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View Full Version : Grated Coconut ~ Champion Bucking Horse Retires!



Kyzteke
Apr. 18, 2011, 01:53 PM
Yes, they ARE sporthorses and apparently quite valuable ones.

Grated Coconut is a 6x champion bareback bucking stallion. His sire was a champion bucking horse, as was his dam and full sister.

GC has already produced a number of foals who are now top bucking horses as well -- so it seems "buck" is a trait that breeds true.

He will be retired to Calgary's "Born to Buck" breeding program.

GC is valued at $300,000!:eek:

Here is a link to an article with more info + a video of GC at work:
http://www.ponybox.com/news_details.php?title=A-Legend-Retires--The-Great-Grated-Cocount&id=1160

Enjoy!

Sugarbrook
Apr. 18, 2011, 02:09 PM
WOW, what a thrill he is to watch. Thanks for posting this video of a great one, with a kind disposition to match his bucking ability!!

RyuEquestrian
Apr. 18, 2011, 03:36 PM
Wow, that is pretty impressive!

RacetrackReject
Apr. 18, 2011, 03:51 PM
A friend of mine from high school married a guy who is a stock contractor and part of the groom's gift from another stock contractor was semen from a horse named, I think, Applejack. He was a bucking horse of the year or some such and they sold breedings to him at the NFR one year. I believe it cost around $10k for the breeding.
They have now switched over to bulls exclusively and have a genetic banking and selling firm for bucking bulls (http://www.exclusivegenetics.com/), and they also run Bucks by Design where they sell custom embryos or make the cross you want via ET with a recipient herd.

RougeEmpire
Apr. 18, 2011, 04:51 PM
He is known for having an wonderful temperment and breing great to handle on the ground too! Not to mention steller conformation and through the roof lifetime earnings! Yes stud fees on the TOP bucking stock can go make Moorlands Totilas stud fee look like pocket change!

tradewind
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:11 PM
I knew about the value of bucking bulls did not realize it also applied to bucking horses. In bulls it is most definitely genetic so I am sure it could be in horses as well. Fascinating, thanks for sharing.

Kyzteke
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:13 PM
Yeah, in my next life I want to come back as a top bucking horse stallion.:winkgrin:

Don't get started till you are four years old, work about 10 minutes total a year (and inbetween you get to hang out with mares & make babies), then retire at age 13 or so and get turned out on 22,000 acres to screw your brains out!!:yes:

All for being VERY good at something most of us horse people spend decades trying to breed OUT of our animals!!;)

I'm thinking Grated Coconut was a very, very good boy in his former live(s)!:lol::lol::lol:

buschkn
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:20 PM
What a cool horse, and an impressive athlete!

stoicfish
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:25 PM
http://www.myhorse.com/world-record-holding-bronc-airwolf-becomes-first-bucking-horse-cloned.html

Clone bucking...
These are Alberta people that own him.

Lots of talented breeders in Alberta...

Kyzteke
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:38 PM
http://www.myhorse.com/world-record-holding-bronc-airwolf-becomes-first-bucking-horse-cloned.html

Clone bucking...
These are Alberta people that own him.

Lots of talented breeders in Alberta...

Wow, that's a nice looking foal! There is obviously some serious $$ in good bucking stock.

And so much for PETA's theory that it's the flank strap that makes 'em buck....;)

RougeEmpire
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:42 PM
He's always been STUNNING!
http://horsebackmagazine.com/hb/archives/710
http://ontherodeoroad.com/2010/06/16/

Kyzteke
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:53 PM
He's always been STUNNING!
http://horsebackmagazine.com/hb/archives/710
http://ontherodeoroad.com/2010/06/16/

Well, I was talking about the Airwolf clone, but GC is a nice looking boy himself.

Not exactly a "modern" type, though, is he? Burly dude for sure. The "Western Horseman" article says he weighs about 1600#!

Lynnwood
Apr. 18, 2011, 06:03 PM
Whats also impressive was hearing the announcer say that his dam was bucking at that same rodeo and until his ride helping cowboys to arena records. I'm a little surprised after his fame they did not retire her to breeding full time as well.

RougeEmpire
Apr. 18, 2011, 06:10 PM
Well, I was talking about the Airwolf clone, but GC is a nice looking boy himself.

Not exactly a "modern" type, though, is he? Burly dude for sure. The "Western Horseman" article says he weighs about 1600#!

