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msj
Apr. 10, 2011, 12:50 PM
How do you get rid of it? I bathed my dog today. I gave her 2 soaps, used a mini curry comb to scrub, and a several very good rinses, toweled-dry a lot of the wet coat, and furminated (is that really a word?).:sigh: Well, gave her a good brushing with the Furminator brush.

Anyway, how do you get rid of the wet doggy smell? Is it the shampoo I'm using, or maybe I should say not using. I used the Corona Shampoo that I use on the horses but I do dilute it some.

Am currently in the process of washing ALL 5 dog beds and 2 throws so she just has the 8' couch in the family room to lie on, poor dog. :rolleyes: (now where is that sarcasm emoticon?)

Any suggestions for maybe a different shampoo or just wait until she dries?

FYI-she's an Australian Cattle dog-possibly a mix, definitely a pound hound that was SUPPOSED to be a barn dog but has made it quite clear that while she will go to the barn with me, she also comes right back in the house when I do. :D

She's got a short coat but quite thick.

citydog
Apr. 10, 2011, 01:04 PM
The wet dog smell tends to come from, um, wet dogs. Wait until she dries, and keep in mind that parts of them stay damp quite while.

msj
Apr. 10, 2011, 01:27 PM
The wet dog smell tends to come from, um, wet dogs. Wait until she dries, and keep in mind that parts of them stay damp quite while.

Uh yep, I guess I should have been clearer. :lol: She just doesn't smell any cleaner than she did when we both got drenched in a rain storm before her bath. :sigh: I was kinda hoping that maybe I could find a shampoo or even a conditioner that might 'overcome' or negate the wet dog smell. I don't really want her smelling like Elizabeth Taylor's White Diamonds perfume though. I hope this makes sense.....:confused:

GoForAGallop
Apr. 10, 2011, 01:37 PM
White vinegar rinses are the way to go. Will kill skunk smell, so I'm sure it can handle the regular doggy smell! :)

And no, your dog won't smell like vinegar, it all evaporates as it dries. (But I actually love the smell of vinegar, so it wouldn't matter to me!) My skunk method is to soap up once with shampoo, rinse, dump the vinegar on and scrub, rinse, then take a good sniff. More vinegar rinses (one or two or three!) if the smell doesn't seem to be gone. Then either the doggy gets to hop out, or I go for one last shampoo scrubbing, so said doggy smells like Egyptian Rainfall or whatever. :lol:

Always works. My doggies don't smell doggy.....although I think it should be noted that they all eat some pretty high quality food, so their coats are gorgeous and I'm sure that has something to do with it. Damaged hair soaks up odors.

JanM
Apr. 10, 2011, 02:43 PM
You can also use Arm & Hammer toothpaste (not the gel but the paste) and since it supposedly works on skunk stench too, it might help with this. Plus your dog will be minty fresh too.

Some dogs just have more doggy odor than others do. I don't know if it's the heavy oil some dogs seem to have in their skin, or if it's some kind of genetic thing, but some do smell more doggy than others. And make very sure you get all of the soap out, since any trace can cause itching, and result in scratching and discomfort. Some harder water also makes it rough to get all of the soap and odor off also.

gloriginger
Apr. 10, 2011, 02:48 PM
Sometimes a thyroid issue will make for a stinky dog!

you can use human shampoos on dogs--so a cheap nice smelling suave shampoo will often hide the stink...


I live on the beach and am constantly washing lowtide smell out of my dog- a nice Suave coconut shampoo :)

I also love the Spadog line of dog stuff, they make a nice coat spray...you could give your pup a spritz of 1/2 h20 1/2 vodka and a few drops of essential oil to hide the stinks.

msj
Apr. 10, 2011, 03:29 PM
Wow, some great ideas here. :yes: Thanks to all and keep the ideas coming. :)

Since we are finally getting into warmer weather, I'll try the white vinegar rinses first cause I have a BJ's sized jug of that on hand.

