PDA

View Full Version : Saying No to potential buyers....



HFSH
May. 18, 2011, 12:27 PM
I think people must think I've lost my mind.

I have a lovely 4yo dutch gelding for sale. We're getting him going u/s now. I'm being a bit particular about who I'm going to show him to, and here's why.

1) he's expensive. I don't have the time to show him to lookey-loos who can't afford him, and no, I won't sell him for 50% off his price, even if you did score 66% at First level Test 1. :winkgrin: 2) He's no AA horse. And 90% of the calls/emails I get on him are Training/First level riders. :no:

So I tell callers, I will not show the horse to a Tr/First level rider. He's too much horse for someone who's not at least got their silver. He's more forward or "hot" than most people can ride.

So when trainers call, wanting to bring their clients, this is what I tell them. LOL. I know they think I'm crazy, but I don't want to sell a horse that may hurt someone because they're scared of his huge movement, and I frankly don't want him ruined.

So, trainers, would this shock the h*ll out of you, hearing this on from a seller?

mickeydoodle
May. 18, 2011, 12:35 PM
I think it is refreshingly honest, good for you.

suzy
May. 18, 2011, 12:42 PM
I think you could save yourself and callers a lot of time if you were more up front in your ad and stated that the horse is for a professional only and the price is firm. And, regarding the silver medal prerequisite...I have seen a number of silver medalists that got their medals on schoolmasters and have absolutely no business riding a pro's horse, so I think that is an invalid criterion to use.

fordtraktor
May. 18, 2011, 12:45 PM
It is fine, but realize that most people with money to buy such horses are the working amateurs, not the pros -- even if many of them pay pros to ride the horses once they are bought. So you are probably going to make it hard to sell him if you will only sell him to a pro type.

GreyStreet
May. 18, 2011, 12:51 PM
I agree, I think you're going to have a relatively difficult time selling him if you keep the silver medal prerequisite. I think riding can be a very individual thing - just because I earn a silver medal on my horse doesn't mean I can ride yours. Just because someone has ridden to an advanced level doesn't necessarily make them a well-rounded rider, depending upon their experience. There is nothing wrong with being firm about the price and picky about the rider, so long as you are in no rush to sell. And also, so long as you realize that once he's out of your hands, that control is gone.

PiaffePlease
May. 18, 2011, 01:09 PM
I agree, I think you're going to have a relatively difficult time selling him if you keep the silver medal prerequisite. I think riding can be a very individual thing - just because I earn a silver medal on my horse doesn't mean I can ride yours. Just because someone has ridden to an advanced level doesn't necessarily make them a well-rounded rider, depending upon their experience. There is nothing wrong with being firm about the price and picky about the rider, so long as you are in no rush to sell. And also, so long as you realize that once he's out of your hands, that control is gone.

I agree with this. I know several people with their silver medal (or some scores towards it) that CANNOT ride a horse other than theirs. One certain person I know who almost has her silver cant even get other horses to canter.

Then you have people who are showing say, 3rd level who has catch ridden everything under the sun who might be just fine handling your horse.

I totally understand you wanting the right match for your horse and can see where you dont want a first level rider. But, I wouldnt say that only someone who has their silver can buy him. Someone who has their silver, is going to buy a horse who can get them their gold soon.

CZF
May. 18, 2011, 01:21 PM
I'm just going to put this out there.

I was student rider for a GP trainer for many years. I mostly rode young Hanoverian horses recently imported from Germany. I had a boatload of experience riding big moving WB's (and lord knows you have to be able to ride at least decently to work with youngsters all the time) but because of their age the highest I ever got to show was first level (scores in the 70's BTW :) ) and it was mostly bronze level shows, just to get some experience under their belts. We did not want to get passports for all the sales horses, as it was a revolving door in terms of horses coming in and selling usually within months.

Now at home with some of the older guys, we were schooling canter pirouettes, passage, changes, half pass etc., but they were my trainer's show horses or a more advanced horse who wasn't quite ready to go into the ring because of behavioural issues. Technically I don't have anything on record that says I can ride more advanced horses.

Would you have sold him to me?

Also, how do you know how much money a person has when they call? Do they have to send over a bank statement? Obviously if someone is asking for 50% off the price, they are not worth your time. But I think a certain amount of negotiating is to be expected.

