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Churchill Hunt Club
May. 7, 2011, 12:02 AM
Turfway Park
Turfway president Bob Elliston on the future of racing. How do you think racing can become "major league"?
Elliston: 'Major League' Mindset Needed
www.bloodhorse.com
Horse racing needs to take a "major league" approach in order to increase economic opportunities and spur investment, National Thoroughbred Racing Association executive chairman Bob Elliston said May 4.
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Laurierace
May. 7, 2011, 12:06 AM
It's better than a holiday. It's a Saturday.

Churchill Hunt Club
May. 7, 2011, 12:13 AM
A Saturday and a holiday.. Ill skip the mint juelops. I like my cabernate\ Ill be at keenland all day

Dun Ciarain
May. 7, 2011, 12:43 AM
The Kentucky Derby is already on a Saturday.

Horse Racing was already "Major League" in the 1930's, 1940's & 1950's. Horse racing was big, while football and basketball were minor sports by comparison.

Madeline
May. 7, 2011, 08:49 AM
The Kentucky Derby is already on a Saturday.

Horse Racing was already "Major League" in the 1930's, 1940's & 1950's. Horse racing was big, while football and basketball were minor sports by comparison.

Get rid of the drugs, give the bettor an even break. Do not spend all national TV exposure talking about food and hats...

Of those, probably getting rid of the drugs is the most important.Nobody wants to get emotionally involved with chemically enhanced animals.

Churchill Hunt Club
May. 7, 2011, 11:10 AM
Since eight bells they are all tested for drugs. No more drugs... The thoroughbred racing commission is very strict... I love racing because it was around during this countries toughest times. Seabiscut gave this country hope. This sport (The sport of Kings) Has been here to give this country hope...and has helped strengthen this country during the depression.
I have been around these horses in their workouts and daily lives. I went and galloped on the track to learn more of their lives. I was amazed of how good these race horses live. The care they get is the best I have ever seen in any of the industries... The knolledge is incredible that these trainers,Grooms and Vets have... I learned more in one year than I ever had learned anywhere else...
The Races are good enough for the queen of england and many other famous people...

evntr5218
May. 7, 2011, 11:40 AM
they have been drug tested long before eight bells and correct me if im wrong but she was never found to have any drugs in her system.
and actually they are allowed to be run on an approved amount of anti bleeding medication such as lasix in the us.
they are not allowed to run on any medication at all in europe.

Madeline
May. 7, 2011, 01:36 PM
Since eight bells they are all tested for drugs. No more drugs... The thoroughbred racing commission is very strict... I love racing because it was around during this countries toughest times. .

My. You're out of the loop. They almost all run on Lasix, the anti-bleeding medication which probably boosts performance and may mask other drugs. Many also run on Bute.
Yes,they are tested for legal levels of these drugs, but they ain't running on oats, hay, and water, either.

Do a little research on the status of US racing on the world scene, and on the effect of the current drug policy on # of starts per year, or per career.

No more drugs? What are you smoking?

On the Farm
May. 7, 2011, 02:48 PM
My. You're out of the loop. They almost all run on Lasix, the anti-bleeding medication which probably boosts performance and may mask other drugs. Many also run on Bute.
Yes,they are tested for legal levels of these drugs, but they ain't running on oats, hay, and water, either.

Do a little research on the status of US racing on the world scene, and on the effect of the current drug policy on # of starts per year, or per career.

No more drugs? What are you smoking?

Alot of reasons exist as to why horses make fewer starts nowadays without relying on the largely uproven medication correlation. Two immediate examples from this last week-- I spoke with a trainer who entered a horse in a suitable spot for seven weeks last summer. Each time the racing secretary selected other races to fill out the card, so this horse stayed in the barn. This circumstance is quite common and had nothing to do with drugs. Same as for one I'm associated with on today's card--nothing suitable in the book, so he was entered MTO in a turf race. The race stayed on the turf, so he stays in the barn. Nothing to do with drugs.

Regarding Lasix, I'm continually amazed at the number of people who would prefer to place a horse's health at risk by denying the animal a legitimate medication that could lesson the probability or severity of EIPH. Cruelty knows no bounds with some folks, I guess.

Madeline
May. 7, 2011, 03:19 PM
Regarding Lasix, I'm continually amazed at the number of people who would prefer to place a horse's health at risk by denying the animal a legitimate medication that could lesson the probability or severity of EIPH. Cruelty knows no bounds with some folks, I guess.

Before we get too deep into why I'm a heartless bitch, let's take a moment to look at the big picture. Before the use of LAsix became widespread and legal in the '70's, a horse that bled was immediately out of the gene pool and into a less strenuous activity. We're now well into our fourth decade of breeding bleeders. In a perfect world there would be no need to "place a horse's health at risk by denying the animal a legitimate medication that could lesson the probability or severity of EIPH" because those horses would never have been bred in the first place. One could make a good argument that lasix has led to the devaluation of the American TB both here and abroad.

And your justification for raceday use of Bute would be?

On the Farm
May. 7, 2011, 08:54 PM
Before we get too deep into why I'm a heartless bitch, let's take a moment to look at the big picture. Before the use of LAsix became widespread and legal in the '70's, a horse that bled was immediately out of the gene pool and into a less strenuous activity. We're now well into our fourth decade of breeding bleeders. In a perfect world there would be no need to "place a horse's health at risk by denying the animal a legitimate medication that could lesson the probability or severity of EIPH" because those horses would never have been bred in the first place. One could make a good argument that lasix has led to the devaluation of the American TB both here and abroad.

And your justification for raceday use of Bute would be?

I'll respond to the last question first. I read, then reread, my previous post and nowhere did I support the use of raceday bute. I resent your implication that I do support it. I think regulations such as those in New York are reasonable.

Continuing on Lasix, horses have been suffering from EIPH for well over 100 years and simply declaring that if we don't administer this or that then the problem will genetically straighten itself out is not supported by any science that I'm aware of. One thing that has changed is our ability to detect bleeding. We've learned that a two nostril gusher is not the only time a horse suffers from EIPH. Even a small amount of blood deep in the lungs can be potentially fatal and I don't mind protecting a horse with lasix. Given that, regulations DO exist to remove visible bleeders from racing, usually after the third occurance.