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View Full Version : Cross Ties--Which End Where?



the_other_mother
May. 17, 2011, 07:44 PM
On cross ties with a panic snap on one end and a bull snap on the other, which end is supposed to hook to the halter? Ive seen people do it both ways. I have mine hung with the panic snap at the wall and the bull snap on the other end. Am I wrong? :confused:

manentail
May. 17, 2011, 07:54 PM
I can't reach the end on the wall, so I put my panic snap on the horse so I can reach it easily. But if your taller, it should be on the wall so that you can release the horse without being practically underneath him.

LauraKY
May. 17, 2011, 08:08 PM
If I have a horse that I'm not sure of, or one that is prone to panic, I always attach twine to a cross tie at the halter with a snap. They freak, the twine breaks, better than my cross tie breaking.

I also never use bungee ties...they recoil if they release and can cause serious damage to horse and human.

cutter99
May. 17, 2011, 08:14 PM
I always keep the panic snap at the wall whether it be in the cross ties or in the trailer. I want to be able to release the panic snap and at least try to keep myself safe. Have you ever tried to free a panicking, scrambling horse at the halter? I have in my younger, more stupid days, when I used to think that helmets were optional!

deltawave
May. 17, 2011, 08:17 PM
Another eternal question with no consensus. :D

Do it however you like. Personally I loathe both bull snaps and those easy-release snaps, but since that is what is available, I prefer the quick-release one to be up on the wall, away from the horse so I can get to it without getting too close to a panicky/stuck animal.

Keebler will break twine like it's . . . string when he's bored on the cross ties, so that's a no-go. :rolleyes: I do like the bungee ones since they give a little. Mine are all in leather halters, which are going to break long before the bungee/snaps do in most cases.

Remember that you really can't be 100% safe, and although we all need to do the best we can, it's very common for one person's favorite setup to give another person the horrors. :)

Xanthoria
May. 17, 2011, 08:20 PM
What would you prefer?

Having to reach up to a panicking horse's head past his scrambling hooves to undo him?

Or reaching to the wall and unsnapping him easily so he runs off with 8' of nylon webbing and a heavy snap on the end dangling around his legs on the concrete aisleway?

Personally, I prefer neither!

A better design is to have solid brass (breaks easier than steel etc) trigger snaps (easier to attach/unattach on a day to day basis than quick releases or bull snaps which both need 2 hands) on both ends of a cotton rope (breakable) ideally attached to half a thickness of baling twine (new baling twine is stronger than you think!) at the halter end of the cross tie.

Or velcro cross ties (http://www.smartpakequine.com/tiesafe-ties-1620p.aspx) :yes:

SuperSTB
May. 17, 2011, 08:21 PM
Panic snap at the wall... I also use bailing twine for quick breakaway.

emcfarling1
May. 17, 2011, 08:22 PM
Panic snap on wall.
Have you ever tried to reach for a horses head when they are freaking out? Impossible!
Glad someone made a tread about this. It is one of my biggest peeves!
I always leave the throat latch of the halter undone while crosstied in the event of panic. The halter just pulls over the ears and the horse wanders off unscathed. wouldnt recommend that for a Smart A** horse who learns he can pull out though!
Hay twine and zip ties work well to connect cross ties to the walls.

mroades
May. 17, 2011, 08:27 PM
Panic snap on wall.
Have you ever tried to reach for a horses head when they are freaking out? Impossible!
Glad someone made a tread about this. It is one of my biggest peeves!
I always leave the throat latch of the halter undone while crosstied in the event of panic. The halter just pulls over the ears and the horse wanders off unscathed. wouldnt recommend that for a Smart A** horse who learns he can pull out though!
Hay twine and zip ties work well to connect cross ties to the walls.

I have seen an undone throatlatch cause irreparable damage to an eye when a horse pulled back....

everafterfarm
May. 18, 2011, 09:29 AM
I agree with most, quick release on the wall. My guys are big WBs and I am vertically challenged, not to mention I do not want to be near big hooves when horsey is freaking out. ALL my guys also wear leather all the time, they often give before I can get the release snaps apart anyway. Thankfully it is not an issue I have to deal very often!

tasia
May. 18, 2011, 11:55 AM
I always keep the panic snap at the wall whether it be in the cross ties or in the trailer. I want to be able to release the panic snap and at least try to keep myself safe. Have you ever tried to free a panicking, scrambling horse at the halter? I have in my younger, more stupid days, when I used to think that helmets were optional!

