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JackSprats Mom
Apr. 25, 2011, 09:09 PM
So I posted before that I'm having an issue getting my fence hot, charger is hot, but very little goes to fence and then it peters out to nothing...
Added 4 ground rods one 6ft and all the way in others are probably 4 foot in, ground is VERY wet. Nothing is touching the fence.

Here are photo's of the set up...http://community.webshots.com/album/580104604PTnuOJ

If anyone has any idea pls let me know :)

Thanks

ReSomething
Apr. 25, 2011, 09:22 PM
DH doesn't use wire nuts to splice the hot lead to the Eb rope or wire. He uses these things from the Eb people http://www.tractorsupply.com/electric-fencing/electric-fence-insulators/electrobraid-trade-horse-fence-copper-split-bolt-connector-pack-of-10-3608378 or these things from Tractor Supply. http://www.tractorsupply.com/electric-fencing/electric-fence-hardware-accessories/zareba-electric-fence-line-clamp-3-pack-3607607 (those zareba things are actually a lot prettier than what he uses, which look like ugly galvanized spiders)

Wire nuts just don't cut it out in the great outdoors.

Apart from that I sit outside in the evening watching and listening for sparking. I never see things in the daylight but they show up quick in the dark and then a little weedeater work or whatever solves the problem.

Trinity3205
Apr. 25, 2011, 09:27 PM
I have had the same problems before. I had a three mile solar charger that wasnt working well on that white rope fenceing. It was WAY less than half the milage the box was rated for and was getting very little to no shock. I bought a bigger 10 mile plug in charger and never have a problem now. I have found that with that rope stuff, you need more umph in the box for it to really carry a good charge.

Also, you can have broken the wire threads on down the line in places and it will get a weaker shock also. I like the white rope's visibility, but for good shock, I like plain wire or the thin yellow and black rope from TSC. It carrys and delivers a good shock and can be tied for a splice instead of the metal splicers. Much more reliable than the big white rope to deliver a shock.

Also agree about the wire nuts...Not realiable enough for the outside and they corrode. You need a real splicer.

sk_pacer
Apr. 25, 2011, 09:28 PM
I'm better you don't have a good connection to that rope. Wire caps don't always make a good connection unless you are connecting like to like. I would think you have to penetrate the rope with your hot line and then clamp it.........i may be wrong but, worth a shot

JackSprats Mom
Apr. 25, 2011, 09:32 PM
Had tried different splicing methods with the rope and it made no difference (so currently have the cap on as the wire isn't 'hot').

Trouble with the broken wire theory is that the current is weak enough at the attachement point that I can stand there and hold it and not feel anything but a VERY slight buzz.

The charger is a PW 1000 which should be WAY over what is needed as i disconnected the other feild from it so it is only covering 1/2 acre.

Maybe I just have a bad charger???

This thing is driving me nuts.

The line is absolutely clear from the fence and any vegetation.

Kate66
Apr. 25, 2011, 11:20 PM
You don't have it plugged in!

<Just joking - was looking at 1st photo> :-)

foggybok
Apr. 26, 2011, 01:48 AM
You don't have it plugged in!

<Just joking - was looking at 1st photo> :-)

ha ha, I was thinking the same thing! :)

Sounds like a connection issue or perhaps bad insulators so you are losing charge

Frank B
Apr. 26, 2011, 08:04 AM
Ditto using split bolt connectors instead of wire nuts. Incidentally, $26 for a pack of 10 is a very good price compared to most electrical distributors.

I'm suspicious of the charger, though. Some failures will cause them to test good with no load, but put out low voltage when connected to a fence.

Here's a good manual (http://parmakusa.com/Install/Parmak_Energizer_Booklet_English.pdf) to download and print out, especially the first five pages dealing with grounding.

airhorse
Apr. 26, 2011, 08:41 AM
Get rid of that house wire and wire nuts, get your ground rods 8' into the ground, check all you connections. Get a fence tester and check the output directly from the unit.

JackSprats Mom
Apr. 26, 2011, 12:01 PM
Get rid of that house wire and wire nuts, get your ground rods 8' into the ground, check all you connections. Get a fence tester and check the output directly from the unit.

with the exception of the 8' ground rods (all they had locally was 6') I've done the rest of that, just haven't replaced the wire nut as it didn't work before or after so....

I have another charger somewhere so think maybe I should run that and see...

Thanks for the idea's keep em coming and thanks for the manual will download it and read through it this weekend.

