PDA

View Full Version : Rusting electric handles



Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Apr. 17, 2011, 11:28 PM
I use a bunch of electric tape gates in my run-in. Generally works great, but I am getting rust on the metal parts of the handles I use, and I count on the handles carrying charge thru them to the next stretch of fence.

Have tried the very cheap plastic, the midrange red rubber, and the more expensive black rubber coated handles; the black rubber ones definitely hold up best, but I'm wondering if there is something I can do to slow down the rust which accumulates on them.

Frank B
Apr. 18, 2011, 10:27 AM
Not a whole lot. The galvanizing they put on most consumer products these days is just enough to make it look good in the parts bin.

There are some paints and surface treatment compounds, but from what I understand, they're hardly worth the trouble as the metal will still rust at the wear points.

The easiest thing to do is periodically touch up the areas where electrical contact is made with a stiff wire brush.

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Apr. 18, 2011, 11:39 PM
Bummer! I have done the wire brush treatment several times, and am tired of it! Maybe I can get some handles made and galvanized by a metal fabrication place?? Am I dreaming?

clanter
Apr. 18, 2011, 11:42 PM
Not a whole lot. The galvanizing they put on most consumer products these days is just enough to make it look good in the parts bin.

.

I believe the plating is nickel not zinc galvanization

Adamantane
May. 24, 2011, 09:32 AM
There used to be a trick sometimes used up North to reduce the rust corrosion on body sheet metal of cars. One would take a chunk of magnesium metal and attach it to the underside of the car, so it would be in electrical contact with the whole vehicle. For reasons having to do with electrochemical oxidation potential, the magnesium would corrode preferentially to the body metal. Periodically the magnesium bar would need replacement.

Perhaps there's a way to attach metal with greater electrochemical oxidation potential to the handles. Most obvious cheap choice would be soldering or otherwise attaching so it is in electrical contact, a penny to each handle. Pennies nowadays are zinc coated with a thin wash of copper. I'd need to go back and look up to be sure that zinc indeed has greater oxidation potential than iron.

ReSomething
May. 24, 2011, 12:09 PM
There used to be a trick sometimes used up North to reduce the rust corrosion on body sheet metal of cars. One would take a chunk of magnesium metal and attach it to the underside of the car, so it would be in electrical contact with the whole vehicle. For reasons having to do with electrochemical oxidation potential, the magnesium would corrode preferentially to the body metal. Periodically the magnesium bar would need replacement.

Perhaps there's a way to attach metal with greater electrochemical oxidation potential to the handles. Most obvious cheap choice would be soldering or otherwise attaching so it is in electrical contact, a penny to each handle. Pennies nowadays are zinc coated with a thin wash of copper. I'd need to go back and look up to be sure that zinc indeed has greater oxidation potential than iron.

Well, underwater it sure does. Actually I take that back - sacrificial zincs give themselves up when bonded to any nobler metal in salt water. Changing zincs is necessary maintenance for salt water kept boats, and the steel ones especially. Whether the corrosion is exactly equivalent to oxidation I really don't know.

Adamantane
May. 24, 2011, 12:16 PM
Well, underwater it sure does. Actually I take that back - sacrificial zincs give themselves up when bonded to any nobler metal in salt water. Changing zincs is necessary maintenance for salt water kept boats, and the steel ones especially. Whether the corrosion is exactly equivalent to oxidation I really don't know.

Great! Then it should work. And will only cost a penny per handle every now and again! (Didn't know about zinc for boats in salt water. Should work okay then with any water including rain water other than maybe distilled where there would be little conductivity.)