Is a talented horse happier knowing your goal is GP? Or could they be happy with a kind loving owner even if they are only showing at lower levels? I'd much rather see a talented horse with a less talented rider than the other way around (as long as it's not creating a dangerous situation). I've seen many horses get pushed beyond their capabilities, and it's heartbreaking. I bet pros ruin more horses than ammy's.

I'm just saying...

But I do respect you for trying to find a suitable rider for your horse. Obviously if the rider is totally out-horsed it would not be a suitable match and chances are neither would be happy in the long run. So that would really be my criteria, if a horse is a difficult ride, I'd make sure they brought a trainer and that the trainer was aware of the horse's issues. Just keep an open mind, you're really going to limit your market if you're being *too* choosey.

Now having said that, if I were ever to sell my horse, I'd probably ask for a background check. LOL.

ETA: There are also some really talented riders who don't like to show. Obviously if you want a show home for him, that would be a deal breaker, but they might still be a wonderful home if that's the priority.

I think most pro's want something that's proven, so if you're limiting yourself to a professional, you might think about hanging onto him for now and putting some more miles on him.

PS. checked your site, and he's a really lovely boy :)

HFSH
May. 18, 2011, 01:49 PM
I have seen a number of silver medalists that got their medals on schoolmasters and have absolutely no business riding a pro's horse, so I think that is an invalid criterion to use.

I know, oooh trust me, I know, but it's a starting point. :winkgrin:

And CZF, I do ask questions a lot, I don't really just cut people off. I explain, he's a hot horse, he's very forward, he has BIG gaits.

I have a whole ton of pros wanting to come see him, and shame on me for being so damn slow to start him. But--I wont' get on him. I haven't been riding all winter, so I'm not fit to be starting a horse, so i have an event rider friend helping me.

Oh, and my ad does say he's suitable for a Pro or a "top amateur." Should I remove that last part??

Velvet
May. 18, 2011, 01:56 PM
Are you sure the people offering 50% less can't afford it and it's not that they have a better grasp of the horse's real value?

I'm just asking...

suzy
May. 18, 2011, 02:03 PM
I think "pro or talented amateur training with pro" is perfectly acceptable. There are amateur riders out there who are better than some of the pros, so you shouldn't rule them out. In fact, most of the (ahem) older pros I know have top, young amateurs riding their young horses. Not because they don't have the skill but because they no longer have rubber bones.

Calhoun
May. 18, 2011, 02:07 PM
So be diplomatic to each caller and tell them about his age, big gaits and hot personality. Ask them if they can afford the asking price, it is firm. You can say whatever you like, it's how it's conveyed that makes the difference. You never know if the training level caller has a friend at the barn looking for your described horse. Good luck.

GallantGesture
May. 18, 2011, 02:10 PM
I think it's great you are being honest about what the horse is, and being choosy about finding the right match. However, I think the silver medal thing is not quite the right criteria for judging the "right" rider, instead it is severely limiting the number of prospective buyers. Unless, of course, what you are trying to do is select a rider that will get the horse all the way to GP, in which case you probably need to hand pick the rider and offer them the horse, or better yet, put the horse in training with that rider. As a breeder (I'm assuming here), there would be some very good reasons to pursue that path.

Otherwise, on the open market to get top dollar, you might find a better match by looking for the type of buyer that can ride a young, green, forward, big moving horse than by looking for the type of buyer that can ride an older, well-schooled, may or may not move big type of horse. And, IMHO, your ideal buyer may or may not have a silver medal, or any upper level experience at all, since riding a greenie, and especially a big moving greenie, requires a very different skill set and mentality. There's also the potential for someone not-quite-qualified to buy the horse and then put him in training with a very qualified rider, which doesn't seem like it would be such a bad situation?

Have you tried networking with trainers that specialize is young horses of your horse's caliber?

2tempe
May. 18, 2011, 02:55 PM
Here's my thoughts: sounds like owner is being honest in what she thinks is right for the horse. IF my trainer thought I could ride said horse based on the ad and if she called, she would have the discussion as to why she thought that. More likely she would say thanks, might be too much horse, and would appreciate the honesty.
I have a friend who bought a hot upper level horse, without trainer input and its entirely possible that the temperment, though not the lovely gaits, will be problematic for her.

I think its perfectly reasonable for an owner to put their own criteria on the sale process...