This:yes: I also use the safety ties with the velcro that pull apart. You can adjust how easily they come apart and no broken cross ties, about 6 inches of cross tie left on horse to recapture them with and no trailing cross tie to chase them or wrap around legs. Just hope your horse doesn't figure out that they do come apart;)

Just Wondering
May. 18, 2011, 12:00 PM
quick releases or bull snaps which both need 2 hands

Quick release/panic snaps do not require two hands. I can easily work a bull snap with one hand.

Trevelyan96
May. 18, 2011, 12:11 PM
I absolutely HATE the bull snaps, so I attache the bull snap to the ring on the wall with a single piece of twine so it will break easily, and the panic snap to the halter.

Trevelyan96
May. 18, 2011, 12:13 PM
I have seen an undone throatlatch cause irreparable damage to an eye when a horse pulled back....

My BM hooks the undone end of the throatlatch to the ring on the same side so it's not loose.

SmartAlex
May. 18, 2011, 12:31 PM
I bought the Blocker rings and snapped those to each cross tie ring. Conundrum solved.

Equibrit
May. 18, 2011, 02:28 PM
You stay safer if you release the wall end.
However, your horse is then free to swing around a lethal weapon.

On the other hand - don't crosstie.

PiaffePlease
May. 18, 2011, 03:40 PM
Ive seen it both ways, but it you are tall enough to easily reach where its mounted on the wall, put it there.

Everyone always says "I have a leather halter, it will break before (insert horsie thing here)". thats never been my experience. The metal on the halter (usually the throat snap), or the lead line snap, or the cross tie snap breaks first.

Also, I hate bungee snaps. They are scary as hell when they break. Think about it. You're trying to release the cross tie when it snaps and the metal pieces come flying back at your head at a high speed.

Wayside
May. 18, 2011, 03:48 PM
I've heard people argue that panic snaps don't release by themselves, but in my experience, they do. Have seen them opened by pulling horses numerous times, sometimes not even pulling very hard, so I always put the panic snaps on the halter side.

amastrike
May. 18, 2011, 03:49 PM
I use nylon halters with leather crowns or leather breakaway tabs. IME, those always break before the twine between the crosstie and the wall. In which case, which end of the crosstie you snap where is irrelevant.

Now I have blocker tie rings and 10' lead ropes for crosstying. LOVE it. When my horse panicked and ran back, she was able to pull enough slack to calm down. All I had to do was have her come forward a few steps and pull the slack back out of the leads.

LauraKY
May. 18, 2011, 04:12 PM
I don't cross tie if I think they will panic. If I'm training a horse to cross tie, I use twine attached to a snap from the end of the cross tie to the halter. And I keep a lead rope on and in my hand in case of panic.

I never use bungee cross ties. My boarder used to be a vet tech and saw the results of a panicked horse and a bungee cross tie. Not pretty. We have a couple sets, got them really cheap when we first moved here, but I don't use them. Which reminds me, they need to go the the used tack shop.

I attach the panic end to the halter.

Bogie
May. 18, 2011, 04:16 PM
This:yes: I also use the safety ties with the velcro that pull apart. You can adjust how easily they come apart and no broken cross ties, about 6 inches of cross tie left on horse to recapture them with and no trailing cross tie to chase them or wrap around legs. Just hope your horse doesn't figure out that they do come apart;)

I've been using velcro cross ties for about 5 years and they are great. My horses have rarely gone through them (except in a real panic over something) and then it's quite handy to have the dangling cross tie end so you can catch them.

I use them in my trailer, too.

katie+tru
May. 18, 2011, 04:33 PM
I've been using velcro cross ties for about 5 years and they are great. My horses have rarely gone through them (except in a real panic over something) and then it's quite handy to have the dangling cross tie end so you can catch them.

I use them in my trailer, too.



I second the velcro. It's pretty strong and will hold if a horse pulls back lightly or tries to walk forward. It will rip apart if they start standing up though. Only thing we've found is that sometimes you'll get a big, strong horse that will realize he can break the velcro without much effort and will do so when he doesn't feel like standing still for the farrier, vet, etc. or is mildly spooked by something.

jump4me
May. 18, 2011, 04:42 PM
For my cross ties, I have the panic snap at the wall, and a sisal-twine loop at the halter end.
For my straight stall ties, I use an old lead rope tied to the wall with twine, and the snap at the halter end.
Trailer ties has the panic snap at the wall. He always chews twine in the trailer for some reason, so I stopped using it there.

