture sprayed x 2 for weeds already. The plant that keeps showing up and spreading is coming in again and in more areas. Apparently the spray didn't get it. I first thought it was a form of thistle. The guy who sprayed looked at a small a few weeks ago and called it coffee weed. So, I've done some research via computer. It's not coffee weed, it is pig weed - seems to be the "smooth pig weed" variety. It also appears this stuff is very hard to eradicate and has given farmers in Georgia and the SE some real headaches. Anyone have experience with this stuff and success in getting rid of it? Insights or advice appreciated. I am calling the guy who sprayed with some printed information to see if he can spray again before this stuff matures and produces seeds. TIA
PennyG

walkinthewalk
May. 19, 2011, 03:58 PM
From what I have read the one and only way to eradicate pig weed is to literally hand pull ALL of the root system from the ground.

Nice job for the 12 yr old if it's in a back yard in suburbia but I'm not about to attempt that on 23 acres and I am a lonnnng old ways from 12:lol:

We keep our place bushhogged down to 6" - 8" of grass height. That's the best we can do and hope for the best.

My horses will get skin rashes from eating the grass near the pigweed. The vet said for them to just brush against the pigweed while going after the surrounding grass is like me pulling full bloom poison oak off a tree without being covered in a zoot suit.

If you hear of some old-fashioned "fix" please share:)

rmh_rider
May. 19, 2011, 05:35 PM
What spray was used?

When we had our pastures sprayed by Southern States (in Alabama) they used Grazon. Not sure if that kills the pig or not.


I had bad thistles. I went out, and cut by hand, to the ground and then sprayed round up down it's throat. Also took any I cut and put in a bag and tossed in the trash. Took a while to get rid of it. It is also grown by seed. Seed can last over winter easy. I have sur-essa. Hate it, nobody eats it. Need to have it sprayed, but we will spray next year. In the meantime I am keeping things mowed. I have no idea how these weeds get around so easy.

I am in N. AL. We only have 15A.

walkinthewalk
May. 19, 2011, 07:24 PM
In the meantime I am keeping things mowed. I have no idea how these weeds get around so easy.

Isn't it amazing that, even a drought, there's no grass to mow, but all the weeds sure find a way to keep growing and reproducing:confused:

sid
May. 19, 2011, 07:32 PM
Hate the stuff and it just loves areas of pasture that are overgrazed in a drought.

The roots are so darned deep you can never get rid of it by hand. To "control" it from spreading, have to get it before the seedheads emerge. There are millions of the tiny things that just propogate the following year.

My best effort is just to mow the them down to ground level all summer long so they do not propogate. In a few years you will have less, then spray, then just keep mowing.

They are so darned deep rooted and they spray their seeds everywhere.

The only other option is to just till it up and keep tilling. Arghhh.. Hate the stuff...:mad: but I've managed to keep it either under control or "going away" by this method. Good luck! :)

not again
May. 19, 2011, 07:36 PM
Pig weed round here survives drought very well, We bush hog as soon as it sticks it's stem high enough, and before the immature seeds appear. I boarded one horse that was particularly sensitive and came in looking like it had four bowed tendons, which went down with washing. Horrible stuff!

bird4416
May. 20, 2011, 07:59 AM
My horse dumped me into a pigweed patch. That sh.. um, I mean stuff sure does hurt when you land in it. The type that grows around here has thorns. We've been keeping the pastures bushhogged and that helps a lot.