Big_Grey_hunter
May. 18, 2011, 03:05 PM
Your ad is misleading. Your add says that "Artie's been started under saddle, walk-trot, very quiet, easy, very uncomplicated. " But then you tell people he is hot and forward and not for a low level rider. Which is it? If you advertise him as uncomplicated but hot, you will probably get less training/1st level rider inquiries.

HFSH
May. 18, 2011, 03:26 PM
Excellent point. I'll fix that. :yes:

atlatl
May. 18, 2011, 03:33 PM
Good for you. I was very honest about my qualifications when I was looking to buy and on more than one occasion had sellers tell me their horses were AA friendly and even though I had been only riding at the walk for 1 year that it was a match. I can't tell you how many horses I went to see that after watching the selling ride I didn't even get on.

dudleyc
May. 18, 2011, 03:43 PM
I just checked out your site - It looks like a lovely horse and the price seems very fair.

I would look at him if I were in the market (and I have my silver lol)

TKR
May. 18, 2011, 03:56 PM
I am very picky about where my youngsters go as well. A good match is my criteria and I've turned down offers and people who wanted to come back. However, I ride mostly youngsters and thus lower level stuff. However, since Thoroughbreds are what I love and youngsters are my niche, a big moving wb and hot or sensitive/complicated would work fine for me because I love those. I've seen some upper level riders who tend to push a youngster and expect them to be able to work as long and hard as any other horse. They don't always have the interest, tact or know-how to put a good foundation on any baby. So, don't slam all the doors too quickly. It might be in the horse's best interest to spend some time talking to those who call about their skill level with youngsters and bringing them along than to worry about their show record. JMHO -- good luck!
PennyG

Isabeau Z Solace
May. 18, 2011, 04:05 PM
Ummm obvious question. You say your 'event rider' friend is riding him. Does that person have dressage silver ? Also, since you are not riding him, I would question how well you could describe the ride to someone else. What does your event rider friend have to say ? They are the one sitting on him.

Carol Ames
May. 18, 2011, 04:18 PM
Be careful you don't shut out a potential right person, sight unseen:o; I’ve nearly done that at least twice “on paper” it would never:no: SUIT; YET IT WORKED! In both cases the instructor/ trainer/ coach was convinced it would work;); talked them and me through last minute nerves:cool:; and they both worked beautifully; of course , there was also a lot of prayer:lol: , even a wish on a “falling star:winkgrin: we both saw one night, walking back to the barn; Actually it was a display ad in the eventing issue of COTH; a crackerjack photo:yes:; well written :winkgrin:ad, if I do say so myself; yet I got no calls:no: until the right one came;), 8 months after the issue came out:o:yes:

katie+tru
May. 18, 2011, 04:19 PM
Ummm obvious question. You say your 'event rider' friend is riding him. Does that person have dressage silver ? Also, since you are not riding him, I would question how well you could describe the ride to someone else. What does your event rider friend have to say ? They are the one sitting on him.



Just a heads up from Eventworld: if they are an upper level eventer they would have experience doing travers, renvers, half pass, and pirouette I believe. That is certainly beyond First/Second level riding. The rider could very well be a fine dressage rider who fits the expectations of the OP without being a USDF participant.

Kyzteke
May. 18, 2011, 04:20 PM
So I tell callers, I will not show the horse to a Tr/First level rider. He's too much horse for someone who's not at least got their silver. He's more forward or "hot" than most people can ride.

So when trainers call, wanting to bring their clients, this is what I tell them. LOL. I know they think I'm crazy, but I don't want to sell a horse that may hurt someone because they're scared of his huge movement, and I frankly don't want him ruined.

I don't know why anyone would be "shocked."

Part of selling horses (IMHO) is not just getting the bucks and pushing them out the door -- it's MATCHING horse and rider/owner. That is of primary importance.

I try very hard to do that, not because I feel for the people that much (so sue me), but because it will ALWAYS go badly for the horse if you don't. And I DO feel for the horse.

I realize this is a different discipline, but I had an endurance prospect who was/is talented as heck, but she would only suit someone with skill and knowledge in starting a young, hot, VERY FORWARD animal. I said that over and over again.

One gal who assured me she was a great fit, I actually had come ride one of my other horses first. When she got dumped off of THAT one, I told her, "sorry...this other mare will eat your lunch."

Not all horses are right for ammies. Period. Nothing wrong with saying that.