2DogsFarm
May. 18, 2011, 04:58 PM
Do what makes you feel safe.

For me, that means the quick-release end on the wall & a cheap aluminum carabiner clip attaching the crosstie to the halter.
Carabiner opens/breaks easily if a horse is really pulling back, but otherwise holds & I can work it one-handed.

& I hate bullsnaps too :mad:

Give me a good old trigger bolt snap any day that I can unhook one-handed! :yes:

jilltx
May. 18, 2011, 05:19 PM
As for the panic snap I always prefer it on the wall end, if you can reach it there. I also agree that it's nearly impossible to get next to a panicking horses with the snaps on the other way, but I also find that it is a hot topic with many people. ;)

I taught myself years ago to open bull snaps one handed. It's not that difficult with a little practice and it comes in very handy. :)

MsM
May. 18, 2011, 06:10 PM
I agree with the Blocker tie rings! Those who insist on the panic snaps on the wall obviously have always had a set-up where they could reach the snap. Being short, that has virtually never been the case for me.
I like to use plain old trigger snaps. Lead lines on blocker rings work great. Otherwise I would be sure to use a breakable halter or, in a pinch, I have made a small loop of twine, stuck it through the halter ring, and snapped the tie to that.
How fussy I am about it depends on my horse and situation. And not crosstying is not always the answer. Current horse is much more likely to pull back or spazz out if tied with one line - he is more comfortable on well-adjusted crossties. Of course if the area is getting difficult, I try to find an alternative (holding or putting in stall, etc)

Montanas_Girl
May. 19, 2011, 08:16 PM
I hate both panic snaps and bull snaps. I can't work either quickly or one-handed. I'm too short to reach the end of the tie on the wall, and no way am I going near a panicing horse's head. So, I like plain old trigger snaps on both ends, attached to twine at the wall end.

That said, I won't own a horse that won't stand tied anywhere, anytime, under any circumstance, so what kind of snap is attached where is not something that I worry about much.

cyndi
May. 20, 2011, 08:42 AM
Turtle snaps. They come undone easier than the metal 'quick release' things. IME, with turtle snaps, the horse doesn't even have time to get into a scrambling panic before they release. Which makes horsie much less likely to go charging off once they're released. The few times I've witnessed mine coming released, the horse just sort of blinked and didn't even move from the spot once she was released.

I would never want my horse loose with the cross tie attached to her halter with a heavy piece of metal swinging around at the end.

Dad Said Not To
May. 20, 2011, 10:39 AM
Turtle snaps at the halter. They're not difficult to work one-handed and they will release under pressure, unlike panic snaps.

Watermark Farm
May. 20, 2011, 12:21 PM
Panic snap on the horse, bull snap on the wall. That way when horsie pulls back, cross ties stay with the wall and don't fly toward the horse. That said, I hate panic snaps.

I had a horse pull back and had the panic end on the wall. Dumb. The cross ties belted the horse hard and she took off running with cross ties chasing her. It was a pretty bad scene, very scary mostly because of the way the ties freaked her out.

Now I have those cross ties with velcro. If they pull back, a short (12") piece of cross tie stays attached so you can grab the horse more easily. They are hard to find but great!

Rhyadawn
May. 20, 2011, 12:46 PM
I absolutely HATE the bull snaps, so I attache the bull snap to the ring on the wall with a single piece of twine so it will break easily, and the panic snap to the halter.

I hate them too. It's why I make my own crossties. I put the panic snap at the wall, and a regular snap (like on a dog leash) at the other end. I make them out of nylon rope (braided back).

mswillie
May. 20, 2011, 01:07 PM
I prefer the panic snap on the wall. The barn where I board now does it the other way.

For my own cross ties I just attach a plain snap hook to the bull snap and use that on the halter side. I can open those easily with one hand if I need to and I'm tall enough to reach the panic snap on the wall.

I always pinch my hand on the panic snaps. :mad:

Tiki
May. 20, 2011, 01:18 PM
I HATE bull snaps, however, those of you that think you can always undo a trigger snap have never had 1200 lbs of horse pulling on one that is tied to something. When there is that much weight on it, you can pull the thumbsnap down as hard as you want, but with the halter ring, or the wall ring at the far end of the snap, good luck getting it off.

Big_Grey_hunter
May. 20, 2011, 03:26 PM
I like a regular snap (like a dog leash) to attach the horse too, but otherwise I don't really care. We attach them wall snap with bailing twine for safety, so the type of snap doesn't matter

trinityhill
May. 20, 2011, 09:16 PM
We use a bailing twine loop that hangs down far enough to access from the ground, panic snap to that, regular bolt snap to the horses' halters. Also, all of our horses are also trained not to panic if they step on their leads (school horses and kids/new riders make mistakes), so leads are left on and looped over their neck for easy safe access for leading the horse back forward if they start to get tense hitting the limit of the cross-ties. Along with only breakaway/thin leather halters being used in the cross-ties. All cross-tie areas are ribbed rubber-matted or gritty stone dust for traction. Multiple ways for a horse to safely get out of or relax after a panic in the crossties. Works very well for us.

EventingJ
May. 20, 2011, 09:23 PM
I don't mind bull snaps, but I prefer the "regular" snaps with bailing twine. If I had to use those crossties, and I was worried about the horse freaking out, I would probably put the quick release on the wall as long as it was easily reachable. Generally speaking though, if the horse is flying back, I am usually ducking and moving out of the way (used to bailing twine and things breaking before I can get to them!)

MelantheLLC
May. 20, 2011, 09:40 PM
Panic snap on the horse, bull snap on the wall. That way when horsie pulls back, cross ties stay with the wall and don't fly toward the horse. That said, I hate panic snaps.

I had a horse pull back and had the panic end on the wall. Dumb. The cross ties belted the horse hard and she took off running with cross ties chasing her. It was a pretty bad scene, very scary mostly because of the way the ties freaked her out.

Now I have those cross ties with velcro. If they pull back, a short (12") piece of cross tie stays attached so you can grab the horse more easily. They are hard to find but great!

This. The panic snaps on the horse end, so that it breaks out of them if it pulls that hard. The last thing I want anywhere near me is a panicked horse with two 6 foot lines with heavy snaps on the end flailing loose. Seems to me just the initial release at the wall end would be incredibly risky to your head! Are those who do this holding on to the cross-tie after they release it from the wall? Then you're attached to said panicking horse, and if you let go, or the horse yanks it out of your hand, the cross-tie has that lethal snap recoiling on your end.

IME, when they've broken themselves out of the panic snaps, the snaps drop immediately off the halter, away from anybody's head range. If they were still attached to the horse as it reared and/or bolted, they'd be like rocks on the end of bullwhips.

To each his own I guess.

Teacup
May. 20, 2011, 09:41 PM
I have the most difficult time releasing a panic snap (and usually get pinched) even when the horse is taking a nap. I don't know why I have so much difficulty. I despise bull snaps, but they're not nearly so difficult for me as panic snaps. The trigger snaps seem to be the easiest for me to undo.

The few times we've had a panic, the twine at the halter (or the halter itself if no twine) has broken. Luckily, once broken, each horse has always calmed down as if to say "Oh, nevermind!' Also luckily, those events have been rare.

Calamber
May. 21, 2011, 08:04 PM
Make sure the horse is conditioned well enough to not panic easily. One of the best ties I have seen was some kind of slighty giving (not any kind of bungee) rubber tie, which looked like it could hold a large boat, unbreakable snaps, tethered to unbreakable rings, mounted very well into a thick, (you guessed it) unbreakable timber. Horses panic most when they feel something giving in their panic. It is best not to allow a horse to break anything loose or get free ever. Otherwise, clearly, they learn their own strength. If they break their necks, well that saves you quite a bit of trouble......Oh, and the snaps, bigger panic snaps near the halter. I don't want a line swinging around if the worst happens and I would like the option to jump in and free the horse if it is not already freaking. If it is, just stand back out of the way and pray.

Nezzy
May. 21, 2011, 09:27 PM
i prefer the bull snaps on the halter and the quick release on the wall. You don't unhook them, they come undone on their own, hence the name, QUICK RELEASE. I don't think it matters but doing it my way, the ties will be left hanging on the horse and possibly easier to catch. but that can backfire also, and the snap can smack him if it comes undone too fast.

Kryswyn
May. 21, 2011, 11:33 PM
NO NO NO NO NONONONONONONONONO

Walk AWAY from those unbreakable nylon cross ties w/bull snaps and panic snaps.

