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FatCatFarm
May. 13, 2011, 01:22 PM
Pros/Cons? Am thinking of taking in a year old female who used to be a house pig. Would like advice on what to expect? Too much trouble? Will I have to cordon off my hay to keep her out of it. Will she likely be going after the dogs' food? (We have 3 big livestock guardian dogs) Will the dogs likely be a problem? Will she be happy at the barn with her own kiddy pool during the hot months? I'd like to give her run of the farm. Thanks for any help.

FatCatFarm
May. 13, 2011, 01:23 PM
Oh and must you get the females spayed? And if so, how much does that cost? And where would you go to get that done anyway? University vet clinic? As I don't think any of the large animal vets, or the small ones for tht matter, do pigs. She's already had one litter and will be an only pig.

ladybugred
May. 13, 2011, 02:02 PM
I know this isn't exactly what you asked for, but I started a thread on Micro Pigs (http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=292293) and there were some poosts that might answer some of your questions.

Good luck

LBR

SGray
May. 13, 2011, 02:18 PM
the thin kiddie pools won't hold up for long

it will eat the dog's food but if you put dog's food up on something that they can jump to problem solved

no males around, no problem with babies

(my friend/neighbor had a pbp for ~12 years)

RacetrackReject
May. 13, 2011, 02:26 PM
I rode at a barn that had a pot-bellied pig in residence and after that I boarded at a barn with a dwarf pot-bellied pig. I have to say, those guys are pretty fun.

I don't remember either pig breaking bales of hay, but both would make a bed in any loose hay that was in the hay room in the barn or sleep in the stall of horses that didn't clean up all their hay. They learned pretty quickly which horses were kosher with the idea.

None of the barn dogs ever really had a problem with the pig, but none were LGDs.

The only issue I have really seen is that some horses just never learned how to deal with the pig. Most would become blah about the whole thing after a while, but we had 1 or 2 that just knew the pig was a bear who was going to eat them if they ever took their eyes off it.

Also, when we had schooling shows, we would have to lock the pig up so he didn't disrupt everything. Their favorite time to go out and about is when there are a large number of people with food and new horses milling about it seems.

Pigs are smart about staying cool. They know how to bump troughs to get the water to splash out so they can lay in it and when the arena is being watered. They are also not above spilling their own water to lay in it.

Pig poop is really not much harder to clean out of stalls than horse poop. They seem to wander into open stalls any chance they get.

FatCatFarm
May. 13, 2011, 03:14 PM
Good to know. This girl is about a year old and 45lbs, so not huge. Even if she grows a bit. And for just $50 bucks, even if she doesn't work out, no big loss, but might be fun to have around. Thanks for the feedback.

Epona142
May. 13, 2011, 03:20 PM
I have one around here. The ponies went bug-eyed at first, but now ignore him.

He prefers to sleep in hay or manure piles. He has a house...maybe I'll just throw manure in it?

He's not neutered yet and will attempt to molest the dogs, who don't care. Our LGD (GP) ignores him.

I hear females will go into raging heat quite often and be horrible, but I've never had a female.

mand_asbfan
May. 13, 2011, 04:17 PM
I hear females will go into raging heat quite often and be horrible, but I've never had a female.


My old trainer had a female pig. When she'd come into heat, she would be very clingy to people and occasionally would try to hump a leg or two :D THEY WILL EAT ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING IN SIGHT so make sure all food like substances are off the ground (no treats in groom boxes on the floor). While I liked the pig, I now understand where the term "pig headed" came from.... just something to keep in mind :winkgrin:

Go Fish
May. 13, 2011, 08:02 PM
Uhmmm...they're loud. REALLY loud, especially when they're mad. Let's just say they have an opinion on everything. Kinda like a mother-in-law.

Their feet need trimmed about twice a year. Seriously, this is not easy. And, finding someone who will do it is no cake-walk, either. Be sure and wear ear plugs.

Mine isn't a lot of trouble and he's really good at guarding the chickens.

This is one of the few animals on the planet that my Corgis avoid like the plague. :lol:

Epona142
May. 13, 2011, 08:04 PM
Mine will scream and squeal if the dogs are running...cause he can't quite keep up. I find it highly hilarious

ladybugred
May. 13, 2011, 10:29 PM
Are we trying to EN-courage or DIS-courage her from keeping the pig????????

As far as I am concerned PBP(some very small) bacon sounds good :lol::lol:

LBR

shalomypony
May. 14, 2011, 12:12 AM
We have one at work.He's the barn manager....he's smarter than all of us put together!lol

walktrot
May. 14, 2011, 08:43 AM
There have been 2 at our barn over the years. The first was female, and the second a male that the b/o had fixed. A few horses never quite adjusted to them, on account of the danger of being swallowed in one gulp.

They each just lived their lives wandering around the farm doing whatever it is that pigs do. They definitely got in the dog food if it was left out. They were fun to have around. But when the male died last fall, the b/o said no more pigs, or goats, or bunnies, or guinea pigs or other miscellaneous creatures. We still have chickens, though.

FatCatFarm
May. 14, 2011, 10:09 AM
Interesting the varying opinions. Alas it's moot as the pig was sold before we could get there. I may keep my eye out for another female.

baysngreys
May. 14, 2011, 09:18 PM
A barn I rode at years ago had one - hated it! It ate everything, and I mean everything, you couldn't put anything down or it would grab it and don't think for a minute you're getting it back!!

It was messy, noisy - grunting, snorting, screaming when it didn't get what it wanted.

It went after my NEW dressage boots one day. I still have teeth marks on the toe.

Seriously, from a boarders point of view, it did not enhance my time at the barn.

CHSatwork
May. 14, 2011, 11:46 PM
I love my pigs. My horses do too. The pigs use their legs as scratching posts and sleep in their stalls. Momma pig had two piglets yesterday. They are soooooooo adorable. Momma Pig will do anything for an iced oatmeal cookie. I will always have at least one pot belly around. Ours are the little ones (about 40lbs).

kristinq
May. 15, 2011, 12:26 AM
Uhmmm...they're loud. REALLY loud, especially when they're mad. Let's just say they have an opinion on everything. Kinda like a mother-in-law.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

PRS
May. 16, 2011, 10:36 AM
I had a female pig for awhile. When she would go into heat she would take a walk on the wrong side of the tracks....literally. There is a neighborhood over there populated by southern country black folks....these are folks that are poor, used to raising thier own food and not adverse to catching a wandering pig for barbeque. These are folks with whom I've never even had a conversation but they know all my business, where I work, my children's names and which animals belong to me. I would get a phone call from some friendly soul that my pig is a'wandering again and some not so friendly souls are considering what she might taste like on a spit and that I should come and walk her back home. This happened several times. Obviously that was a 2 way street because an unknown somebody over there owned an intact male pig that came visiting and fathered a litter of little piggies.
Spaying should be considered. I also own a neutered male pig....please be aware that pigs can live a very long time and are a serious committment. My pig is now 16 year old.

JackSprats Mom
May. 16, 2011, 03:29 PM
I just got a mini pig and she's in with my two goats (a smaller nubian and a pygmy) right next the the horses (who had never seen a pig before).

So far have had no issues (cept the pygmy is bullying her a little as she's smaller then the goat). They will eat dog food for sure!! Ignores the hay, happily forages around for stuff.

They are LOUD! but so far no more or less hassle then the goats which don't really require that much.

Sunnyhorse
May. 18, 2011, 11:37 AM
Just keep in mind that your prospective porcine might get a lot bigger. We had one wander onto our place about 5 years ago. She was adorable, about 75 lb (I was able to lift her, but just barely) and I wanted to keep her, but our ancient Special Guest Pony nearly had a stroke -- wouldn't come into the barn when she was there. She was adorable and affectionate, and our other two horses liked her. No damage to the barn while she was with us.

We ended up taking her to (no joke) Planet Pig (http://www.planetpig.com/main.html), a shelter about 50 miles from us that was home to 150 (now 184, I see) potbellies and one full-sized hog. The proprietor, Sandy, told us that our girl was likely only half-grown. (It wouldn't have stopped us keeping her, but she said that she gets a lot of pigs that are dumped when they start to grow.) We wrote a check for $150, which Sandy told us would cover her initial expenses (spaying and shots).