Again, I'm not sure why anyone would be "shocked" at this disclaimer...

PS and when I use the term "ammie" I am speaking of a lower level rider without much experience with this type of horse. There are ammie's who have been riding for years that would do just fine and so-called "pros" who might not.

Carol Ames
May. 18, 2011, 04:34 PM
Velvet , with out the shuttle, how do you get the horses to the moon:confused:? I'll bet they ALL have LOTS of suspension:lol: up there!

Are you sure the people offering 50% less can't afford it and it's not that they have a better grasp of the horse's real value?

I'm just asking...

Carol Ames
May. 18, 2011, 04:39 PM
I'm trying to imagine riding a dressage test on the moon; and imagine the flying changes would send riders flying; Just imagine taking flight in one of the air vests, the eventers wear!

AllWeatherGal
May. 18, 2011, 04:46 PM
There's also the potential for someone not-quite-qualified to buy the horse and then put him in training with a very qualified rider, which doesn't seem like it would be such a bad situation?

*raising hand*

Especially since folks are saying that your young horse is very well priced, if someone is buying for the long-term, s/he may be quite happy to have the horse in full training with a pro. I'd vaguely dreamed that my (at the time young) horse would reach FEI before I started riding her regularly.

rothmpp
May. 18, 2011, 05:14 PM
So, my two cents - I would be very leery in this market of turning away a potential good fit for a sale based on an arbitrary set of requirements to even see the horse. Particularly the part about the silver medal. There are quite a few AAs without their silver medal for many reasons, and it is not always a lack of talent/ability. It is not cheap to get your silver medal. I, myself have scores through third, have ridden/schooled through PSG but then life as an adult happened. Horse got sold. Work got in the way. When I came back into a financial position to purchase a horse, yours easily could have been an interest for me. Would likely have been able to handle him just fine. You would've had no interest in me because I did not have my silver?

Though in this market, I would've marked you off as a nutty breeder with unrealistic expectations, considering what you can buy for the money you are asking for him.

You're totally within your rights to say, "I don't think you're going to be a good fit for my horse, but thank you for your interest." I just would tend to ask a few more questions than "Do you have your silver medal?". "What is your experience with young, forward, hot, big gaited horses?" would be a bit more accurate for this horse. There are plenty of people out there whose education came from breaking all kinds of babies and rehabbing horses off the track that don't show enough to have their silver, but could totally handle your horse.

thatsnotme
May. 18, 2011, 05:24 PM
I don't have my silver, lack of finances keep me out of the ring very often. I don't even have my bronze. I am a competent rider, start my own youngsters and have been riding for 38 years. I have been, in the past, competitive in many different disciplines. I frequently ride my trainers green horses, and can handle a very hot horse (actually prefer them). I have schooled some 4th level horses, but have never shown above 1st. If I were in the market for something to move up on, (and had the money) you wouldn't let me look at him?
I think you need to be careful about generalities. Espescially over the phone

HFSH
May. 18, 2011, 05:28 PM
Yup yup, I've not exactly described my discussions here to a T, but again, I do feel out the people to see what their skill set is.

and to those who asked, many event riders are awesome to help start horses because they can deal with the fun bucks, bolts, spooks you get from youngsters, and they have a lighter 'jump' seat. (A rider who's used to dealing with a gallop, jumping from a gallop, etc). And someone who's helping me start the horse isn't the person who is buying the horse -- 2 very different concepts there. It also helps that she weights about a buck. Lol. :lol:

Equibrit
May. 18, 2011, 06:36 PM
"A challenging and rewarding ride for an experienced rider" should cover it. I would not rule anybody out because you just never know until you've met them.

NJRider
May. 18, 2011, 07:39 PM
I think it is great that you are focused on the right home for your horse. I have a young horse for sale and both people who tried him were at best, advanced beginners that misrepresented their riding ability, or live in a fantasy world. It taught me that my horse is a very good boy!
It cracks me up they they want a horse with "upper level potential" yet they are unwilling to put any effort into basic riding 101....learning to steer would be nice, lunge lessons, etc.

staceyk
May. 18, 2011, 08:33 PM
Are you an experienced, skilled rider looking for your horse of a lifetime? This highly talented, sensitive youngster is offered for sale to a home that will provide the right environment and training. [details about horse]. Price is firm. Serious inquiries only.