As for gloriginger's idea of "a spritz of 1/2 h20 1/2 vodka"-thanks, I'll drink the vodka instead of giving it to the dog. :lol: :)

crosscreeksh
Apr. 10, 2011, 09:31 PM
I did the white vinegar for a skunking, but also "top dressed" with a light spritzing of Pet Formula Febreeze!! Worked well.

shea'smom
Apr. 11, 2011, 08:53 AM
I just did a search on scabies, because apparently my new pound puppy has it. There was something about using sulfer shampoos to get rid of the wet dog smell, something about yeast getting into little scratches in the skin.

wendy
Apr. 11, 2011, 10:00 AM
what do you feed her? often switching from one of the heavy-grain commercial kibbles to a more appropriate protein-based diet turns a stinky dog into a non-smelling dog.
Some dogs, particularly hounds, have an oil they use to waterproof their coat and they will smell "funky" no matter what you do.

msj
Apr. 11, 2011, 10:45 AM
what do you feed her? often switching from one of the heavy-grain commercial kibbles to a more appropriate protein-based diet turns a stinky dog into a non-smelling dog.
Some dogs, particularly hounds, have an oil they use to waterproof their coat and they will smell "funky" no matter what you do.

She gets 1 cup of Purina One's Active Maturity dry dog food with a generous tablespoon of Alpo canned dog food, plus Cambell's Beef Gravy diluted with water twice/day. She also gets Previcox and 1000 mg of Vit C as per Veterinarians suggestion.

I got her from the shelter 6 yrs ago and they said she was 6 at the time so that puts her at 12 yrs old now. She has always had a 'hound' smell so it could very well be the oil in her coat. I do know she does have a fair amount of oil as it shows on my carpets :(. I can see a big difference between her lying on the carpet as opposed to her bed, which is why she has 5 dog beds and a couple of throws. :)

betsyk
Apr. 11, 2011, 11:27 AM
Ferret shampoo! There's nothing stinkier than a ferret. We kept a bottle of ferret shampoo at the barn for the days when the dogs were too gross to put in the car.

Vennger
Apr. 11, 2011, 11:34 AM
My problem is doggy smell in the car. My dogless pals make such a fuss when we go out anywhere, saying that the car smells. I've tried everything - fabric fresheners, upholstry shampoos, air vent fresheners. And yet, anyone who doesn't have a dog, gets in and goes "phew - it's stinky in here!"

Maybe I should just stop offering lifts!

colorfan
Apr. 11, 2011, 12:12 PM
rid of 'wet dog' smell...dry er off.....:lol: sorry couldn't help it....:winkgrin:

msj
Apr. 11, 2011, 05:43 PM
rid of 'wet dog' smell...dry er off.....:lol: sorry couldn't help it....:winkgrin:

:yes: :lol: Tried that and she still has a bit of doggy odor to her. :sigh: I was too busy today dragging the sacrifice paddocks to smooth out hoof prints to give her another bath to try the vinegar rinse and didn't really want to wash her so soon again anyway. I'll give the vinegar a try first in about a month, unless she comes in covered in mud before then. :)

alto
Apr. 11, 2011, 05:59 PM
Check between her toes, in her ears, any relatively hairless areas to see if there is any reddening of her skin - if she licks & chews at her toes, then it's usually allergies & secondary yeast infections that result in the "wet dog odor" - obviously if they are dirty/muddy/swamp swimming etc farm dogs, you need to bathe before assessing the level of actual doggy odor ;)

Do not use human shampoos on dogs as the pH balance of doggy skin is different than human & the shampoos are balanced for the appropriate species - if you're using an appropriate, gentle shampoo & you rinse thoroughly, you can bathe your dog almost daily without any skin irritation/drying of the coat etc; just like human shampoos, pet versions are often designed to coordinate with a conditioner (also get conditioning 1 step shampoos) so that oils are "returned" to the coat ...

In general if you bathe your dog once a month, any shampoo will do unless your pet has allergies.

AMT
Apr. 11, 2011, 06:42 PM
I agree that a lot depends on feed but sometimes the humidity outside is enough to get them stinky when they come in. We have three dogs, a sheltie,an 85lb aussie and a border collie/corgi.

We use Avocado Mist from Equyss to get rid of the smell. http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productclassid=5092

I pour some into a tiny spray bottle , like those allowed on carry-ons and one spray is enough for the smaller dogs, three for the big dog. One bottle lasts years around our house and does wonders for their coat.

wendy
Apr. 11, 2011, 11:45 PM
She gets 1 cup of Purina One's Active Maturity dry dog food with a generous tablespoon of Alpo canned dog food,
um right. So in other words high-grain unhealthy diet = stinky dog. You want to look for a food that is at least 30% protein on the label. And doesn't cheat by listing "glutens" as an ingredient.

msj
Apr. 12, 2011, 07:39 AM
um right. So in other words high-grain unhealthy diet = stinky dog. You want to look for a food that is at least 30% protein on the label. And doesn't cheat by listing "glutens" as an ingredient.

