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dogponyshow
Apr. 5, 2011, 10:35 PM
My husband put a piece of pressure treated wood into the wood stove, what to do now that it's already burning???

Ajierene
Apr. 5, 2011, 10:40 PM
Take it out of the fire if you can. Otherwise either douse the fire or risk the inhalation of chemicals used to treat the wood.

RAyers
Apr. 5, 2011, 10:47 PM
Hold your breath given the toxic chemicals used to treat the lumber. This includes forms of copper, arsenic, chromium. I would douse the fire, pull the wood out of the stove and get it out of the house.

There is a reason pressure treated woods are not allowed to be used in kitchens etc. where they can come into contact with food that is being cut. As a matter of fact, pressure treated woods can only be burned in commercial incinerators due to the arsenic content.

Reed

trinityhill
Apr. 5, 2011, 10:57 PM
Agreed on the kill the fire. And pop open some windows... cold or not... Nothing good in PT...

horsepoor
Apr. 5, 2011, 11:09 PM
I hope hubby understands why the stuff is bad and just inadvertently threw it on the fire? Otherwise, I was of a mind to suggest retrieving the piece of wood and putting the flame out on hubby's head, but I suppose that would be spousal abuse... and might burn the house down...

Alagirl
Apr. 6, 2011, 12:45 AM
if you inhale anything from the fire you are in trouble anyhow! :)

I am not up to date what new treatments are used in in woods, but last time I looked the chemical content was small to minute.

The fire chamber should not ever release anything into your living quarters! Or you's have problems with CO2 and CO poisoning!

coloredcowhorse
Apr. 6, 2011, 12:50 AM
My husband put a piece of pressure treated wood into the wood stove, what to do now that it's already burning???


Relax....one piece of wood in a closed wood stove (that shouldn't be venting into your living area anyway) is not going to do damage. Just ask him nicely not to do so again.

Of course, if 30 years from now you have some chronic and debilitating illness you can blame it on him and that one piece of wood.

JanM
Apr. 6, 2011, 07:18 AM
I agree with the others on here. Unless the smoke is coming in the house you'll be fine. But if it's older wood it was treated with all kinds of nasty stuff and skin contact to handle it and put it in the stove was a bad thing. I believe they used to use arsenic as part of the treatment, and people who were working with it did get poisoned. They haven't used the old method for at least 5 years so you could be safe, but I certainly would let the fire die down and totally clean it out, and safely dispose of the ashes.

dogponyshow
Apr. 6, 2011, 07:28 AM
Thanks all, a friend called the fire chief and he said to let fire burn out, keep house well ventilated, and dispose of ashes carefully. Stressful night!

Foxtrot's
Apr. 7, 2011, 12:56 AM
You cannot even burn them outside in a burnpile.

Alagirl
Apr. 7, 2011, 01:22 AM
You cannot even burn them outside in a burnpile.

well, yeah, you ain't supposed to.
But one piece in the stove won't kill ya.

PRS
Apr. 7, 2011, 05:18 PM
Seriously, there is very minute danger from one small piece of wood buring in your stove. In fact you are in more danger from a splinter getting infected than from inhaling a small amount of smoke from the burning wood. The dangers of wood pressure treated with Chromated Copper Arsenate has been grossly over exaggerated by special interest groups. The facts are that more kids are hurt by falling off the playground equipment or decks than were ever harmed by simple contact with the properly dried and installed pt wood.

RAyers
Apr. 7, 2011, 05:36 PM
Seriously, there is very minute danger from one small piece of wood buring in your stove. In fact you are in more danger from a splinter getting infected than from inhaling a small amount of smoke from the burning wood. The dangers of wood pressure treated with Chromated Copper Arsenate has been grossly over exaggerated by special interest groups. The facts are that more kids are hurt by falling off the playground equipment or decks than were ever harmed by simple contact with the properly dried and installed pt wood.

Sure the probability may be low, just like the workers at Fukushima who may or may not get cancer, but it REALLY sucks if you are the one.

Reed

Alagirl
Apr. 7, 2011, 06:20 PM
Sure the probability may be low, just like the workers at Fukushima who may or may not get cancer, but it REALLY sucks if you are the one.

Reed


:rolleyes:

IFG
Apr. 7, 2011, 08:39 PM
Just saw this. I wonder if your exposure to fumes is lower by leaving it to burn rather than opening the wood stove and releasing the fums into the house? Sort of like lead paint. Years ago, I did a stint working for the NYC Bureau of Lead Poisoning Control. In houses with lead paint, the NYC Lead Poisoning Bureau used to cover the paint with contact paper or fresh paint, rather than disturbing it and risk exposing kids to it.

Alagirl
Apr. 7, 2011, 08:45 PM
Just saw this. I wonder if your exposure to fumes is lower by leaving it to burn rather than opening the wood stove and releasing the fums into the house? Sort of like lead paint. Years ago, I did a stint working for the NYC Bureau of Lead Poisoning Control. In houses with lead paint, the NYC Lead Poisoning Bureau used to cover the paint with contact paper or fresh paint, rather than disturbing it and risk exposing kids to it.

Well, there are a bunch of bad things in the fumes and smoke as it it.

In a good wood burning stove - once it gets going - even opening the door should not make smoke come out into the living quarters.

cowgirljenn
Apr. 7, 2011, 09:06 PM
I asked the toxicologist who I happen to be married to who happens to have studied burning pressure treated wood.

His answer is that you should burn pressure treated wood - even in a good wood stove as it can still cause health problems.

HOWEVER one piece would not worry him. So breath a little easier. :)

Foxtrot's
Apr. 7, 2011, 09:07 PM
Did my comment indicate that I thought it was dreadful? Not intended, but it is a fact and the fire nazis will be onto anyone burning non-farm produced burn piles. Can't exactly say you are having a weiner roast, can we if it has treated lumber on it.