TickleFight
May. 18, 2011, 08:54 PM
I can understand being particular about selling your horse. However, based on what you've said it probably will be difficult to sell him. Don't assume that just because somebody is a beginner in dressage that they don't have plenty of experience in another discipline. Also, I have seen some novices that are plenty capable of handling hot, forward horses. If a rider like this comes along and they have a decent trainer... then why not?

Since your horse is young, expensive, and relatively untrained, the more advanced riders are likely going to pass him over. You may want to consider keeping him until you can sell him to this sort of rider, or content yourself with selling him to an experienced horse-person new to dressage, or to a talented novice with a good trainer.

Just some food for thought.

Dutch Lovin' Dressage Rider
May. 18, 2011, 09:33 PM
Lovely horse! Just wait. The right owner will come! I have a horse who sounds very much like yours. Mine is more broke. Would also like an fei owner but dont say so much in the ad. Listed as private treaty. I have had 3 offers since for sale. A few pros saw and loved him. Waiting for the right person. Latest fei pro just saw him. Discussions going on now. Sit tight. It WILL happen. His match will come!

Chase23
May. 18, 2011, 09:39 PM
Is this horse suitable for a skilled lower level rider with a trainer? That might help expand your market. I am a first level rider who purchased a 4 yr old, big moving warm blood. It works because my trainer is there every step of the way so far. In fact my barn is full of horses that spent their 4-5 year with trainer and then ammy took over.

dressurpferd01
May. 18, 2011, 10:50 PM
Mmmmm...nevermind.

2tempe
May. 18, 2011, 11:13 PM
One additional comment to the OP - looked at your website and you seem to have very nice horses; I'm presuming that when the "not so right" buyers call re your big guy that you mention you have some other, more ammie friendly ones available?

PhoenixFarm
May. 19, 2011, 01:03 AM
I have noticed that with certian folks, trying desperately not to sell them an innapropriate horse makes them want it even more, LOL.

I had a pony for sale, who was a super eventer, but not in any way a kids pony. The same Mom called me every week for six weeks, trying to get me to let them come and try the pony for her 9-year-old. Her can barely canter, and has never jumped 9-year-old. At the end of the sixth week call, she snarled, "You've had that pony for six weeks, why haven't you trained it for my daughter yet?!"

Uh, because it's not a training issue?

Similarly, I've been trying to sell a horse with a lower price tag, because I want him to go to a young professional. He's fancy, but a tricky ride. I've had every Pony Club Mom, high school kid with a dream, cheapskate, etc. in the state call. Luckily I think I've found the right person (Please, please, please) CUZ i'll be glad to list him as sold so they leave me alone.

For all the complaining about fruitless trips to look at misrepresented horses, I sure find a certain percentage of buyers aren't so easily disuaded, LOL.

netg
May. 19, 2011, 01:23 AM
Just judging by the differences in prices on your page I'm guessing it's not so much that he's forward, but that you believe he has the potential to win internationally, or at least nationally, and that's why you're being more picky?

If that's the case, I don't know why you even say silver - you want a gold medalist who has trained horses to GP on him, I'd think. If you think he has that potential - I'd say it. If not outright, then in the closest wording you can get to saying it without sounding like a fool. I'm sure plenty of horses with that potential don't make it due to riding, and if you believe in him, wanting him to have the right riding/training is totally reasonable. Your description of him as forward and energetic wtih big gaits in no way preclude riders who don't have silver medals from riding him well, especially as green as he is. What you appear to be concerned with is his future showing - so why not say that somehow in the ad?

And just a tip - bays have black legs, so when describing a horse who has white on three legs, the fourth leg isn't described as having a stocking - it is already understood that the leg is black if it doesn't have white on it, just like it is understood the other legs are black above the white. Saying it has a stocking means the leg has a high white marking on it, which his doesn't.

CounterCanterer
May. 19, 2011, 02:08 AM
Are you sure the people offering 50% less can't afford it and it's not that they have a better grasp of the horse's real value?

I'm just asking...

Snarky much?

paulaedwina
May. 19, 2011, 06:35 AM
I like this,

"Are you an experienced, skilled rider looking for your horse of a lifetime? This highly talented, sensitive youngster is offered for sale to a home that will provide the right environment and training. [details about horse]. Price is firm. Serious inquiries only."


That is so lovely and effective IMO.