Please buy 2 10' soft cotton heavy lead ropes. Make sure your eyebolts are 8' off the ground. Put the butt end of the rope through each eyebolt and snap it together with the one on the other wall. Adjust the height of the joined snaps to the average horse in the barn. Then tie each rope with a safety knot with the end hanging down where you can easily reach it and release it if the horse panics.

Now, if he's loose he's got two soft ropes hanging from him, and if he's galloping like a fool at least he's not being hit in some vulnerable area with a heavy snap (of either kind). And you haven't had to dodge his hooves to get to his face to release him.

sketcher
May. 22, 2011, 08:57 AM
It is best not to allow a horse to break anything loose or get free ever. Otherwise, clearly, they learn their own strength. If they break their necks, well that saves you quite a bit of trouble......

In theory,I get where you are coming from here.

I saw across tied horse slip in the cross ties once and break her neck.

A horse doesn't have to be misbehaving or purposely trying to escape to have bad accident. One little spook, 4 shoes, concrete aisle on that day equaled a dead horse.

And yes, it was incredibly stupid to have a horse standing on concrete but regardless, horses will always find stupid things to do and have freak accidents in ways you can not predict.

Lieslot
May. 22, 2011, 11:13 AM
Panic snaps at halter. I use rubber donut crossties, they break ever to easily. Sometimes mine just pull forward a little, coz they are being a pain or simply trying to reach for the treatbucket next to the ties and the rubber donut just snaps and it didn't even frighten them. I'ver replaced countless rubber donut crossties, just because they pulled a little. In a panic situation those will break instantly and you'll only have short piece of tie hanging of the halter.

Bit of Britain has a new interesting piece :
http://www.bitofbritain.com/Equi_Ping_p/3449.htm

atr
May. 22, 2011, 03:00 PM
I agree with Kryswyn on this one. But I tie baling twine to my eyebolts and tie the ropes to it.

Jaideux
May. 22, 2011, 05:51 PM
I hate those damn panic snaps. They are on the crossties at my barn, and *every* time I try and unsnap them (you know, every time I'm on crossties!) I end up punching my horse in the nose by accident! No matter how much I plan, no matter how delicate I try to be, I always always always bump him in the nose. The poor fellow is very polite about the whole thing, but it feels pretty sh!tty to me to do that- even by accident- to such a well-mannered horse who was just standing there minding his business.

I would suggest getting regular crossties and using bailing twine as a break-away. Put the twine down at the horse end if you're worried about it getting free and having 4' of rope trailing around it. Having it at that end also makes it easy to replace the twine if it does break. Nothing more annoying than finding a broken crosstie and needing to rent Paul Bunyan to repair it.

Or, get those velcro ones. Very practical, if you can afford them.

danceronice
May. 24, 2011, 10:50 AM
I've heard people argue that panic snaps don't release by themselves, but in my experience, they do. Have seen them opened by pulling horses numerous times, sometimes not even pulling very hard, so I always put the panic snaps on the halter side.

This. I've seen NON-panicing horses jerk their head hard enough to release them. I don't have to reach it to release, it comes off on its own.

And I put them on the wall. I want something safer to catch them by than trying to grab a halter. Only time Benny ever freaked out, they came away easily and we had a lead on him already when he slowed down enough to catch.

And I find it hard to believe baling twine breaks. I can barely cut it. (Referring to the sissal type, not nylon, which isn't going to break for anything.)

aspenlucas
May. 24, 2011, 11:27 AM
I don't cross tie if I think they will panic.

Bingo, we have a winner! Teach your horse to tie and then which end it's at is a moot point. :)

SmartAlex
May. 24, 2011, 12:57 PM
My horse stands tied on three legs yawning most of the time, but probably twice in 5 years enough mayhem has rained down around him to make him want to pull.

Training doesn't cover all eventualities.

Calamber
May. 24, 2011, 07:03 PM
In theory,I get where you are coming from here.

I saw across tied horse slip in the cross ties once and break her neck.

A horse doesn't have to be misbehaving or purposely trying to escape to have bad accident. One little spook, 4 shoes, concrete aisle on that day equaled a dead horse.

And yes, it was incredibly stupid to have a horse standing on concrete but regardless, horses will always find stupid things to do and have freak accidents in ways you can not predict.

I guess I assumed that everyone who cross ties a horse on a slippery surface would have mats. Good thing I do not write text books on this subject. Can you imagine not putting down mats on concrete.....sigh.