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View Full Version : fleece polo wraps -- proper application



staceyk
May. 12, 2011, 09:32 PM
I've never had much luck applying polo wraps but I got a great set as a gift -- colored eskadron wraps. Pardon these silly questions...
--My first attempt at wrapping I had too much left over (front legs), does anyone ever cut them down?
--Is it desired that the velcro tabs end at the same place on each leg (outside near top)?
-- I'd like to wrap under the fetlock joint and cross in the middle of the front of the fetlock --- I can't seem to do this! Here you can see the criss-cross ( http://www.classicequine.com/Images/Product%20Images/Classic%20Equine/Protective%20Boots/LG_POLOW4-SOLID.jpg )

This isn't rocket science, but it feels like rocket science. Help!

ET's Home
May. 12, 2011, 10:01 PM
Don't cut them down, unless you have a pony and horse sized wraps. Especially since those Eskradron's are about $60 per pair!

Start just below the knee, go down to the fetlock and back up once. You may have to overlap a little more if your horse has shorter or narrow cannon bones. I think the Pony Club manual had a great explanation on how to do it to get the V evenly in front. Some people don't go that low below the fetlock, I do to create a sling below the suspensory. I don't worry about where the velcro ends up, as long as the pressure is consistent. Don't put tension across the back of the leg, across the tendons.

Just keep practicing - you'll get it!

ET

joiedevie99
May. 12, 2011, 10:07 PM
You need to practice daily for a few weeks. It will come.

Ditto reading the pony club instructions. You may even find them online.

Start on the inside of the leg, and bring the wrap in front of the cannon bone first, towards the outside, then back around the tendons. Your first turn should be a circle. After that, you start going down overlapping 2/3-1/2 of the last turn. That means you advance down the leg about 1/2 a wrap width each time around the leg. Focus on keeping the pressure constant, but never pull against the tendon.

The v just takes practice. If you try to make the V too steep, you will either end up with a gappy bandage at the back, that you have to wrap over and cause wrinkles (which caused uneven pressure), or you will not overlap enough in the back and a gap in the wrap will appear once you start riding.

staceyk
May. 12, 2011, 10:19 PM
Hi,

I read a couple of sites (have to look for the pony club pp) and hadn't realized that you wrap the v two times. That will make a difference :-).

MunchingonHay
May. 12, 2011, 10:22 PM
have someone help you, and teach you how and then watch you do it. if the pressure is uneven it can cause bows, too loose it can slip. it takes practice, practice, practice....

ideayoda
May. 13, 2011, 02:15 AM
The way they are showed in the pix is going down to the fetlock at back up, that is how a standing bandage is put on, not a working one....that is why you have sooo much bandage. A working bandage is 'figure 8'/working bandage in application (can be seen in a pony club bandage). The right bandage is put on clockwise, and the left counter clockwise. Any tension pulling it tighter is across the bony on the front. But you go slightly down (when starting at the top) and then slightly back up. It looks like a series of x crosses, once down/covering the inside of the ankle then you can spiral back up. Have someone (a vet) teach you if need be. You do NOT go to the fetlock, but only the inside of the ankle.

CFFarm
May. 13, 2011, 01:40 PM
The way they are showed in the pix is going down to the fetlock at back up, that is how a standing bandage is put on, not a working one....that is why you have sooo much bandage. A working bandage is 'figure 8'/working bandage in application (can be seen in a pony club bandage). The right bandage is put on clockwise, and the left counter clockwise. Any tension pulling it tighter is across the bony on the front. But you go slightly down (when starting at the top) and then slightly back up. It looks like a series of x crosses, once down/covering the inside of the ankle then you can spiral back up. Have someone (a vet) teach you if need be. You do NOT go to the fetlock, but only the inside of the ankle.

Race trackers always go down and around the fetlock on their working bandages in case of rundowns. Dressage trainers don't (I guess there's not much chance of rundowns).

