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View Full Version : Organic or Natural or NotTooToxic garden pest control....



IntegritySporthorses
Apr. 15, 2011, 02:34 PM
I moved my cantelope to the garden only to discover they have been savaged by some nasty green beetle that looks like the evil cousin of the lady bug. :mad::mad:

What do you use in your garden that isn't too toxic?

I'm not totally convinced it needs to be "organic" but maybe something that's not going to make me grow horns or an extra arm or glow in the dark in 20 years.

I also don't want to use anything that will kill the bees, if possible.

cloudyandcallie
Apr. 15, 2011, 02:40 PM
marigolds. You can grow them and then steep them in hot water and spray that on plants. And grow them around and interspersed with vegetables. ]
And ladybugs. you can order them from garden supply catalogues. Just don't use any bug sprays around your ladybugs.

Alagirl
Apr. 15, 2011, 02:40 PM
pick off what you see. Toss into a vat with rubbing alcohol. quiet toxic, but you are not consuming it. (I did spray it on bugs, but I am careful about it, it could burn the plant)
Also, commonly not understood well: some of the most toxic substances are indeed nature made...:cool:

After you identified your pest, pick up a spray and use it as directed. You should be perfectly fine.

AnotherRound
Apr. 15, 2011, 04:43 PM
Ducks and chickens. Some breeds are really great, don't know what ones. Some ducks or geese will clean up all your ticks out of the grass!! Yuck! Many will pick the garden clean. FInd out from chick and duck people!

GoForAGallop
Apr. 15, 2011, 04:55 PM
Ducks and chickens. Some breeds are really great, don't know what ones. Some ducks or geese will clean up all your ticks out of the grass!! Yuck! Many will pick the garden clean. FInd out from chick and duck people!

Yeah, but you gotta be careful, cause they'll also munch up the plants along with the bugs! :lol:

IntegritySporthorses
Apr. 15, 2011, 05:35 PM
Ok, good info.

I'll get a flat of marigolds tomorrow and plant them all over the garden :-)

Not so sure about the ducks and chickens. I have two laying hens that are free range but don't come as far south as the garden. That said, I planted some pumpkins behind the barn the other day and they seemed quite interested in the bright green leaves. I'm building a chicken tractor soon as I'm sick of the chicken $hit everywhere in my barn. :mad:

Daydream Believer
Apr. 15, 2011, 05:40 PM
Another way to protect plants without chemicals is to get a row cover made of bug mesh. So you make a physical barrier. Here is an example for you of what I'm talking about. I'll probably be buying quite a bit of this this summer!

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-5455-agribon-ag-15-insect-barrier-118-x-50.aspx

IntegritySporthorses
Apr. 15, 2011, 05:50 PM
Another way to protect plants without chemicals is to get a row cover made of bug mesh. So you make a physical barrier. Here is an example for you of what I'm talking about. I'll probably be buying quite a bit of this this summer!

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-5455-agribon-ag-15-insect-barrier-118-x-50.aspx

That's an awesome idea and I've thought about trying that. However, we have so much wind and so many storms in the spring I don't think it would last. For example, today we have 20-30 mph wind with gusts to 40+ uggg.

coloredcowhorse
Apr. 15, 2011, 06:53 PM
I moved my cantelope to the garden only to discover they have been savaged by some nasty green beetle that looks like the evil cousin of the lady bug. :mad::mad:

What do you use in your garden that isn't too toxic?

I'm not totally convinced it needs to be "organic" but maybe something that's not going to make me grow horns or an extra arm or glow in the dark in 20 years.

I also don't want to use anything that will kill the bees, if possible.

Capture the offending critter (on film or in a small jar) and see if you can identify it....or take it to your agricultural extension service for ID...and they will have suggestions for your area. I import praying mantises and lady bugs for my garden....the surrounding desert seems to keep them here.

Daydream Believer
Apr. 15, 2011, 07:38 PM
That's an awesome idea and I've thought about trying that. However, we have so much wind and so many storms in the spring I don't think it would last. For example, today we have 20-30 mph wind with gusts to 40+ uggg.

You bury the edges with dirt and that keeps it down. It might work... I have a lot of wind here too and I'm going to give it a try.

horsefaerie
Apr. 18, 2011, 02:29 AM
Call buglogicals or arbico when you identify your pests. They'll ship you the insects that will handle it.

JB
Apr. 18, 2011, 08:50 AM
Marigolds are great - for nematodes :lol: You aren't dealing with 'todes here though.

Pick-n-dump is probably the most organic method. The jar into which you dump them can just be soapy water - organic soap if you must :lol:

Where'sMyWhite
Apr. 18, 2011, 09:20 AM
Maybe the striped cucumber beetle???

http://tinyurl.com/3tntkbv

Google + cantaloupe + beetle + pest is very useful to at least identify what you have. From there you can continue research on what types of control options will work.

atlatl
Apr. 18, 2011, 11:19 AM
Sluggo-Plus works great. It saved my spinach.