Paula

CosMonster
May. 19, 2011, 09:20 AM
"A challenging and rewarding ride for an experienced rider" should cover it. I would not rule anybody out because you just never know until you've met them.

Agreed. I hope the silver medal stuff you're talking about is more a shorthand way of describing the ability level since there could be a ton of reasons why they don't have it.

Nothing at all wrong with being a choosy seller if you can afford to take the time. Though I think getting calls from unsuitable buyers is just par for the course selling any horse. I've been guilty about calling about horses I wasn't sure were suitable myself, because my client was super interested or the ad was a little ambiguous or whatever. Not trying to waste anyone's time, but it happens. And then there are the truly delusional... :lol:

cheektwocheek
May. 19, 2011, 09:43 AM
I can understand being particular about selling your horse. However, based on what you've said it probably will be difficult to sell him. Don't assume that just because somebody is a beginner in dressage that they don't have plenty of experience in another discipline. Also, I have seen some novices that are plenty capable of handling hot, forward horses. If a rider like this comes along and they have a decent trainer... then why not?

Since your horse is young, expensive, and relatively untrained, the more advanced riders are likely going to pass him over. You may want to consider keeping him until you can sell him to this sort of rider, or content yourself with selling him to an experienced horse-person new to dressage, or to a talented novice with a good trainer.

Just some food for thought.

This.

vxf111
May. 19, 2011, 09:47 AM
I don't think there's ANYTHING wrong with weeding out buyers. In fact, I think it's prudent.

That being said, I am with the group who thinks...

1. The ad needs to be CRYSTAL CLEAR. Price is fim. Horse is hot/forward/sensitive. This is a future bigtime horse but GREEN and needs to be in a serious program. Your website has lots about his breeding and his color (some of which is described oddly) but very little about how this horse is himself to ride/handle. If you included that information, I think the calls from lower level riders would decrease. I can't blame them for calling on the ad as it is now, it's not entirely clear from the ad that he's unsuitable.

2. Your questioning of buyers who call ought to be a little more specific to their goals/riding ability and less to a specific showing accomplishment. Not "do you have your silver medal?" but more "tell me about your riding, what you've done, the kinds of horses you've ridden, your goals, who you work with/train with, and the kinds of horses you like."

It's a lovely horse. It's a lot of horse. You're doing the right thing by trying to find a suitable home-- I just think you need to be a little more open to ways of ferreting out that home.

vxf111
May. 19, 2011, 09:50 AM
I will also add that I don't think the price is crazy. I can see someone paying that if he's really what they're looking for.

cheektwocheek
May. 19, 2011, 09:56 AM
I don't think there's ANYTHING wrong with weeding out buyers. In fact, I think it's prudent.

That being said, I am with the group who thinks...

1. The ad needs to be CRYSTAL CLEAR. Price is fim. Horse is hot/forward/sensitive. This is a future bigtime horse but GREEN and needs to be in a serious program. Your website has lots about his breeding and his color (some of which is described oddly) but very little about how this horse is himself to ride/handle. If you included that information, I think the calls from lower level riders would decrease. I can't blame them for calling on the ad as it is now, it's not entirely clear from the ad that he's unsuitable.

2. Your questioning of buyers who call ought to be a little more specific to their goals/riding ability and less to a specific showing accomplishment. Not "do you have your silver medal?" but more "tell me about your riding, what you've done, the kinds of horses you've ridden, your goals, who you work with/train with, and the kinds of horses you like."

It's a lovely horse. It's a lot of horse. You're doing the right thing by trying to find a suitable home-- I just think you need to be a little more open to ways of ferreting out that home.

Weeding out buyers is a great idea, once you have established Absolute clarity in your advertisement description. If potential buyers can't seem to process the info given, that's when suitability can be addressed.

Oakstable
May. 19, 2011, 10:03 AM
I started a similar thread in the breeding forum on how to prequalify a buyer.

I've seen teenagers who are far better riders than AA. And some teenagers come from families with DEEP pockets who will pay for a young horse who will be competitive in a tough circuit like SoCal.

I appreciate Hopeful Farm's position. When you produce something above average, you want it in a home with the talent and resources to make something of it.

I had one that I thought was truly special and I let him go for a ridiculously low price plus training for another horse to someone who is a dedicated competitor. She got pregnant the following year, the horse went on the back burner, and is now at age 11 competing at 3rd and 4th level. He's also had some soundness issues this past year and was on a long layup.