*sigh* who would have thought electric fencing would be such a pain.
:no:

emaren
Apr. 26, 2011, 12:29 PM
I'm not that great with the connectors, I just bought what horseguard had. I also bought a ground rod kit from valleyvet that came with instructions. There were three 6 ft ground rods (to set 10' apart) and 40ft of wire and the ground rod connector clamps. Anyway the surprising thing about the instructions is that they tell you to dig a trench from your charger out 20' where you are going to set the ground rods. They say to pound the ground rods in to a depth of 4-6" below the surface. Connect your wire to the ground rods and run the wire to the other ground rods. When it's all set up, fill your trench back in and everything is underground. Mine has worked great this way. In fact it's a solar charger and during the day when the suns out there is so much power going through the tape that you can hear it whizzing back and forth in the tape. My horse jumps a mile anytime the fence cracks, he's terrified.

airhorse
Apr. 26, 2011, 12:39 PM
Well phooey...

I would still check the output straight from the terminals on the unit. Either a tester or unsuspecting neighbor kid will work:eek:

StGermain
Apr. 26, 2011, 12:53 PM
What kind of meter are you using to test with? I use this (http://www.tractorsupply.com/fencing/electric-fencing/electric-fence-hardware-accessories/digital-electric-fence-voltage-tester-3600134) which gives me a digital reading of the voltage.

If you disconnect your fence from the wire that goes to it, is the wire hot? How many volts?

If you have voltage through the wire, do you have any gates set up in your hotwire? If so, disconnect it at the gate - are you getting voltage to that point? each step you can eliminate helps you to pinpoint where your drain is.

Finally, do you have a neighbor with hotwire who can come out and look at it with you. Nothing's better than eperienced eyes.

Good luck,

StG

wsmoak
Apr. 26, 2011, 01:02 PM
Here's a good manual (http://parmakusa.com/Install/Parmak_Energizer_Booklet_English.pdf) to download and print out, especially the first five pages dealing with grounding.

Slight digression... Is this the brand of charger you recommend? I need one for 250 ft of garden fence (2 wires at first, plus another run of tape if the deer become a problem.)

And another for paddocks I'm contemplating in the open wooded area -- but I'll probably just get that all from Horseguard.

Flying Hill
Apr. 26, 2011, 07:11 PM
Is the insulated cable you've used to connect to the fence (and ground) specifically for electric fence, or is it household? This is why:

"The cable that carries the electric pulse from the charger to the fence needs to be specifically for electric fence, with insulation rated for up to 20,000 volts (most fence chargers emit from 5000 to 10,000 volts)–the same degree of insulation as on automobile spark plugs. By using cable designed for electric fence, you avoid the electricity leakage that results when you connect the charger to the fence with heavy-duty household electric cable, whose insulation is rated for only 600 volts." (other useful stuff at: http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch/fencing/electricfence_021005)

But, I think that your main problem is that your charger is not strong enough. The mileage ratings on chargers only apply to *one* 12-14 guage *wire* with *no* interference. When used with electric rope, the efficiency drops to 1/10th (or maybe 1/6th? I couldn't find the reference), so a 5-mile charger will only work for about 1/2 mile. Not only that, but the smaller wires in the rope allow more leakage, so you need a *much* stronger output (in joules) from the charger to have a strong shock on the rope. I think for a small paddock, a minimum of a 5-joule charger is needed with rope. ( I researched this all heavily last year when I was having a similar problem, but since I can't find the source, forgive me if my numbers are a little off.)

Anyway, the best solution is to get the strongest charger you can afford, use insulated cable and connectors specifically made for electric fence, and wherever you tie your rope in, make sure all the wires (6 or 8 usually) in the rope have contact with the power.

Good luck!

JackSprats Mom
Apr. 26, 2011, 09:09 PM
Product Features Joule Rating: 1.0
Acres Controlled: 1 to 100 Acres
Standard Mileage: 1 to 25 Standard Miles of Wire
Recommended for:
• Small Areas
• Small Animals
• Horses
• Cattle

Hmmm so you don't think this is enough for an acre? (ideally I want 11 acres done but its only set up on one side of the one acre paddock right now). It makes sense though as there are 6-8 wires in the rope....hmmmm

Frank B
Apr. 26, 2011, 10:28 PM
Slight digression... Is this the brand of charger you recommend? I need one for 250 ft of garden fence (2 wires at first, plus another run of tape if the deer become a problem.)

And another for paddocks I'm contemplating in the open wooded area -- but I'll probably just get that all from Horseguard.
Parmak is a good brand. Their manual is one of the best I've seen for illustrating grounding techniques for low conductivity soil.

A couple of handfuls of Copper Sulfate crystals placed in a hole around the top of each ground rod will often increase conductivity. Water it liberally so it will disperse into the soil, then back-fill with the soil from the hole. Check with your Vet. It's often used for treating hooves.

Here's a map of US soil conductivity. (http://www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/m3/index.html) The higher the number, the better the conductivity.

Deer are pretty good jumpers, especially if there's something tasty on the other side of the fence.