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View Full Version : Anyone training with Clark Montgomery?



RunForIt
Apr. 8, 2011, 05:12 PM
I've watched Clark come up the ranks for many years...loved seeing him and Loughan Glen in Mark Leyher's (Hoofclix) pics at Pine Top Farm; their test at the Fork today was simply beautiful. Anyone out there training with Clark? Is he as good a trainer/teacher as he is a rider? a good friend of mine is thinking of going out to work with him when she returns from a stint across the pond...anyone got info re: Clark as an instructor? :cool:

retreadeventer
Apr. 8, 2011, 06:44 PM
I've not had the pleasure of meeting him but I love to watch the way he rides and presents horses, and glad you have been able to see him up close! I value your impressions.
I don't know anyone who has ridden with him. So no help to you! Hey are you going to Rolex, RFI?

deltawave
Apr. 8, 2011, 07:00 PM
I'll never forget him duking it out with Gwennie at one of those O'Connor event camps we went to. Gwen had had ENOUGH of the damn carrot-stick, rope-shaking crap and was fighting back like only an opinionated old chestnut warmblood broad could. :D Karen O. Wanted no part of the mare, so she handed her over to Clark, who in short order had old Gwennie subdued and meekly toeing the Parelli line. :lol: Gwen never argued about it again. I must admit to not waving sticks and ropes at her after that week, however. :uhoh: ;)

faybe
Apr. 8, 2011, 07:27 PM
Never ridden with him or met him but LOVE watching him go at shows. Softest, quietest rider I've seen, truly a pleasure to watch go.

PonyGal08
Apr. 8, 2011, 08:44 PM
I don't have personal experience riding with him, but I did attend many of the same shows when he was based in Texas before moving to Britain, then Georgia. While there I made the point (and had the pleasure) to watch him ride and teach. Back then he was obviously very talented but a bit "rough" on the flat. Now, I see a lot more finesse and polish in his riding. I am so impressed with his hard work.

As for teaching, I remember thinking he was a much more effective teacher over fences than on the flat. But along with his riding that probably has greatly improved as well. As for style, I remember him being respectful towards his students, but expected them to work. I know this is dated info, but I hope it helped!

Aussie08
Apr. 8, 2011, 09:04 PM
I believe that Donna Miller and Devon Brown are currently training with him. You might email Donna about it. Donna seemed very happy last time we chatted about it via email or FB.

VicariousRider
Apr. 8, 2011, 11:43 PM
faybe: Exactly my sentiments!

pony grandma
Apr. 9, 2011, 10:41 AM
Never ridden with him or met him but LOVE watching him go at shows. Softest, quietest rider I've seen, truly a pleasure to watch go.

This was up on EN. Lovely ride!! so fluid.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYKsYAI2KLA&feature=player_embedded

CWD EVENTER
Apr. 9, 2011, 11:30 PM
I have seen him teach, and hes as good of a coach as he is a rider! I personally wouldn't pass up a chance to work with him.

Gestalt
Apr. 10, 2011, 12:26 AM
This was up on EN. Lovely ride!! so fluid.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYKsYAI2KLA&feature=player_embedded

What a lovely horse! The rider seems to have "busy" ankles. Why does that happen? Is the horse hard to move forward? I've seen some dressage-only riders do this too. Just curious.

echodecker
Apr. 10, 2011, 10:12 AM
His ankles look fine to me...I think once you really relax your leg and follow the horse in dressage, they start to move that way. There's a difference between the movement when he's cueing the horse and when he's just loosely moving (following) with the horses movement.

When your background is in jumping (as mine is), we learn to really put weight in the heels which stills the whole leg. Whether we intend to or not, this creates tension in the leg. Which is GOOD for jumping as your leg is your base in 2 pt and galloping positions. Not so good for dressage where your seat is your base and your legs should be relaxed and draped on the horse. Holding your legs and ankles still can only be done by using your muscles, which equals holding in your leg and tension on your horse.

The movement of the horses back has to be absorbed somewhere in the riders body and kind of oscillate out. Many people let it out the top (head bobbing) and try to keep their legs still. I've been taught that the opposite is the goal, a still upper body (strong core), although of course not completely still or stiff...and following draped legs, which move like Clarks are, the ankles are the end...the motion is similar to what you see in the head bobbers head :) This makes sense to me since the horses body is moving under your legs and seat, not your head!

It looks to me like Clark has taken some big steps forward in his dressage compared to many of us eventers. To me this is the most difficult part of our sport, the TOTALLY different seats required to ride over fences and dressage...and do it well.

alicen
Apr. 10, 2011, 10:54 AM
Obsessive-compulsive dressage rider here, but did CM's score of 42.10 seem low for that test?

Divine Comedy
Apr. 10, 2011, 12:54 PM
Obsessive-compulsive dressage rider here, but did CM's score of 42.10 seem low for that test?

I'm assuming that since you are a dressage rider, you are expecting to see scores of 60% or 70%, etc. In pure dressage, you want the highest score. In eventing dressage, the percentages are converted to penalty points, and you want as LOW a score as possible. Clark's 42.1 FEI score translates to roughly a 71.9%.

alicen
Apr. 10, 2011, 04:34 PM
Thanks, DC, glad to know that. I was just subtracting 42.10 from 100.

Gestalt
Apr. 10, 2011, 05:20 PM
His ankles look fine to me...I think once you really relax your leg and follow the horse in dressage, they start to move that way. There's a difference between the movement when he's cueing the horse and when he's just loosely moving (following) with the horses movement.

When your background is in jumping (as mine is), we learn to really put weight in the heels which stills the whole leg. Whether we intend to or not, this creates tension in the leg. Which is GOOD for jumping as your leg is your base in 2 pt and galloping positions. Not so good for dressage where your seat is your base and your legs should be relaxed and draped on the horse. Holding your legs and ankles still can only be done by using your muscles, which equals holding in your leg and tension on your horse.

The movement of the horses back has to be absorbed somewhere in the riders body and kind of oscillate out. Many people let it out the top (head bobbing) and try to keep their legs still. I've been taught that the opposite is the goal, a still upper body (strong core), although of course not completely still or stiff...and following draped legs, which move like Clarks are, the ankles are the end...the motion is similar to what you see in the head bobbers head :) This makes sense to me since the horses body is moving under your legs and seat, not your head!

It looks to me like Clark has taken some big steps forward in his dressage compared to many of us eventers. To me this is the most difficult part of our sport, the TOTALLY different seats required to ride over fences and dressage...and do it well.

Thanks for the explanation, it makes sense. I've seen the head bobbers and it's distracting to watch. Doesn't seem to affect them though.