He has a lot of draft in him thats for sure! Yes the Airwolf clone is exceptional too. Im sure most show horses WISH they could be Top ranked bucking stock. High value rodeo horses have THE LIFE! They travel in groups, move in stock trailer, eat like kings, live in true herds and recieve the best of care without all the "fuss". Stock contracts with these horses spare no expense on their care and carefully map out the entire years events. No blankets, no stalls, no shoes, no clipping, no pulled manes, no braiding, no ulcers, no issues and no lunging :lol:

Its amazing how sound they stay and how LONG many of them keep working, its not uncommon for great bucking horse to work into it's late teens and retire sound as a dollar. Im sure GC could have kept working well into his later years but he has already proven himself, now he gets to retire and run his own harem of mares. Most of the stock contractors still use the time honered traditon of running mares and the stallion together, now days they also collect and ship semen too. How cool is that!

Kinsella
Apr. 18, 2011, 06:56 PM
It has always been my secret dream to breed bucking horses... They are so awesome!

Kyzteke
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:55 PM
It has always been my secret dream to breed bucking horses... They are so awesome!

Mine too! If I won the lottery, that's what I'd do.

Nancy!
Apr. 19, 2011, 12:56 AM
I recently had the pleasure of meeting Grated Coconut. What an impressive horse. I've seen him compete many times but to actually get to see and pet him. He is a big suck that loves to get scratched behind his ears.

He was quite the star while at the vets getting collected. And yes, you could really tell that he was horribly abused. ;) (Sarcasm here!)

Nancy!

Kyzteke
Apr. 19, 2011, 11:48 AM
I recently had the pleasure of meeting Grated Coconut. What an impressive horse. I've seen him compete many times but to actually get to see and pet him. He is a big suck that loves to get scratched behind his ears.

He was quite the star while at the vets getting collected. And yes, you could really tell that he was horribly abused. ;) (Sarcasm here!)

Nancy!

How cool is that?! And what a weird combination -- a world-class bucking STALLION who is a cream-puff to be around and handle.

He has to be 1:million!

It will be interesting to see if hewill throw that mellow "but I'll still lawn-dart your a$$ if you try to ride me" disposition to his babies.

RougeEmpire
Apr. 19, 2011, 12:56 PM
How cool is that?! And what a weird combination -- a world-class bucking STALLION who is a cream-puff to be around and handle.

He has to be 1:million!

It will be interesting to see if hewill throw that mellow "but I'll still lawn-dart your a$$ if you try to ride me" disposition to his babies.

It's a common misconception that bucking horse stock are "wild broncs". They are almost always pretty darn tame and usually pretty well ground broke. HOLLYWOOD has made them into "wild" horses. Bucking stock are totally domestic, usually handled as young stock and totally halter broke. Bucking horses are not bred to be wild or feral. They are bred to have a kind of conformation that created a great buck and great style. They are not much different than race horses really (and worth just as much).

They need to be handleable above all. Stock contractors handle their horses and bulls on a dialy basis. The fact is you can halter, handle, groom and medicate most of these animals with little to no problem. The bulls are more dangerous, but bulls always are. A "wild" or "mean" horse does not make a great bucking horse, a great bucking horse makes a great bucking horse. Temeperment has little to do with it. Just like with top show jumpers, some have great temperments, other will eat you alive. No one likes the mean ones and no one breeds FOR a mean horse (regardless of the sport) but if the horse is stellar and can win win win an acception is made.

There is a lot of draft blood in modern bucking stock, adds SIZE, color, lots of bone and a pretty laid back temperment. Stock contracts have a bred a kind of horse that can buck like the devil out of the shoot but turns into a totally mellow easy going horse when he is not "on the clock". A lot of them have better temperments and manners that a lot of top winning show horses that's for sure! :lol:

Kyzteke
Apr. 19, 2011, 01:06 PM
It's a common misconception that bucking horse stock are "wild broncs". They are almost always pretty darn tame and usually pretty well ground broke. HOLLYWOOD has made them into "wild" horses. :lol:

Well, it's been many, many years since I attended alot of rodeos (mainly to chase cowboys :D), but back then the broncs were mainly "handled" via a chute system and were NOT halter broke per se.

They were herded into trailers, etc. and didn't look like they were trimmed very often...they had a typical "natural" hoof, in that Nature and lots of turn-out did the trimming.

And most of them would be VERY willing to kick your head off given the opportunity.

But this was easily 30+ years ago, so maybe that has changed.

