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RolyPolyPony
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:38 AM
This really is farm-related! We're looking for a new house, and looked at one yesterday that we quite liked. Nice house, 2 acres w/ a 2 stall barn, all fenced - perfect for the goats (and chickens!) I want to eventually get. However, there's an inground pool on the property. It's not in the best shape, and I really don't want a pool anyway - and, while it has it's own fence, I can totally imagine goats climbing the fence and trying to swim - eeep! ;)

Anyone know how hard - and expensive - it would be to remove an inground pool? My husband thinks it wouldn't be that bad, especially as this one is on a sorta raised area - he thinks basically bulldozing the rise it's on would work, and then the whole lots would be flat. I think he's maybe a bit over optimistic! ;)

So does anyone have any experience w/ getting rid of an inground?

kinnip
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:43 AM
A friend of mine just went through this. The city had a very specific set of instructions to follow. I'm not sure what was involved in capping off the plumbing, but the pool itself had to be filled with concrete.

Sparky
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:45 AM
I don't think removing the pool is even necessary. The one experience I've had seeing that done was at a country club that wanted to get rid of two tennis courts and a pool. They simply bulldozed the courts into the pool then hauled in topsoil, laid sod and in two days it was a putting green. Is there a place you want to level that could become fill for the pool?

JB
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:46 AM
First, find out from your County what any requirements are.

If you can't remove the concrete, then get holes drilled in the bottom, and fill it with dirt if you can. At least that way you have a usable spot. If you HAVE to fill it with concrete, then maybe you have an instant patio LOL

Zwarte
Apr. 18, 2011, 09:01 AM
http://thereifixedit.failblog.org/2011/04/17/white-trash-repairsgetting-the-chlorine-and-fertilizer-mixed-up-can-be-a-pain/

lostkiwi
Apr. 18, 2011, 12:06 PM
We had an older inground swimming pool at our last house. I hated it. Hated taking care of it in summer and winter...yuck!. Got used very little so when the pool pump died, my hubby and I decided just to get rid of the whole mess.


We checked with township and then took care of filling in pool. Had to get electrician to disconnect power source to pool pump etc.

We drained water then drilled holes into bottom of the pool floor. The concrete path that surrounded the edge, we cut and broke up and dumped into pool. Then got clean fill dirt delivered. That took several dump trucks full. Seeded area with grass and within 6 weeks it didn't even look like a pool had existed anywhere on the property.

Took a weekend to do. Hard work but wasn't that expensive if I remember right, the fill dirt was the most expensive part of the whole project. Maybe max $500 total and gone was the aggravation of maintaining an older pool.

RolyPolyPony
Apr. 18, 2011, 12:21 PM
Thanks, everyone! So it sounds like it's a pain, but maybe not quite as bad as I feared. Most important is to check w/ the town to see what their rules are, and then make sure to get the electric/plumbing squared away before anything else.

Hmmm.

CatOnLap
Apr. 18, 2011, 12:34 PM
fill it with concrete? That's almost as expensive as building a new one!

Here's an idea- throw a couple of sticks of dynamite in it...

Gbryelle
Apr. 18, 2011, 12:36 PM
Check with your town or township, but we did like lostkiwi did, just punched holes in bottom, collapsed sides in and filled.

It now acts like a big french drain in front of my barn addition.

MunchkinsMom
Apr. 18, 2011, 02:27 PM
I need to save this thread, as my DH keeps threatening to get rid of the large inground pool here on the farm. I told him to wait until our daughter is off to college, since she and her high school friends do use it a lot. And because we are one of the few with a pool, all the kids come here instead, and I can keep an eye on them, and know they are not out and about getting into trouble.

But when the time comes, and least now I know what to do.

Oh, what about all the water that is in the pool? Do you drain it first?

AnotherRound
Apr. 18, 2011, 03:06 PM
I need to save this thread, as my DH keeps threatening to get rid of the large inground pool here on the farm. I told him to wait until our daughter is off to college, since she and her high school friends do use it a lot. And because we are one of the few with a pool, all the kids come here instead, and I can keep an eye on them, and know they are not out and about getting into trouble.

But when the time comes, and least now I know what to do.

Oh, what about all the water that is in the pool? Do you drain it first?

do you drain it first? Before what, drilling holes?? Depends if you want to dive down and drill holes underwater. Before collapsing the sides in? Depends if you want to use the front loader at the edge of 12 feet of water. Before filling it with dirt? Depends if you want to be able to walk on it afterwards, or if you're fine with a mud hole. Before filling it with concrete? Depends on if you ever want the concrete to set. I mean, really can you imagine the cement mixer coming to the site, the sluce extended over the pool, and the concrete pouring down the long sluce into a pool of water!! What would you think, drain or not drain?

