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View Full Version : Warm-up rule question...sorry!



goodmorning
Apr. 7, 2011, 11:12 AM
Can you use the elastic neck-stretcher while lunging? I prefer it over typical side-reins for my horse who needs some stretchy-time, as he likes to dip behind traditional side-reins, and was a bit confused by the rule-book wording. It looks like the other option, my vienna reins, are not allowed - or is that just while riding?

scubed
Apr. 7, 2011, 11:35 AM
Side reins are permitted only while lunging an unmounted horse, as are running reins and chambons. Other martingales, any form of gadget (such as a bearing, running or balancing reins, etc.) and any form of blinkers, are forbidden, under penalty of disqualification.

Vienna reins are essentially running reins except that technically vienna reins are joined together to go between the front legs to the girth, but I would consider them running reins which would make them legal for lunging (as are side reins and chambons). None of the above are legal while riding.

The elastic neck stretcher is *not legal* while lunging or riding

As always, double check with the president of the ground jury

Hilary
Apr. 7, 2011, 12:05 PM
No, sidereins are the only thing allowed once the competition starts (and only while lunging), which is usually 3pm the day before dressage. Also, no one but the rider may really ride the horse - a groom may hop on and ride the horse from A to B but NO schooling allowed, so pretty much loose rein at a walk.

SaddleUp158
Apr. 7, 2011, 04:25 PM
No, sidereins are the only thing allowed once the competition starts (and only while lunging), which is usually 3pm the day before dressage. Also, no one but the rider may really ride the horse - a groom may hop on and ride the horse from A to B but NO schooling allowed, so pretty much loose rein at a walk.

I am not an evener, but I have always wondered why no one else is allowed on the horse other than the rider who is showing the horse. Say if you have a horse in training with a pro and the horse is exhibiting less than desired behavior at an event, why isn't the trainer allowed to get on and work the horse. Not show the horse but school it?

clm08
Apr. 7, 2011, 04:27 PM
I am not an evener, but I have always wondered why no one else is allowed on the horse other than the rider who is showing the horse. Say if you have a horse in training with a pro and the horse is exhibiting less than desired behavior at an event, why isn't the trainer allowed to get on and work the horse. Not show the horse but school it?

I guess because this is eventing and not H/J?

Hilary
Apr. 7, 2011, 04:49 PM
Or dressage. Yes, you're competing, YOU are doing competing, not getting on the tuned up horse to go in the ring and hold it together for 2 minutes.

I don't know the origin of the rule, other than eventers tend to be far less reliant on trainers, AND going XC is not a dressage test or hunter round. YOU and ONLY YOU need to be riding and feeling your horse before you go out on course for safety reasons. We may take risks but we're not stupid!

I am happy about that rule - I think it's a a better test of what you and your horse are accomplishing if, even for 1 day, you have to do it yourself. People may argue that the trainer can ride the horse the other 6 days a week, so how "fair" is it (and as DW pointed out in another thread, life isn't fair), but that's not a good prep for eventing either.

If your horse isn't acting well at an event, the trainer can compete the horse.

SaddleUp158
Apr. 7, 2011, 04:50 PM
I guess because this is eventing and not H/J?

That is what I have always chalked it up to, but wondered if there was an actual reason behind it. I have never had a horse in training so haven't had a trainer at shows anyways- just good friends.

FlightCheck
Apr. 7, 2011, 04:55 PM
because we come from the cavalry roots, and if your warhorse was acting up you couldn't just ask the general to hop on and give him a good school ;)

bornfreenowexpensive
Apr. 7, 2011, 05:35 PM
Can you use the elastic neck-stretcher while lunging? I prefer it over typical side-reins for my horse who needs some stretchy-time, as he likes to dip behind traditional side-reins, and was a bit confused by the rule-book wording. It looks like the other option, my vienna reins, are not allowed - or is that just while riding?


A chambon is permitted and would do the same thing as your elastic neck-stretcher (which may very well be a chambon).

This is a useful one from Dover--It is a De gogue but you can take off the progned yoke and snap it to the bit instead and it turns into a chambon. Nicely made and it can come off without you taking off the bridle.