TheresanAppfurthat
May. 18, 2011, 12:04 PM
Go for it! These little piggies are smart, entertaining, companionable and did I mention entertaining? I've never had one myself, have an old OTTB who is utterly terrified of donkeys (anything actually that brays) and anything that oinks (among his other assorted terrors). But years ago I boarded where the BO had one and this pbp was a complete character. Very, very clean, the horses and pbp got on well, he really enjoyed eating blackberries and blackberry vines and anyone in the PNW knows the invasive blackberry problem is intense so this enthusiastic gustatory preference was much appreciated. He loved to patrol the barn every afternoon, and had a self-important slow swagger that was hysterically funny to watch. His fav thing to do after patrolling the barn was find a hay pile, burrow completely underneath, fall asleep and commence snoring. Significant decibels delivered with that last! You could hear him all over the barn and could tell which pile he was sleeping under because the hay rose and fell with the snore breaths. Haunted hay pile! Goes up and down and snores!

AA Hunter
May. 18, 2011, 12:21 PM
I kept my horse at a barn with 2 pigs, former house pigs that had been abandoned when they got too big. The male was fixed, not the female. They were charming, I really enjoyed them. Sometimes they'd burrow into loose hay in an open stall, but the returning horse would quickly chase them out. The main problem is keeping them from getting too obese. These pigs eventually had very painful, crippling arthritic conditions from carrying all the weight on those little legs. You also have to give them lots of blankets for a nest in the winter, because they don't have much hair to keep them warm.

Horse with No Name
May. 19, 2011, 04:15 PM
There will be another pig come along FCF. I'd love a pig as a pet/family member but I don't think our couch can fit any more on it :D Plus I feel guilty that I love roast pork and bacon so much because pigs are so cool!

I had a young horse grazed on a dairy property that had a couple of young pigs on it, about the size of a Labrador. These pigs would commandeer his hay piles as their beds and he grew to hate them. Unfortunately he translated his hatred for pigs into a hatred of dogs, chasing down and trying to strike any dog that dared venture into his paddock :eek:

I lived at a beach years ago and every so often three huge pigs would come and hang out on our front lawn. I always knew when they were here because my dogs, 1 x long hair German Shepherd and 1 x Rottweiler would refuse to go down the steps. They must have been able to smell them and would go to the far edge of the deck, peer around the corner and if they didn't like what they saw would slink back to bed. They belonged to an old man, all I did was call him to let him know where they were and he'd turn up in his beat up truck and they'd follow him home. They only ever came 2-3 times and didn't wander anywhere else so maybe they were on some sort of pilgrimage?

ParadoxFarm
May. 19, 2011, 06:14 PM
I used to board at a barn that had a pot bellied pig. She was usually in a stall. One day I was there with my dog (which the owners approved). The pig was out that day for some reason. The pig charged the dog. Luckily we were able to get our dog away. Another time, the pig was out again, while I was on the barn phone talking to the owner who was up at the house (she called the barn). The pig came after me, and bit the back of my ankle. Luckily my paddock boots protected me. But I don't like pigs at barns any more. ;-)

MsM
May. 19, 2011, 07:02 PM
Not a pig fan...

I boarded where the BO had one as a pet. It was loose around the grounds most of the day. Noisy. Stinky poop! Noisy. Chewed on everything. Noisy. Difficult to keep out of the way. Noisy. Required hoof trimming which sounded like banshees being tortured! Did I mention noisy? Not Friendly. Will frisk you for food tho. Even have rough skin/hair so not fun to pat! Umm, tended to be vocal...

I tried to like her, but most I could manage was tolerance, and not always that. Horse didnt care as long as she didnt eat his food.

Jaideux
May. 19, 2011, 07:23 PM
I don't remember either pig breaking bales of hay, but both would make a bed in any loose hay that was in the hay room in the barn or sleep in the stall of horses that didn't clean up all their hay.






They learned pretty quickly which horses were kosher with the idea.



Was this pun un- or intented? :)

FatCatFarm
Dec. 2, 2013, 11:37 AM
Revisiting the pig idea after selling the goats who screamed at me constantly. Could. not. take. it. any. more.

Sold the miniature donkeys too as even fat as ticks with plenty to eat, were not above chewing on the trees, fence posts and wood boards.

