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View Full Version : Resource for getting rid of you manure pile



subk
Apr. 22, 2011, 06:43 PM
Just stumbled on this thread on a garden forum. You can practically see these gardeners salivating: http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/soil/msg0218131810240.html?15

Instead of a horseless rider/riderless horse thread maybe we need to have a manure-less gardener/manure-full rider thread. :)

coloredcowhorse
Apr. 22, 2011, 07:44 PM
Just stumbled on this thread on a garden forum. You can practically see these gardeners salivating: http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/soil/msg0218131810240.html?15

Instead of a horseless rider/riderless horse thread maybe we need to have a manure-less gardener/manure-full rider thread. :)

I have a couple piles going...one is two years old, one is one year old and I just started a new one for this year. I'll pull what I want out of the older one and put the remainder on Craigslist...have had people pay $100 a pickup load for it and drive over 100 miles from Reno to get. Next year the new pile will go where the 3 year old pile is now. Just rotate them. Gardeners will KILL for well composted manure along with old hay etc.

theoldgreymare
Apr. 22, 2011, 10:46 PM
We trade ours (in any format....fresh, composted) with a local garden supply company for sand and mulch. Every now and then we get a local person who asks for some for their garden. More than happy to give them a bed load (or ten). In exchange they give us (without being asked!): fresh vegetables and fruit, fresh fish, more venison than we could ever eat and, most recently, the daily paper! I am starting to like this!

Mukluk
Apr. 22, 2011, 11:30 PM
There's gold in that thar shit!!!

BigHorseLittleHorse
Apr. 23, 2011, 01:55 PM
We live near mushroom country, so a mushroom farmer comes and takes ours a couple of times a year. They will only take manure and straw, though - no shavings.

sar2008
Apr. 26, 2011, 11:29 AM
Do you guys know if people will take it with shavings and hay mixed in?

Nes
Apr. 26, 2011, 03:16 PM
Do you guys know if people will take it with shavings and hay mixed in?

Yes people will, no people who know what they are doing will not.

Shavings don't add anything to the garden :S. If you can get your manure relatively clean or the shavings have already started to break down that's fine.

Gardeners will also kill for well rotten cow manure - I got some from the neighbour last year and these bed won't need anything more for YEARS. I had a really super harvest too :)

subk
Apr. 26, 2011, 05:14 PM
Yes people will, no people who know what they are doing will not.

Shavings don't add anything to the garden :S. If you can get your manure relatively clean or the shavings have already started to break down that's fine.
For stuff to properly compost it needs both "greens" (manure) and "browns" (shavings, straw, pellets etc.) So actually the shavings/straw/pellets are important in the whole process and I would think preferable to straight manure. (At least that's what I've been picking up reading these garden/soil/compost forums. :) ) Some people actually use the compost as mulch and in those applications the partially broken down shavings can be quite useful.

Gardeners are not unlike horse people: 2 gardeners 3 opinions.

invinoveritas
Apr. 26, 2011, 05:19 PM
You guys should read the thread on the 2 bodies found in a manure pile in Gary, Indiana.

You "could" put a few pesky neighbors or relatives in your pile, then "discover" them and call the cops and have it all removed to the crime lab for sifting for evidence.

coloredcowhorse
Apr. 26, 2011, 05:34 PM
Do you guys know if people will take it with shavings and hay mixed in?

Around here our soil is so poor (10000 yr old alkali lake bed... very very fine clay particles for the most part) that ANY organic matter is more than welcome. Several years ago (previous place...three houses on an old ranch) I built a bed that was 20 feet wide and 120 long. Tilled up one layer of dirt, spread about 3-4 inches of composted cow/horse manure on it, tilled that in and then shoveled out 3 foot wide paths by putting removed dirt on top of beds between paths. Since the soil is clay and turns just nasty when wet I then went to the local pallet manufacturing company and got free shavings form them and laid down about 4-6 inches in all the pathways. Good garden that year. The next year one of the other renters got a wild hair and ripped the entire area with a tractor tiller so the shavings (half rotted by then) got mixed in....I redid my part with paths and beds and got out of the way....everything grew like a bad weed! Ground was working its way to nice loamy stuff with lots of organic stuff so didn't compact and held water nicely but drained as well. Did manure last year but didn't have time to do the same as before...redoing this year but beds will have sides to them and not just be mounded (rabbits!).

Nes
Apr. 26, 2011, 05:55 PM
Gardeners are not unlike horse people: 2 gardeners 3 opinions.

Very true, but shavings in the process of breaking down will actually rob your soil of nitrogen & too much pine will make it too acidic.

Too many browns in your compost can also keep it from heating up properly.

So you gotta be a good mucker to make good compost ;).

2DogsFarm
Apr. 27, 2011, 12:36 PM
Shavings don't add anything to the garden :S. If you can get your manure relatively clean or the shavings have already started to break down that's fine.

Errmmm... I beg to differ.
The first year I had my barn I took this question to a Garden show with a speaker from Purdue Dept of Ag.
PeoplE had told me I could not compost shavings.
He told me the opposite, that in fact the nitrogen from the urine in the shavings would help the compost process.
From the results - every Spring a pile of lovely dark loam - he was right.

My problem is living in an area where everyone seems to have easy access to compost : (
I left a flyer at a Master Gardeners Plant Sale a couple years ago offering free U-Haul compost & got no takers :no:
Of course, 4 new subdivisions have sprung up since then right down the road from me....
Maybe I'll post a sign out front this year ;)

jengersnap
Apr. 27, 2011, 03:09 PM
My hubby has taken to advertising on Kijiji for a 6 pack he'll load the composted stuff into the back of their trucks or trailers with his tractor. Gets quite a few takers! But I wish we had a good way to bring home the good stuff....the horses at the track are bedded on peat moss. Talk about black gold :winkgrin:

2DogsFarm
Apr. 27, 2011, 03:34 PM
But I wish we had a good way to bring home the good stuff....the horses at the track are bedded on peat moss. Talk about black gold :winkgrin:

Line trunk of car with heavy-duty tarp, fill heavy-duty contractors 30gal plastic bags with "stuff", tie or staple shut, bring home.

jengersnap
Apr. 27, 2011, 04:29 PM
Line trunk of car with heavy-duty tarp, fill heavy-duty contractors 30gal plastic bags with "stuff", tie or staple shut, bring home.

Great idea, but when I said bringing it home I meant its really not the transport so much as storing it at the track until there is enough for a load. Last time we parked a small trailer next to the dumpster as many in the barn used peat moss. It filled up fast. It was easier to dump into the low trailer then into the tall trash bins. Now everyone but us is on shavings. I just don't need any right now, but if someone would pay for it I would consider doing that again.