This is very easy to do. Thanks for the suggestion Wendy. :) I'm almost out of dry dog food anyway.

NRB
Apr. 12, 2011, 10:27 PM
yup, I'd switch the food as well, wait a while and see what happens. Might be something else health related like yeast, might just be you have an odiferous pooch. Hounds do tend to have a reputation for a strong doggy oder. I don't think of heelers as stinky dogs though.

seramisu
Apr. 12, 2011, 11:07 PM
Is it wet dog smell, or dirty/oily/yeasty skin smell?

Even clean wet dogs smell like wet dog; often that smell dissipates once they're dry, but sometimes that smell sticks around if they are damp for a while. I imagine a thick-coated dog like yours takes a while to air dry, even if toweled well first. That gives the wet dog smell time to set in. Best solution is to blow dry her - if drying at home, use the "warm" setting on your hair dryer, not "hot". A force dryer like you would find at a grooming salon will work a whole lot quicker and more effectively, and will also blow out lots of that dead undercoat that you were working on with the Furminator - see if you have a DIY dog wash in your area, then you can use the professional equipment without having to pay a professional to do it.

(I'm a dog groomer =)

If it's dirty/oily/yeasty skin smell, then all of the above advice is good. Grocery store food could definitely have an effect on the health of her skin and coat, and higher quality proteins could help tremendously.

My favorite shampoo for stinky greasy/oily coats is Earthbath's Orange Peel Oil shampoo. (I'm sure there's equivalents in other brands, but Earthbath is what my shop carries.) It's the most effective degreaser I've found, and has a very strong orange scent which I love. It can dry out skin and coat so I always follow it with a cream rinse (Earthbath's cream rinse is vanilla scented, so the dog ends up smelling like a creamsicle - yum!) However if your dog's skin is naturally oily, a little bit of drying out won't hurt.

Super oily skin can be indicative of a medical problem such as a hormonal imbalance. I see a lot of skin problems, including excessively dry and excessively greasy skin, in older dogs. Their bodies are busy keeping their aging vital organs working and don't have the metabolic energy left to take care of their skin and coat.

OverandOnward
Apr. 12, 2011, 11:15 PM
... or just wait until she dries?
Yeah. 30 minutes to dry off, and you have a dog that smells nice like the shampoo.

What's wrong with a wet dog smelling like a wet dog?

30 minutes after the bath the dog will smell better than before the bath, that's all that matters. I wouldn't turn the poor dogs life over with food and special soaps just to avoid something she has a right to, as a dog.

I wonder if this society hasn't become so absolutely spoiled by all the consumerism ...

seramisu
Apr. 12, 2011, 11:40 PM
I wouldn't turn the poor dogs life over with food and special soaps just to avoid something she has a right to, as a dog.


Who's turning her life over?

A better quality food will improve her overall health, and chances are she'll love it - higher protein foods are usually more palatable to dogs.

The dog is going to get bathed anyway, if a different shampoo will make her smell better then why shouldn't the OP use it? If a certain shampoo will result in a less stinky dog, it's quite likely she can go longer between baths.

Yummier, healthier food and fewer, more effective baths... poor dog indeed.

dogponyshow
Apr. 13, 2011, 08:06 AM
I've heard that Listerine will kill that doggie odor ;)

colorfan
Apr. 13, 2011, 08:31 AM
oh, I never thought of the food contributing to smell, makes sense once it is pointed out.

I have an in/out Rough Collie so I deal with the smell and lots of dirt/mud that just clings to her coat so my pup gets a bath fairly regular.

A couple of things I do, when ready to shampoo I put the shampoo into a plastic container such as a 4c measuring cup and then fill half full with water, my purpose in bathing is to get rid of topical dirt and of course some smell, I don't really want to deep clean and take out oils from her skin.

This also makes rinsing much easier, as you can imagine a long coat dog would suds up quite nicely then take a loooong time to rinse.
I don't feel so bad about bathing her a bit more often in the spring either. Although she does, oh my she thinks bathing is the worst thing, she gets sucha sad look.

Once I am finished rinsing I do a final rinse with water that has about a half cup of baking soda in it. It sometimes can feel a wee bit gritty but after she has dried and shaken she always feels soft.
Same idea as the vinegar.

Another thing I have noticed is when she is shedding she really likes to roll, (makes sense) and not only smells like what she is rolling in but perhaps it is like wearing a too heavy coat on a warm day she just seems to have a heavier smell until more of the coat is gone. So more brushing.