Is their video online of this horse under saddle?

HFSH
May. 19, 2011, 10:57 AM
Catching up this morning.

You guys/gals are awesome!! So many great ideas here. :yes:

does this sound stupid? "suited for a Professional or top AA who is looking for their next National prospect."

I guess I'm a bit bashful. I think this horse is awesome but I don't want to be totally barn blind. :winkgrin: That's why I do appreciate the comments from everyone.

Sally-- no u/s video yet. We're re-starting him u/s now since I gave him all winter off (wait, is winter even over yet?? It was 30 degrees the past few nights). He's also in a new barn, with 100+ horses, and he's settling in to all that craziness, so I'm being really cautious I guess. Had a nice 1 hr session last night with him, he's getting there! But you know how it is, you want a really good video, not just any old video. So, I'm being patient I guess. His rider (eventing gal) is off to an event for this weekend, so I'll do more ground work this weekend, then back at it monday.

Oakstable
May. 19, 2011, 12:08 PM
Where is there a barn around Madison with 100 horses?

Professional video is critical. I've had a horrible time with memory cards that filled up half way through a test, video that I download and it has compression problems, on and on. I'm ready to hire someone. You can only make a first impression once.

fordtraktor
May. 19, 2011, 01:03 PM
You're totally within your rights to say, "I don't think you're going to be a good fit for my horse, but thank you for your interest." I just would tend to ask a few more questions than "Do you have your silver medal?". "What is your experience with young, forward, hot, big gaited horses?" would be a bit more accurate for this horse. There are plenty of people out there whose education came from breaking all kinds of babies and rehabbing horses off the track that don't show enough to have their silver, but could totally handle your horse.

I tend to agree with your post but don't think the OP is going to scare off too many prospective buyers like this -- I'm probably in this category and have several friends with the same skills, and none of us has ever laid out $35k for a 4 year old. Not exactly OP's target market.

The ammy sponsoring the pro to develop her future FEI horse, though, that IS the target market! Have lots of friends going that route and none with a silver medal, but all with the $$ for this horse. Their pros all have a silver or more, and they are the ones actually going to be riding the horse the vast majority of the time, at least for the first few years and if it hits the big time, probably forever.

The horse looks lovely, good luck finding him a show home where he can reach his potential.

HFSH
May. 19, 2011, 01:14 PM
Where is there a barn around Madison with 100 horses?

Professional video is critical. I've had a horrible time with memory cards that filled up half way through a test, video that I download and it has compression problems, on and on. I'm ready to hire someone. You can only make a first impression once.

Belleville has several larger barns. Green Meadows has 100+. Saddle Ridge probably has 50+. Hoofers I think must have around 40ish. All are right next to each other essentially.

HFSH
May. 19, 2011, 01:16 PM
The ammy sponsoring the pro to develop her future FEI horse, though, that IS the target market! Have lots of friends going that route and none with a silver medal, but all with the $$ for this horse. Their pros all have a silver or more, and they are the ones actually going to be riding the horse the vast majority of the time, at least for the first few years and if it hits the big time, probably forever.


Yup, exactly, and those people are always very forthcoming when I've communicated with them. Either the AA calls, but usually it's the pro. I have about 8 pros waiting on video of this horse. *sigh* We'll get there. :yes:

hntrjmprpro45
May. 19, 2011, 02:43 PM
Catching up this morning.

You guys/gals are awesome!! So many great ideas here. :yes:

does this sound stupid? "suited for a Professional or top AA who is looking for their next National prospect."

I guess I'm a bit bashful. I think this horse is awesome but I don't want to be totally barn blind. :winkgrin: That's why I do appreciate the comments from everyone.


I would use the description "upper level prospect with the talent to be nationally competitive" and "perfect mount for a professional or serious amateur with knowledgable trainer".

Don't worry, we all get the occasional delusional buyer trying out horses wayyyy out of their league. Just try to be as upfront as possible when talking on the phone and ask lots of questions!

HFSH
May. 19, 2011, 03:51 PM
Lol. I just looked for the like button. I like that wording hntrjmprpro45. Thanks! :yes:

Big_Grey_hunter
May. 19, 2011, 03:59 PM
I would use the description "upper level prospect with the talent to be nationally competitive" and "perfect mount for a professional or serious amateur with knowledgable trainer".