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
May. 13, 2011, 02:06 PM
Um, yes, I have cut the fronts. My mare is 16 h and relatively fine-boned. There are several nice wraps (Dover makes one) that come as 9 ft for the front and 11 ft for the hind, which is perfect.

CHT
May. 13, 2011, 02:16 PM
When I polo wrap I:
- Go horizontally across the tendon, and only angle up or down across the cannon.
- Go just to the ergot, any lower and I find they are likely to slip out of position.
- Layer closer toether on the fronts than the hinds.
- Always finish at the top.

Kyzteke
May. 13, 2011, 03:36 PM
white there are some guidelines, there is no ONE right way. Depends on use.

As an ex-polo groom, I do consider myself a bit of an expert, since when I worked for the pro team on game day, I'd be putting on some 24 sets :eek:!

For polo, we would start just below the knee, but leave a "tail" hanging out at the top. Then you would go down, (always wrapping from inside leg back to the outside, keeping tension even) do a cross at the fetlock, then lay the "tail" down across the back of the tendon, THEN wrap back up again.

That would give the tendon alittle more protection in case it got whacked by a mallet or ball.

For dressage, you probably don't need the tail OR the cross at the fetlock, although the latter will give a bit more support.

And yes, you should (ideally) end up with the velcro near the top (at least the top third of the leg) and always on the outside.

Don't be afraid to put some tension on them as you wrap, because it would really take some yanking by the average female to cause damage, especially with a new set of wraps. Just make sure when you "pull" you are pulling when the wrap is crossing the front on the cannon bone, and NOT on the back (on the tendon).

More important is to keep the tension even, making sure the wrap is smooth and wrinkle-free and overlap each turn.

How much you overlap depends on the length of each horse's cannon bone, and that's where the experience comes in...lots of trial & error.

And, as I'm sure has been mentioned, when you roll 'em back up, start with them "inside out" -- in other words, start rolling at the velco end and roll it inwards.

Elegante E
May. 13, 2011, 03:41 PM
Just and FYI, but Hilary Clayton DVM, has done a study on wraps and over heating tendons. Just beware that it can be a problem, especially in warm weather but even in cooler. Tendons need to cool off, exposing them to air is the best way. We see a lot of ligament issues with dressage horses as this may be part of it.

Sure use wraps when you are at a clinic but for every day it is best to ride without them.

Kryswyn
May. 13, 2011, 03:44 PM
Thank God for Kyzteke because now I don't have to explain running the 'tail' down the tendon after the downward wrapping and covering it with the upward winding. :D

Yes I, too, was a polo groom, but I also think it's a good thing in any discipline. It's never wrong to provide extra protection for a tendon.

chancellor2
May. 13, 2011, 03:47 PM
Thank God for Kyzteke because now I don't have to explain running the 'tail' down the tendon after the downward wrapping and covering it with the upward winding. :D

Yes I, too, was a polo groom, but I also think it's a good thing in any discipline. It's never wrong to provide extra protection for a tendon.


Except that I believe it has been proven that polo wraps do nothing to provide support to the tendons. They will protect from a rap against it but no real support.

ideayoda
May. 13, 2011, 04:44 PM
Bandages are not for support, they are to protect against rubs/hits (esp in lateral work), but w/o figure 8 they can slip. Just spiraling down and back up should only be used around (heavy) cottons, and easily slip if used with polos.

Kyzteke
May. 13, 2011, 05:37 PM
Except that I believe it has been proven that polo wraps do nothing to provide support to the tendons. They will protect from a rap against it but no real support.

They aren't supposed to support it. As I mentioned, the "tail" is for protection.

staceyk
May. 13, 2011, 07:49 PM
The tail is a great idea for protection and to use up "extra" wraps -- thanks!

As to "support" I have trouble thinking that any bandage or boot does more than protect from being whacked with a mallet or the opposite hoof.

lorilu
May. 13, 2011, 08:30 PM
As a way to start out:
When you wrap, count how many "arounds" you get. Then, see where the velcro winds up. THen, divide the number of "arounds" by two, and slightly adjust the starting point to get the velcro in a safe place.

