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View Full Version : Show facility being used as horse evacuation site....



Boomer
May. 11, 2011, 07:34 PM
I'm entered in a USDF dressage show this weekend in Memphis. Due to the flooding, the facility the show is being held at waived their coggins requirement since it was an emergancy.

The show organizers say that no horses are on the grounds (or will be accepted now) without their coggins.

My vet said there is "risk" (of course) since EIA is mosquito/fly transmitted, but there is also respiratory risk.

Would you go to this show? I am really nervous about it and am leaning towards not going unless they move it to another facility...

Has anyone been in this boat?

Bogey2
May. 11, 2011, 07:40 PM
a coggins is only as good as the day it is drawn right? Some states require 6 months, others 1 year....It was 2 years for the longest time.

Tiki
May. 11, 2011, 08:30 PM
I'm not sure I understand your question.

Are you saying that
1.there are no horses there but you are afraid of getting EIA?
Or are you saying that
2. there MAY be horses at the showgrounds who may or may not have proof of Coggins alongside the horses there for the show?
If 1, no worries, if 2, are they going to stabled together or will the flood horses be kept on another part of the showgrounds?

Just what is the incidence and prevalence of EIA in that area anyway? What are the normal Coggins requirements? I assume none of these are wild horses, is there any real reason to believe any of these horses could have EIA.

Getting answers to these questions may help ease your mind or make you decide to cancel.

If this is not an area with a high incidence/prevalence rate, like some others are, it shouldn't be a problem.

flyracing
May. 11, 2011, 08:50 PM
The respiratory risk is the same at all other shows (unless they are specifically bring in sick animals for care). Having a coggins test does absolutely nothing to prevent or diagnose a respiratory ailment.

Now, in terms of EIA, it is extremely rare today. It is also true that having a coggins does not show a horse is free of infection, but was not infected at that point. The most dangerous horses are those not showing symptoms due to the early stage of the disease and may be as likely in a horse that had his coggins 6 month ago as a horse that didn't have one. Also consider, most of these flood horses probably have had coggins, but they didn't all get their coggins with them in the evacution. It is also possible every horse there does have a coggins, but they are making the exception in case someone needs to save their horse.

Prevention: this is a mosquito born illness. In a time of high risk, use spray with deet and keep them covered in a fly sheet (not a scrim sheet- too thin). If they don't get bit by an infected mosquito, you can surround your horse with all the EIA horses in the world and your horse will be just fine.

Good luck at the show. Be safe trailering and riding; those are much higher risks!!

Boomer
May. 11, 2011, 09:27 PM
Thanks - found out that during the evacuation, the coggins requirement had been waived, however, all horses that have come into the facility did have a coggins.

The horses are all stabled around the area that the show horses will be in... close enough that if a horse were sick (whether show horse or evacuee) it could be passed around.

But.. I'm thinking the risk is low. I don't know what the prevailance of EIA in Memphis. I would think that with the tremendous amount of water around the south (and thus the high skeeter population) that it *might* be more at risk.

Underthebridge
May. 12, 2011, 12:20 PM
This is my experience, EIA is not unusual,
if one test positive in a herd does not mean the others will, if it was easily spread I would not bother keeping horses.

since most of my neighbors do not test, I try to keep the exposure to flying insects low, I wish they would expand the testing.

Boomer
May. 12, 2011, 02:11 PM
This is my experience, EIA is not unusual,
if one test positive in a herd does not mean the others will, if it was easily spread I would not bother keeping horses.

since most of my neighbors do not test, I try to keep the exposure to flying insects low, I wish they would expand the testing.

I usually bring my boy's fly sheet and box fan and lots of fly spray to shows. The south is a tough one for bugs.

I'm sure most of my neighbors don't test. There's a horse that got loose a while ago - older stallion - which couldn't be haltered by anyone, so I'm sure he hasn't been tested.

Mardi
May. 12, 2011, 11:48 PM
Would you go to this show? I am really nervous about it and am leaning towards not going unless they move it to another facility...



I think you just answered your own question.

Do what gives you peace of mind.

JB
May. 13, 2011, 08:12 AM
This is my experience, EIA is not unusual,
EIA in the US is VERY unusual these days, thanks in large part to the testing


if one test positive in a herd does not mean the others will, if it was easily spread I would not bother keeping horses.
You're right, it's not highly transmittable, but with all the water, with the warming temps (not sure what it's been like over the last couple of weeks, but I see today is 80, very similar to our weather) I would be concerned about enough mosquitoes and allllllll the horse real estate in close quarters. Now, granted, that particular issue isn't any different from a large show, and the fact that all horses so far have presented negative papers, makes it just like a large show.

So, so far, it doesn't sound any different from a big show environment. The difference would be people may have been forced to bring less than healthy horses there, whereas they wouldn't bring them to a show.

If your horse is up to date on vaccinations, then EIA wouldn't stop me from going.