:yes:

WILLOW&CAL
May. 19, 2011, 04:34 PM
That is my dream horse! Good luck finding a perfect match for him. With the right training he will blow someone's socks off.

SanJacMonument
May. 19, 2011, 07:28 PM
If I were a potential buyer, I'd be nervous that you really didn't know the horse very well because you cannot ride it yourself. Maybe you could quote your trainer or have your trainer help with the ad. Does big movements mean too big - Maybe both horse and rider can grow together?

Most would agree though, respect is higher for sellers that are brutally honest because so many are not.

I don't see anything wrong with being picky about the buyer. People who sell quality horses, dogs, hogs, etc., usually want a good show home too.

showidaho
May. 19, 2011, 08:17 PM
I just have to throw this out there...I understand your concerns about selling your horse, BUT...Once he's sold (no matter to whom you sell him) he's no longer yours. Your buyers could sell him a day later to a green as grass beginner who writes a big check. Either you want to sell him, or your don't. I don't understand your trepidations about selling him to ammy. Most pros will just get him going a bit better and then sell him to an ammy anyway. If you think you are doing yourself a favor trying to find the 'ideal buyer' you might be missing the big picture. As has been stated previously, once sold you have no say. Sure, you want someone who is immensely talented and will give your horse a forever home, but I don't know how realistic that is. I have sold horses to people who were wonderful, but who sold them down the line to people who weren't...it happens and it's not something we can control unless we keep them. ;)

HFSH
May. 20, 2011, 11:35 AM
If I were a potential buyer, I'd be nervous that you really didn't know the horse very well because you cannot ride it yourself.

i don't recall saying I cannot ride him. I said I'm not riding him, because I haven't ridden since last fall. And getting on a nearly unbroke horse when you're not fit is a suicide mission, IMO.

And Showidaho, I know, that definitely could happen. That would suck.

These days there is a lot of risk selling horses. a buyer could come back and sue saying I shouldn't have let them buy him, knowing he was too much for them. Not true, but would be an expensive court headache. :no:

Carol Ames
May. 20, 2011, 11:40 AM
I had people come to me with young, preteen daughters on huge BIG moving WB horses;), daughter should have been on leadline pony; but, local Olympian, in dressage, :lol: told them; the parents, that daughter and this horse have "Olympic potential:cool:" so Dad wants dressage lessons for them; I advised them to go to the Olympian for lessons; and find someone to train the horse so, he will be ready for her. :winkgrin: I expect at some point to read of this horses' debut at 3rd level:yes: possibly with said "Olympian:mad:

Velvet
May. 20, 2011, 01:32 PM
I'm trying to imagine riding a dressage test on the moon; and imagine the flying changes would send riders flying; Just imagine taking flight in one of the air vests, the eventers wear!

Huh? I was off on another thread. :D Missed this. Hey, I like the inexpensive ones. Don't need no fancy movers. Cheap price tag here makes it easier to pay the fuel fee--and then there's the fact that ANY horse can do an awesome passage on the Moon! :eek: :lol:

Velvet
May. 20, 2011, 01:37 PM
Snarky much?

Read my signature. Boy, did you read into it. :rolleyes:

It was an honest question. IF the horse is difficult to ride and is not an ammie horse, then the ammie's will not offer as much. If the horse is not a team quality horse, then upper level riders might not offer you as much.

I was asking her to do a double check because she was having a lot of people come in wanting to offer less. At that point, you have to stop and take a hard look at the market you're advertising to and compare the horse to others to see if he matches the market. If he does not, is he marketed incorrectly due to skills, natural ability or price.

You might want to read the words on the page rather than listen to the ones in your head. :lol:

showidaho
May. 20, 2011, 04:47 PM
These days there is a lot of risk selling horses. a buyer could come back and sue saying I shouldn't have let them buy him, knowing he was too much for them. Not true, but would be an expensive court headache. :no:

I know! I too am in constant fear that someone might become litigious about a horse issue...We must try to be realistic though - you seem quite forthcoming about your horse and as long as you don't misrepresent him (which in reading this thread I know you won't) my advice is to entertain all serious inquiries. Certainly you have a price in your mind and that is what he's worth to you, so if you don't have to entertain low-ball offers, then just say the price is firm. Perhaps you can network him through a competent trainer in your area who would have an in with good pros...Although if he were mine I would very much give ammy riders a chance.