I get 5 down the leg, # 6 around the fetlock, and the next 5 up the leg.

You can adjust the # of wraps by adjusting the degree of overlap, but be sure you overlap enough but not too much.

L

Carol Ames
May. 13, 2011, 08:39 PM
polos provide little, if any :no:protection against a "rap" I have seen polos sliced:eek: through by a shod hoof; thus, I would never gallop or jump in them :no:

Carol Ames
May. 13, 2011, 08:45 PM
This has been one of my objections to Sports Medicine boots; take them off a horse and notice how wet from sweat:eek: the leg is, in addition, the horses go better without them; Just and FYI, but Hilary Clayton DVM, has done a study on wraps and over heating tendons. Just beware that it can be a problem, especially in warm weather but even in cooler. Tendons need to cool off, exposing them to air is the best way. We see a lot of ligament issues with dressage horses as this may be part of it.

Kyzteke
May. 13, 2011, 09:26 PM
polos provide little, if any :no:protection against a "rap" I have seen polos sliced:eek: through by a shod hoof; thus, I would never gallop or jump in them :no:

Well, you better tell 1,000's of polo players that, 'cause that's what they use.

And I assure you, they ARE galloping when they play the game.;)

Perhaps that's why they still use polos, because they are much more absorbant and flexible than anything else I know of.

And if you put them on right, they won't move. You can imagine the danger if one came lose during a game, so we learned to put them on well. First time one of your polos came lose, you had to buy the team a case of beer. Next time, your butt was out the door......

I wouldn't trust them for cross country or going through water, but I've put them on my horses for jumping (free jumping through a chute) all the time....but then again, as I said, I've literally put on thousands of sets....

As far as heat, the average pony plays an 7 min. chukker, mostly at a gallop (depending on the level of play); Unless the player told you otherwise, you kept the wraps on in case he needed to play the horse again, so those horses were standing in bandages for several hours.

And many endurance riders use splint-type boots and ride some 50-100 miles in them, although they DO often pull them and hose the tendons down during vet checks.

mojo7777
May. 14, 2011, 06:47 PM
Double the V at the bottom and double at the top make it work for my horse who has short, slim cannons.

Carol Ames
May. 15, 2011, 09:17 PM
New polos look so fat and soft;); but, given that they do NOT s;)upport the leg; personally I think that a horse who, needs support;) should not be :no: being ridden anyway; they, the wraps should then protect from being rapped:eek: by another leg; it is frightening how easily:sadsmile::( a shod foot cuts through materials intended to protect; polo wraps, hampa boots; and, I am sure more;
After I saw a hoof landing over a fence on wet grass at Upperville slash through a :eek:hampa boot and a tendendon at Upperville; I bought an expensive pair:eek: of leather open fronts with a thick leather piece down the back; from that day on I always wore them when jumping remember” Prevention is the best cure!:yes::cry:” after I saw a living tendon:eek: once, I was determined to NEVER:no: see it again

vanraf
May. 16, 2011, 04:15 AM
here's a PDF written by a pony clubber for polocrosse, but the "how to" applies to polo wrapping for any discipline :)

http://www.polocrosse.ponyclub.org/pdfs/Lesson%20Plans/All%20Levels%20Lower%20Leg%20Protection%20for%20Eq uine.pdf

the "how to" starts on the second page and includes photos

CatOnLap
May. 17, 2011, 02:25 PM
Having seen enough "scalping" on the polowraps of my green horses, I do like to wrap with polos for dressage training. It is better for a hoof to scalp or slice the bandage than the bare hide, and a well wrapped polo with the so called suspensory sling ( does nothing but anchor the bandage and cover more skin) protects more area than those decorative fleece boots everyone seems to have become fond of. Most of the scalps I've seen are a result of hind hoof overtracking and hitting the back of the front fetlock, or on the inside of the fetlock on either fronts or hinds when training lateral work. Those fleece boots will not protect those areas at all. Why do people put them on? Fashion?