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-30059&ids=802543549


NOTE--this is a training aid that should only be used by someone experienced who knows how to introduce it and use it correctly. Otherwise, you can create more issues. I use it to help a horse with Kissing Spine build up his back muscles without the weight of a rider.

goodmorning
Apr. 7, 2011, 05:40 PM
Yes, it looks like a chambon is acceptable, maybe 'over-kill' but I will ask at my next. - first! :D - event if the neck stretcher is OK (and any other time I wish to use it @ a sanctioned event, the last thing I need is an E before I step foot in any ring!)

amastrike
Apr. 7, 2011, 06:15 PM
Is long-lining legal?

deltawave
Apr. 7, 2011, 06:25 PM
I believe you can use these gadgets if necessary before 3pm on the day before the competition starts, as well. Before the show "opens", you can do anything you want, including having your trainer school your horse.

Zoomd
Apr. 7, 2011, 09:56 PM
I am happy about that rule - I think it's a a better test of what you and your horse are accomplishing if, even for 1 day, you have to do it yourself.

:yes:

Dr. Doolittle
Apr. 7, 2011, 10:05 PM
Or dressage. Yes, you're competing, YOU are doing competing, not getting on the tuned up horse to go in the ring and hold it together for 2 minutes.

I don't know the origin of the rule, other than eventers tend to be far less reliant on trainers, AND going XC is not a dressage test or hunter round. YOU and ONLY YOU need to be riding and feeling your horse before you go out on course for safety reasons. We may take risks but we're not stupid!

I am happy about that rule - I think it's a a better test of what you and your horse are accomplishing if, even for 1 day, you have to do it yourself. People may argue that the trainer can ride the horse the other 6 days a week, so how "fair" is it (and as DW pointed out in another thread, life isn't fair), but that's not a good prep for eventing either.

If your horse isn't acting well at an event, the trainer can compete the horse.

Yes, seriously...

fooler
Apr. 7, 2011, 10:22 PM
I am not an evener, but I have always wondered why no one else is allowed on the horse other than the rider who is showing the horse. Say if you have a horse in training with a pro and the horse is exhibiting less than desired behavior at an event, why isn't the trainer allowed to get on and work the horse. Not show the horse but school it?

Eventing contests three separate disciplines, dressage, XC and SJ. This requires a certain self-reliance to be able to ride all three well. Also in the days of the LF on the speed/endurance day the horse & rider would be on course for up to 2 hours negotiating 2 roads & tracks, 1 steeplechase and the XC phase. There were 2 areas where the rider received outside input - the box at the end of steeplechase (for drink, injury and horseshoe check) and the 10 minute vet box between phases C & D.

The individual should be enough of a horseman to determine how to and whether to go forward.

whbar158
Apr. 7, 2011, 10:31 PM
I see part of why it also isn't a big deal at events. In the hunters those 2 minutes in the ring are very important and perfection is important. For the most part most of the riders in the hunter ring can get their horse around the ring in one piece just fine even if the horse isn't being perfect, it just may not be pretty. Since pretty isn't an important factor while jumping most people can get around, may have a problem, but will get to the finish line even if the horse is having a bad day. Like another said if the horse is being so bad that the owner can't get it to do right at all then they probably shouldn't go out on course.

So I wouldn't say that one is better than the other, they are just different and have different expectations. A horse can be tossing their head around, and sometimes at the hunter shows the trainer is getting on to see what the horse is doing as well, not just a schooling. Having done both, as well as work for my hunter trainer it is not all black and white.

SaddleUp158
Apr. 7, 2011, 10:59 PM
Thank you everyone for explaining why only the rider can get on the horse. Makes total sense why. I have only shown at breed shows so it is just from what I am used to (though, not to worry I always warm up my own horse, don't have a trainer).

IFG
Apr. 8, 2011, 07:46 AM
because we come from the cavalry roots, and if your warhorse was acting up you couldn't just ask the general to hop on and give him a good school ;)

Like!:lol: