PDA

View Full Version : Wash Stall - Help/Ideas needed



sar2008
Apr. 20, 2011, 08:44 AM
Ok, so here's the deal. When the barn I was renting was built, the contractor that did the wash stall didn't do it with any slope for the water to drain. There is a drain hole, but everytime it's used water goes into the neighboring tack room.

I am trying to find a way for it to be useable. Here is what I am thinking:

*jack hammering all the concrete out, have dirt floors with gravel and mats. That way it just drains into the ground.

*adding an additional layer of concrete over the existing concrete at a minimal grade to allow water to drain in the middle

Has anyone ever had this problem? Any other ideas would be great :confused:

Gloria
Apr. 20, 2011, 11:11 AM
When I built my barn, the contractor put the slope "away" from the drain hole, which is at one end of the wall:mad:... Can't understand what they were thinking... Anyway, I got them back to put another layer over the existing concrete so it slopes properly. I think this will be your least expensive option. To bust out the existing concrete and rebuild it might be too expensive.

pds
Apr. 20, 2011, 11:19 AM
Could you rent one of those concrete grinder things and just add some slope to the drain?

LauraKY
Apr. 20, 2011, 11:39 AM
Mine doesn't slope at all. I put stall mats in, cut a hole for the drain (and kept the cutout...I plug it if I'm using the washstall for grooming or the farrier) and it seems to be draining fine. Except right now because the ground is so saturated, there is no where for the water to go. I have an outside wash stall too.

sar2008
Apr. 20, 2011, 03:15 PM
When I built my barn, the contractor put the slope "away" from the drain hole, which is at one end of the wall:mad:... Can't understand what they were thinking... Anyway, I got them back to put another layer over the existing concrete so it slopes properly. I think this will be your least expensive option. To bust out the existing concrete and rebuild it might be too expensive.

This is what I am thinking. I do AP at a concrete lock company, so I deat with concrete contractors all day ;) I was talking with one guy today that said he wouldn't put any LESS than 4 inches new over existing at a 1-1.5 inch slope. Anything less and it would crack.

Do you know how much your guy laid down?

sar2008
Apr. 20, 2011, 03:17 PM
Could you rent one of those concrete grinder things and just add some slope to the drain?

Thats a good idea...I am just not technical enough to even attempt to get the slope right....

sar2008
Apr. 20, 2011, 03:19 PM
Mine doesn't slope at all. I put stall mats in, cut a hole for the drain (and kept the cutout...I plug it if I'm using the washstall for grooming or the farrier) and it seems to be draining fine. Except right now because the ground is so saturated, there is no where for the water to go. I have an outside wash stall too.

Do have a gravel floor? Or is it concrete?

If it's gravel, you shouldn't need a slope because all the water soaks into the ground. Mine is cement, so it just site there...or in my case--leaks into the adjoining tack room :no:

katarine
Apr. 20, 2011, 04:35 PM
Yeah ummm me telling you my wash stall works, doesn't really help you, does it?

I would guess the concrete guys have it right, but dang that's a lot of concrete to add in. Could you perhaps pour just enough to create a sloped 'berm' as it were, along that tack room wall? so the water can't run 'uphill' and under the wall.

Gloria
Apr. 20, 2011, 04:41 PM
This is what I am thinking. I do AP at a concrete lock company, so I deat with concrete contractors all day ;) I was talking with one guy today that said he wouldn't put any LESS than 4 inches new over existing at a 1-1.5 inch slope. Anything less and it would crack.

Do you know how much your guy laid down?

4 inches over existing? Mine is like 1 inch over existing concrete at the tallest part... I have not noticed any problem. I think they had to do something to bind the new layer to the existing conrete though.

I think there might be a confusion here. You want at least 4 inches of concrete or it will crack, but that does not mean 4 inches over existing concrete...

Bluey
Apr. 20, 2011, 04:50 PM
Yeah ummm me telling you my wash stall works, doesn't really help you, does it?

I would guess the concrete guys have it right, but dang that's a lot of concrete to add in. Could you perhaps pour just enough to create a sloped 'berm' as it were, along that tack room wall? so the water can't run 'uphill' and under the wall.

I like that idea of a berm, but concrete doesn't adhere to old concrete easily, you will have to caulk along the edge.
Why not try caulking from the concrete to the wall of the tackroom, if that is the only place you have a problem leaking and maybe have some concrete company cut a few lines in the concrete from the hole to 2/3rds up, shallower as they go up, so the water may follow them into the drain?
That should not cost much and you can keep them sweeped clean easily.

I would see if the ones that poured that will make it good on their penny, that should not be your problem, unless you don't want to see them again, afraid they may mess things more.:(

Bluey
Apr. 20, 2011, 04:53 PM
4 inches over existing? Mine is like 1 inch over existing concrete at the tallest part... I have not noticed any problem. I think they had to do something to bind the new layer to the existing conrete though.

I think there might be a confusion here. You want at least 4 inches of concrete or it will crack, but that does not mean 4 inches over existing concrete...

All concrete will crack sooner or later, but I think 1" concrete over concrete and the weight of a horse will mean concrete that will crack quickly, too thin for that use.:eek:

Gloria
Apr. 20, 2011, 05:10 PM
All concrete will crack sooner or later, but I think 1" concrete over concrete and the weight of a horse will mean concrete that will crack quickly, too thin for that use.:eek:

That is why they did something to bind the old to the new one so the new layer isn't just "float" on top of the existing concrete. Can't remember the details but I vaguely remember they scraped off (buffed off?) a thin layer from the existing one, vacumed it clean, poured some kind of binding agent, and then pour the new layer of concrete. As far as I can tell, the new one is now part of the old one.

Bluey
Apr. 20, 2011, 05:14 PM
That is why they did something to bind the old to the new one so the new layer isn't just "float" on top of the existing concrete. Can't remember the details but I vaguely remember they scraped off (buffed off?) a thin layer from the existing one, vacumed it clean, poured some kind of binding agent, and then pour the new layer of concrete. As far as I can tell, the new one is now part of the old one.

That explains it, sounds like some good technique they are used to.
I was also wondering how they could put any reinforcing wire on just 1" thick.
There are some fiberglass they can add today to concrete to minimize cracking, we have some like that, but still needs to be treated like regular concrete.