I re-read the one post above that pigs are also "noisy"? I know they have opinions, but are they constantly noisy? Because, if so, I'll pass. I like my tranquility at the barn and will stick to keeping the two miniature horses. Just thought I'd ask.

alto
Dec. 3, 2013, 04:59 AM
Revisiting the pig idea

Is there a sanctuary within visiting distance? this would be an excellent way to learn more about these animals & experience the range of personalities (& sizes).
They really do best in at least pairs, yes you do want to speuter them, they can range from quite docile to quite the going concern (if you sent the goats on their way, I suspect you'll soon have enough of the "wrong" piggy partner(s))

akstaj
Dec. 3, 2013, 07:23 AM
She is 1.5 years old and about 55 pounds, lives in the house. She is by far the coolest pet I own. She is noisy, but it isn't always screaming, she grunts, purrs, and other silly noises. I always know where she is.

They can be a pain, they will eat everything. The are also quite athletic, she can jump on the furniture.

But she loves attention and loves to cuddle, she sleeps in a crate to protect her from the dogs, but will take a nap with you in a heart beat.

I would recommend doing alot of research, they are not a pet for everyone. You will want to spay them, we only lasted one heat cycle before we had it done, she was awful.

Depending how big the pig is, a livestock vet will usually treat them and trim their hooves, or you can go the expensive route and take them to an exotic animal vet. We use both...

SuckerForHorses
Dec. 3, 2013, 09:01 AM
I want a piggie as our next indoor pet but my SO says "N...O!"

ThistleDewDressage
Dec. 3, 2013, 09:06 AM
Pigs are awesome, but if you are looking for a quiet non destructive animal I would pass. Our PPB is also an indoor boy. He is smart, charming, funny, clean, and sweet. He is also destructive, highly food motivated, loud at times, and very driven.

FatCatFarm
Dec. 3, 2013, 09:11 AM
I'm only considering one as an outdoor only pet for the barn. NO house pigs! LOL!

ThistleDewDressage
Dec. 3, 2013, 09:17 AM
I only meant to demonstrate the difficulties indoor or out. Spaying or neutering is a must, You do not want an intact pig. Some pigs can be very aggressive and they do frequently get attacked by dogs so that is a concern, ours is confined to a fenced in area or inside. There are a ton of rescues out there, so try not to buy one from CL or BY breeders. They get dumped all the time. They are cute but not for most people. If the goats and donkeys were too much chances are so is a pig.

FatCatFarm
Dec. 3, 2013, 09:22 AM
I agree, anything porcine will be fixed. And they do sometimes show up on CL already spayed or neutered. I'll check around to see if there is a rescue. But yes, as the mini donks and goats were PITAs, I wanted to get more input about mini pigs.

arlosmine
Dec. 3, 2013, 09:32 AM
I tried it and the pig experiment was a fail here.

There were five horses on the property. Two never cared about the pig, two were terrified for about five days and got over it. One NEVER got over it. At. All. Would not Go into her stall. If put in stall would canter perimeter. Would not eat. Stayed in the exact middle of her pasture so she could see all around her. Spooked at anything pig sized for a month after the pig left.

VERY noisy. For instance, If you think you are going to confine a pig somewhere for any reason, you are going to know ALL about how unhappy they are. So will your neighbors.

Pig broke out of three attempts to make a secure area.

I sent adorable pig home because there is NO WAY to know what horse will be a "no pig" horse, and I have visiting horses for clinics and haul in lessons, plus boarders and training horses. It wasn't worth getting sued because adorable pig caused a wreck.

If I didn't board or teach it would be different, but she was still super loud and very determined to muscle her way into or out of barriers.

FatCatFarm
Dec. 3, 2013, 12:53 PM
I tried it and the pig experiment was a fail here.

There were five horses on the property. Two never cared about the pig, two were terrified for about five days and got over it. One NEVER got over it. At. All. Would not Go into her stall. If put in stall would canter perimeter. Would not eat. Stayed in the exact middle of her pasture so she could see all around her. Spooked at anything pig sized for a month after the pig left.

VERY noisy. For instance, If you think you are going to confine a pig somewhere for any reason, you are going to know ALL about how unhappy they are. So will your neighbors.


Yep, that's what I needed to know. *Sigh* I really wish llamas/alpacas enjoyed being petted/groomed.