I know most of the certainly didn't have the $$value that good bucking stock has today and nobody (that I was aware of) was actually BREEDING bucking stock back then.

But then, rodeo as a sport has changed enormously as well since that time....

RougeEmpire
Apr. 19, 2011, 02:28 PM
Rodeo is definetly a whole differnt world these day! There is so much money it and believe it or not BULL RIDING is one of the fastest grow sports in the country! The handling of stock horses has changes a lot but stayed the same so to speak over the years. They still live and move as a herd, in open stock trailers or custom built double deckers. The horses are INSURED for tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars. The way they are moved and handled is more about efficency and keeping the horses relaxed (sans ulcers) than anything. To move and keep horses is established herds is a million times better than over handling them and managing them like most high dollar show horses are.

They still move and handle the horses via shoots and pens but it's not because the horses are dangerous (most arn't) it's just much more efficent and safer to move several dozen horses at once that way. The stock contracts KNOW who can travel with whom, who is the herd leader and who is low man on the totem pole. They load, unload and house horses via the social pecking order. Individual horses can always be pulled out and handled if need be. Even the slightest bump, bruise or scrape is evaluated. The horses are worth to much money to leave anything to chance and the stock contractors really do love their horses and cattle. They would rather retire the animal sound than keep using him after he/she has proven their self.

bornfreenowexpensive
Apr. 19, 2011, 03:07 PM
I've heard that some even do chiro and other alternative body work on their stock. They recognize that they are athletes and work hard to get the best performance.

There is a lot of money in the sport...not just for the riders, but there are prizes for the top stock contractors as well. So besides just being good horsemen-cattlemen.....there are significant incentives to breed and maintain their top performers.

They even have syndicates that own bucking bulls now....

GAEventer
Apr. 19, 2011, 04:28 PM
Interesting post, thanks for sharing! I had no qualms about selling a QH mare to the rodeo, we had saved her from an auction, and were never able to trust her. She'd buck, rear, spin, strike, and try to tap dance on your head, better option for her than a trip to Mexico. Folks came out to try her, and she put on a show, bucked, reared, spun, etc; they bought her on the spot. Good bucking horses sell for good money, and they're very well taken care of!

DontStrikeOut
Apr. 19, 2011, 05:00 PM
Some of my question was already answered (GC looks like he's got some draft in him).

Is there a certain breed or (s)...that bucking horse people look for?

Other than breeding for them... how do you look for and buy a bucking horse? (stupid question perhaps but it had genuine intellect behind it).

LOL if I can breed, and raise some babies....and have a demand for said babies... Maybe I should get into the bucking business =)

RougeEmpire
Apr. 19, 2011, 05:10 PM
Some of my question was already answered (GC looks like he's got some draft in him).

Is there a certain breed or (s)...that bucking horse people look for?

Other than breeding for them... how do you look for and buy a bucking horse? (stupid question perhaps but it had genuine intellect behind it).

LOL if I can breed, and raise some babies....and have a demand for said babies... Maybe I should get into the bucking business =)

At the Championship levels they are almost always cross breds. Remember that the TOP level rodeos are quite different than small rinky dink rodeos. THOSE top horses come from top breeder and proven stock contractors. So it's really IDENTICAL to super high end "sport horse" breeding. Big bucks, big names and big wins. So for Joe Shmoe to get into it is just like getting into high end Sport Horse breeding. You need top stock from winning lines, the money to travel and use your animals and in the world of rodeo you need CONTACTS. Those big rodeos contract top winning Stock Contractos and no one else.

There are online actions and BIG sales of bucking stock every year. Good horses and bulls get pricey fast! You would need be BUY great breeding stock, educate yourself on the best blood lines and set up a breeding program like any other. You can sell your youngstock just like youngstock are sold at "Elite Sport Horse Auctions". Except they are put are "bucked" instead of ridden infront of the auction floor. Yes you can make a lot of money but you also have to invest a lot of money and most top winning rough stock stallions stand to VERY LIMITED outside mares and at considerable expense.

Christa P
Apr. 19, 2011, 06:16 PM
Whats also impressive was hearing the announcer say that his dam was bucking at that same rodeo and until his ride helping cowboys to arena records. I'm a little surprised after his fame they did not retire her to breeding full time as well.

Just Speculation, but maybe they are using ET. Grated Coconut might have several 1/2 or full siblings while his dam is still on the circuit.

Christa

columbus
Apr. 19, 2011, 10:55 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/sports/story/2008/07/03/f-rodeo-animalstars-finstad.html

Kyzteke
Apr. 20, 2011, 12:54 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/sports/story/2008/07/03/f-rodeo-animalstars-finstad.html


So they ARE using ET!

Next up: Brentina carries an embryo from Coconut Roll!:lol::lol:

Cindy's Warmbloods
Apr. 20, 2011, 11:33 AM
Well they are not ALL treated well. There is a group of 15 mares at the end of my street that have been on a 160 acres all winter with no food or water (they have a "wet area" to drink from in the summer but it freezes in the winter. They are pawing in snow past their knees and eating heaven knows what, but suprisingly they look "o.k." so the SPCA would not do anything. They stay in the back part of their pasture so I don't see them very often but have ridden back there a few times to check on them. All are in foal and will foal without supervision as they owners do not live on the property or come and check on them more than every few weeks :-( It really is a shame they are treated so inconsiderately.

Glad to see there are definitely some that are treated really well and with respect. He is a neat looking stallion!

RougeEmpire
Apr. 20, 2011, 12:43 PM
Well they are not ALL treated well. There is a group of 15 mares at the end of my street that have been on a 160 acres all winter with no food or water (they have a "wet area" to drink from in the summer but it freezes in the winter. They are pawing in snow past their knees and eating heaven knows what, but suprisingly they look "o.k." so the SPCA would not do anything. They stay in the back part of their pasture so I don't see them very often but have ridden back there a few times to check on them. All are in foal and will foal without supervision as they owners do not live on the property or come and check on them more than every few weeks :-( It really is a shame they are treated so inconsiderately.

Glad to see there are definitely some that are treated really well and with respect. He is a neat looking stallion!

This true in general in LOW END breeding programs though, it really has nothing to do with Rodeo. There are plenty of breeding farms that produce all kinds of horse that care for their stock horribly.

Rodeo is BIG money and contractors don't get the job unless their horses are fit enough to do the job. The fact is MOST (not "some") are treated with great repsect and handled with great care. It's a common misconception tha the five star world class care of rough stock is the acception not the rule. The truth is well more often than not rough stock recieve the very best care money can buy. The "Hollywood" version of Rodeo and Cowboys is just that, Hollywood. Treating horses and cattle better than the men working them has always been the rule, not the acception. The fact is you are MORE likely to find rough stock in excellent shape, recieving the best of care and being treated like the high dollar sports athletes that they are as opposed to the PETA bs propaganda that so many are used to believing.

In short Stock Contactors that do not care well for their working horses or their breeding stock are not hired and more often than not shunned by other Stock Contractors. Makes for people who quickly no longer work in Rodeo. It's true there is always going to be the "bad apples" but more and more we see less and less of them. The field is to competative and the industry does not generally tolorate substandard care of rough stock.

Kyzteke
Apr. 20, 2011, 01:23 PM
Well they are not ALL treated well. There is a group of 15 mares at the end of my street that have been on a 160 acres all winter with no food or water (they have a "wet area" to drink from in the summer but it freezes in the winter. They are pawing in snow past their knees and eating heaven knows what, but suprisingly they look "o.k." so the SPCA would not do anything. They stay in the back part of their pasture so I don't see them very often but have ridden back there a few times to check on them. All are in foal and will foal without supervision as they owners do not live on the property or come and check on them more than every few weeks :-( It really is a shame they are treated so inconsiderately.


Well, if they look "ok" then they probably are "ok". If there are only 15 horses on 160 acres there is probably enough to eat under the snow. This is what mustangs and range horses do...

Just because a horse isn't stalled, fed rich hay, grained up the wazoo and foaled with 14 people looking at them does not mean they are being mistreated....;)

Again, what Rouge says -- if this person is a stock contractor and his stock is not healthy, won't buck, won't hold up, then he is shooting himself in the foot as far as business goes.

Hopefully he knows this.

Good ranchers take good care of their stock, but its not the "molly-coddling" many COTH breeders consider "good care". Different philosophy -- a more "natural" approach -- but it's hardly neglect.

They know their stock, they know their land and they know how to manage them both for optimum results.

Of course your neighbor may not be a good rancher, but just saying....

Cindy's Warmbloods
Apr. 20, 2011, 08:11 PM
No, I don't think they are being seriously mistreated but the field they are on was cut just before winter so it is not like it is lush grazing. However, they have pulled through. I haven't seen them for a month or so as they don't come out front very often so will be interesting to see them when they have shedded off.