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View Full Version : Safe/Recommended to use concrete mix for mud in turnout?



kchajka
Apr. 13, 2011, 09:36 AM
Hello

I have tried to do several internet searches (including on this forum) to find out the cheapest/safest/quickest/lowest maintainence ways to fix some of the mud problems in my turnouts. The horses are fed in their turnouts.

One thing I came across was an old-timer trick of pouring concrete mix into the mud, taking a stick and packing it down, keeping the horses off it until it sets up.

Has anyone done this? Is this easier than replacing mulch each year?

It seems like the best solution is to excavate, geotextile and gravel. I've seen those grids too, they look great. But not sure that I can afford either of those options yet, so was wondering about the concrete mix option.

Thanks! K

HydroPHILE
Apr. 13, 2011, 09:40 AM
What you're describing is pretty much the same as concrete with a higher propensity for cracking due to the diminished structural integrity by mixing it with the mud. If you're going to do that, why not just pour a concrete slab in the area in which you feed them?

mkevent
Apr. 13, 2011, 12:01 PM
I just bought some geotextile fabric last week and I'm hoping to lay some down soon. My plan is to add crushed asphalt or concrete on top of the carpet and then another layer of fabric and then dirt on top. It will be the same principle as cow carpet, only my fabric was $265 for a 300' roll. It was half the thickness of cow carpet but I'm doing 2 layers. Doing it this way cost less. Hopefully it will work as well.

If you just want the area where you feed mud free, maybe you could excavate to the hard dirt and then fill with stone/crushed concrete/asphalt and lay mats on top?

I've found the crushed concrete or asphalt runs about $12-$13 a ton delivered. I just called paving contractors in the area and asked around.

I agree that just mixing in dry concrete probably won't work the best as a long term fix.

pj
Apr. 13, 2011, 12:50 PM
Hello

I have tried to do several internet searches (including on this forum) to find out the cheapest/safest/quickest/lowest maintainence ways to fix some of the mud problems in my turnouts. The horses are fed in their turnouts.

One thing I came across was an old-timer trick of pouring concrete mix into the mud, taking a stick and packing it down, keeping the horses off it until it sets up.

Has anyone done this? Is this easier than replacing mulch each year?

Thanks! K

I did this with some dog runs. There is a bit more to it than poking it down in the mud with a stick. :D
I mixed it in with a rake.
It lasted appx. ten years without cracking but this was dogs not horses so don't know that it would hold up to the weight of horses that long if at all.
You also have to keep it moist for a while (don't remember how long) so in my case that meant misting it every day, sometimes twice a day.

Lady Counselor
Apr. 13, 2011, 12:51 PM
I've tried several methods over the years, and have found some pros and cons on them.
Slabs, while great for putting troughs on, aren't all that great long term. They can crack and disintegrate at the edges, not to mention the possible slipping hazard for shod feet. Maybe if matted over, they would work better.
Gravel with mats on top can start out ok, but mud can cause shifting to where the surface becomes uneven, or sunken in.
I have not tried actual cowcarpet installed correctly, but would like to someday. I have tried old carpets spread out over areas to stablize it. Short term solution, often resulting in more mess.
After many years of trial and error, I finally came to the point with my sacrifice paddock that I finally simply have my landscaper scrape it off in the spring and dump some fresh. bank run sand down. While the sand still gets wet, it's a clean wet, not mucky at all, and dries faster. Once a year keeps the area nicely, and usually costs me less than $400.

Boomer
Apr. 13, 2011, 02:02 PM
I used "concrete wash-out" under my hay sheds and as a 12'x12' pad for my water troughs and so far like it.

"concrete wash-out" around here is pretty cheap. I have a contruction guy that will deliver it in one of his dump trucks. It set up and won't get muddy, but it isn't slick either. Mine has a variety of small stones in it usually.

Down side is that one of my mares can have pretty sensitive feet so it can be a little ouchy for her during the dry season, but the other 6 horses aren't bothered by it.

HydroPHILE
Apr. 14, 2011, 08:58 AM
I used "concrete wash-out" under my hay sheds and as a 12'x12' pad for my water troughs and so far like it.

FWIW, "concrete wash-out" is the leftover aggregate and water used for washing out ready-mix trucks. You *should* be able to get it for free from most area Ready-mix companies that may be delivering a load of concrete in your area. Many states require wash-out practices for trucks so it would definitely benefit Ready-mix companies in providing them with a cheap alternative to other methods.

If someone is interested in using concrete wash-out, place a call to a local ready-mix company and ask what they do for washing out (or "wash down") of their trucks after a site delivery and if they have any RM trucks in (insert your area here) that need a place to wash-out ("wash down.")

(P.S. The company for whom I work deals A LOT with concrete wash-out, etc. in case you couldn't tell.)

Boomer
Apr. 15, 2011, 10:13 AM
FWIW, "concrete wash-out" is the leftover aggregate and water used for washing out ready-mix trucks. You *should* be able to get it for free from most area Ready-mix companies that may be delivering a load of concrete in your area.

Wish I'd been able to get it free, but I didn't pay much for it.

The concrete place here says you have to come to their yard to get it, so I paid someone with a dump truck to get it for me. So I had to pay for fuel and some time, but they picked it up, brought it to my place and did the work, so it all good : )

I've liked it for the water pads - which were also done as part of the "beginning farmers" thru Dept of NRC. Works great!