TKR
May. 20, 2011, 08:25 AM
Yes, mine has thorns also. What really irks me is that I hired an "expert/professional" to spray last month. So he came out and looked at what I wanted killed. Took some samples. The pig weed was really small, and I told him the only reason I was having him spray was to get rid of it, the yellow flowers (stink weed) was secondary. He came out and sprayed, was very thorough. Came back to spray what was missed and I showed him the pig weed again and told him I was concerned it didn't get it. He identified it as coffee weed and said what he had mixed up would get every kind of weed. Well, guess what -- it might as well have been fertilizer -- didn't phase it at all, coming up all over. So I researched it on the internet to identify it since I really didn't know what it was at the time, thought it was thistle, which he told me it wasn't on first visit. Printed out alot of information, went to see the Ag agent, we looked it up in his book. Called Dale and told him, he just goes on and on about how much he spent on chemicals to spray and what a great deal he gave ($500 for one field) and he was under contract with a big company and couldn't break loose, etc etc. So I mailed the printed literature off the internet to him, called the Co-op and asked my feed dealer about what they would recommend also. I guess I'm just out the $$, because he has the money and it doesn't sound like he's going to do much even though originally he told me he would get rid of the weeds I wanted killed, would be very thorough, come back and spray again and wanted his customers to be satisfied, blah blah blah. So much for an expert and customer service.
PennyG

ngilland
May. 20, 2011, 08:38 AM
Sounds like that it has become chemical resistant(depending on what they used to spray). Talked to hubby about it last night and this is what he recommended (fertilizer and chemical manager for Co-Op)
GrazeOn Next at 2.6 pints an acre (if it is not resistant)
If it is, you will need to either get some Ignite or HalexGT. Both of these will need to be spot sprayed and it will take a few weekly applications.

ngilland
May. 20, 2011, 10:55 AM
Sounds like that it has become chemical resistant(depending on what they used to spray). Talked to hubby about it last night and this is what he recommended (fertilizer and chemical manager for Co-Op)
GrazeOn Next at 2.6 pints an acre (if it is not resistant)
If it is, you will need to either get some Ignite or HalexGT. Both of these will need to be spot sprayed and it will take a few weekly applications.

crosscreeksh
May. 20, 2011, 03:45 PM
Pig Weed is REALLY BAD STUFF!! Do some Googling!! We almost lost one of our best fillies to it years ago when we lived in NC. "Some" horses develop an obsession for eating it... it causes Pigweed Intoxication and Pigweek poisoning, the prickers ulcerate the esophagus. Our filly was scoped and put on medication, but the vets feared she would not recover from the lesions. We had to keep her in an isolation paddock where there were no weeds for months and fed her NO HAY, but hand picked grass and Pawlonia leaves (another story). Our farm was pristine neat and tidy, but a load of hay from a local farmer introduced the weed!! We PAID him to import our problem!!! Killall or Roundup spray will do it in, but you have to hand spray as it kills all the grass, too. BAD STUFF!!!
Good Luck.

dawglover
May. 21, 2011, 08:48 AM
Our current farm was a pig weed and
dock weed factory when we bought it. The former farmer never did much in the way of weed control. We had the entire 25 acres sprayed with roundup to kill existing foliage, then disced everything in and waited until stuff started growing again and hit it with roundup a 2nd time. Then we planted grass seed and spot sprayed and kept everything mowed to golf course length for a couple of years. Those damn seeds can last for YEARS in the soil. We finally beat it but it was expensive and time consuming.

mbharvey
Oct. 3, 2012, 03:12 PM
The Pig Weed dilemma is becoming a major area of concern for farmers in Georgia. Check out my blog: http://mbharvey.blog.com/2012/09/17/pigweed-problems-in-georgia/[/url]

lorilu
Oct. 3, 2012, 06:41 PM
I spot spray with round up. I have found that if you mow it the cuttings sprout.....

L

Bacardi1
Oct. 4, 2012, 01:31 PM
I never had it in paddocks or pastures; just in the garden. Pulling after a heavy rain was the only way I got rid of it.

buck22
Oct. 4, 2012, 04:16 PM
this isn't helpful in any way but I found it interesting it was once cultivated as a food crop:

http://communitygardennews.org/gardenmosaics/pgs/science/english/pigweed.aspx


does say the seeds can stay viable in the ground for up to 40 years!