It seems to me that the answer to your question "Do you drain it first" is one you could proabably answer yourself with a little thought. !!:confused:

JanM
Apr. 18, 2011, 03:25 PM
Yes, you have to drain it (though you can get people in scuba gear to repair cracks underwater with special fillers these days). Or you could stock it with trout and go fishing instead of filling it in. I know of several commercial pools that have been taken out of service (I think they had major cracks and mechanical problems with the filters and water systems) that were drained, diving boards/ladders etc removed and resold, and the dirt dumped in after the pool deck was ripped up and dumped in. You do have to overfill the pool to allow for settling, and then sod or whatever you want to replace the pool with. I'm sure you could leave a little water in the bottom before filling, but you still have to allow for the dirt settling. If I was putting a patio or other hardscape on top I would fill in, wait for settling, then fill to make it flat, tamp down and then put in the patio or whatever goes there next.

DakotaTA
Apr. 18, 2011, 03:55 PM
MIL filled in her pool. It had a nice fence around it she left. Her pool had a vinyl liner, but the usual thing is to break up the concrete at the bottom, then fill in with dirt. After she had hers filled in, she planted her garden there. The fence kept the animals out.

Equibrit
Apr. 18, 2011, 04:00 PM
I wonder if you could convert it to some sort of animal use ? Goat or chicken apartments?

Zwarte
Apr. 18, 2011, 04:08 PM
catfish?

eqinegirl
Apr. 18, 2011, 04:23 PM
This really is farm-related! We're looking for a new house, and looked at one yesterday that we quite liked. Nice house, 2 acres w/ a 2 stall barn, all fenced - perfect for the goats (and chickens!) I want to eventually get. However, there's an inground pool on the property. It's not in the best shape, and I really don't want a pool anyway - and, while it has it's own fence, I can totally imagine goats climbing the fence and trying to swim - eeep! ;)

Anyone know how hard - and expensive - it would be to remove an inground pool? My husband thinks it wouldn't be that bad, especially as this one is on a sorta raised area - he thinks basically bulldozing the rise it's on would work, and then the whole lots would be flat. I think he's maybe a bit over optimistic! ;)

So does anyone have any experience w/ getting rid of an inground?

First check with any pool suppliers in the area & then call the township. You will probably need a permit to destroy the pool. I have a pool on our farm & I'd love to destroy it. Good luck.
;)

Trevelyan96
Apr. 18, 2011, 05:33 PM
do you drain it first? Before what, drilling holes?? Depends if you want to dive down and drill holes underwater. Before collapsing the sides in? Depends if you want to use the front loader at the edge of 12 feet of water. Before filling it with dirt? Depends if you want to be able to walk on it afterwards, or if you're fine with a mud hole. Before filling it with concrete? Depends on if you ever want the concrete to set. I mean, really can you imagine the cement mixer coming to the site, the sluce extended over the pool, and the concrete pouring down the long sluce into a pool of water!! What would you think, drain or not drain?

It seems to me that the answer to your question "Do you drain it first" is one you could proabably answer yourself with a little thought. !!:confused:

Really, AR, was that really necessary?

MunchkinsMom
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:34 PM
Well, in another thread someone had said to call a pool company to come pump out the pool and take the water away, vs just draining it out into the lawn/pasture (in my case that is where it would end up, in the pasture). So I guess I was not clear enough on the reason for my question.

So, let me rephrase it, drain or have it pumped out?

JanWeber
Apr. 19, 2011, 08:20 PM
Before you get rid of it, you may want to check the location of the nearest fire hydrant. Having a pool provides an available water source in case of fire and may be a factor in your home insurance rates. Also, if yo do decide to remove it - it's a lot easier to remove a vinyl liner pool than concrete or gunite...

sketcher
Apr. 19, 2011, 10:15 PM
fill it with concrete? That's almost as expensive as building a new one!

Here's an idea- throw a couple of sticks of dynamite in it...

It might depend on where you live. Around here, I've heard it costs more to have the pool filled in that the original installation.

My house had a pool - a previous owner allegedly had it filled in because the horse kept getting/falling into it. I'm not sure if it is a true story as I can't fathom how the horse escapes paddock, opens pool gate and then falls in - multiple times.

furlong47
Apr. 19, 2011, 10:23 PM
Just make sure it gets done right.... Summer camp that I grew up attending (and later worked at) built a new pool and had the old one filled in. There were always sinkholes and stuff in that area for years afterward. I can imagine that a horse or goat falling into a sinkhole might be just as bad as them falling into the pool...

CatOnLap
Apr. 20, 2011, 01:42 PM
My house had a pool - a previous owner allegedly had it filled in because the horse kept getting/falling into it. I'm not sure if it is a true story as I can't fathom how the horse escapes paddock, opens pool gate and then falls in - multiple times.

You might want to ask Cowgirl that one :eek: ...but it may have only been once... :yes: and I believe it was an ornamental pond, not a pool... :confused: and the horse definitely survived. :D

katarine
Apr. 20, 2011, 02:26 PM
Well, in another thread someone had said to call a pool company to come pump out the pool and take the water away, vs just draining it out into the lawn/pasture (in my case that is where it would end up, in the pasture). So I guess I was not clear enough on the reason for my question.

So, let me rephrase it, drain or have it pumped out?

Gotta say I'm with A/R: Only you can really answer that, or call a pool company for their suggestion. Do you want all that treated water all over your grass?

ladybugred
Apr. 20, 2011, 03:19 PM
I would have it pumped out, I wouldn't want those chemicals on my yard.

I would have it filled in with dirt and turn it into a great raised bed, complete with animal proof fence!

LBR

carolprudm
Apr. 20, 2011, 05:46 PM
We have an inground pool which Mr P hates. However my summer chore outfit is PJ's over a swim suit. When chores are done I hop in the pool.

CatOnLap
Apr. 20, 2011, 06:19 PM
My neighbour drains his pool into my pasture on those rare occasions when it needs to be drained for repairs- once every couple of eyars or so. Its just the way the land slopes- it runs 20 feet over his land and then crosses our property line into the grass. There aren't a lot of harmful chemicals in the water any more than there are in tapwater. Some chlorine and other salts, and most of the chlorine evaporates quickly into the air as the water runs over the ground. The grass is definitely greener and grows faster for weeks afterwards because of the amount of water. I mean we swim in the stuff, it can't be that harmful.

I imagine if you live cheek by jowl in the city, draining 20,000 gallons into your neighbour's backyard would probably not be a good thing to do, but here in the country, what's a little water between friends?

MediaMD
Apr. 21, 2011, 03:40 PM
DH and I faced this same perplexing problem: fix the pool or fill it in? We have elected to fix our 30 yr old concrete pool ourselves as we were getting jaw dropping quotes from surly pool company representatives. Last weekend began the process with draining the dark green, dead frog graveyard. I thought draining all that water would take ages since the pool pump is broken--but nay, not so.

Home Depot rents a submersible pump and 2 50ft fire hoses for $40 for 24hrs. Less if you get it back in half a day. Our 15x24 ft pool emptied in under 4 hrs and we added pipe to the end of the hose and kept moving the end around so it didn't make craters in the pasture but although it was muddy and icky for about 24 hrs it rather easily soaked in.

We live in the country so we didn't ask our neighbors their opinion but since it was still on our property we didn't feel the need.

If anyone is interested, here is the link to the products we used to refurbish our pool. Before it looked like a failed skin graft on the bottom with the old paint/surface worn away so even with clean water it looked like a fish pond. But SO FAR, we are extremely happy with the results. Paint came today and as soon as the sun comes out and dries the surface again we will finish it up.

http://www.sanitred.com/SwimmingPool.htm

Good luck with your pool destruction OP :)

IFG
Apr. 21, 2011, 04:32 PM
Neighbors dumped a lot of trash in it, then covered with soil. Shh... don't tell the town.

RolyPolyPony
Apr. 22, 2011, 09:34 AM
We're going back to look at the house again tomorrow - I'm still a bit wary, but the house is so cool, and having two acres would be fantastic! Goats! Chickens!! Maybe a Wee Cow? ;) Our realtor said we could always try to get the seller to fill it in, as a condition of the sale, but I;m not sure how I'd feel about not knowing HOW they filled it in!!

IFG
Apr. 22, 2011, 09:40 AM
Just noticed that you are in my area. What town are you looking in?

RolyPolyPony
Apr. 22, 2011, 09:55 AM
Just noticed that you are in my area. What town are you looking in?

We're looking around Medway/Medfield/Norfolk - DH's job moved to Providence, I work in Waltham, and so we're looking for a place midway between! Whee!!