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ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 06:24 PM
It is springtime, and grass is not the only thing emerging from my soil.

I walked one of my pastures yesterday and another one today. I am still stressed about the things I found, and more importantly, the things I may have missed. Yesterday, I found an old metal post still in the ground that was broken off and emerging from the soil. If a horse had run over that, it would have sustained a terrible injury. I found a variety of old metal pieces and old glass in that pasture as well. This is a small pasture I have gone over with a fine tooth comb in the last two years, and this is new "old stuff."

Today, I was in another pasture and I stooped over to pick up an old plastic bottle cap that was emerging from the soil. This cap just happened to be laying in an area that must have been used as a burn spot for old lumber before, because I also found about 20 old rusty nails. After finding a few, I went back to the barn and got my magnet and a bucket. I found quite a few with the magnet, and I need to get a hardened rake out and rake the soil to find the rest. I also found some kind of hasp with a HUGE screw still intact in it. The hasp acted as a base to hold the screw outward and steady. Luckily, the screw was face down in the soil. I can't imagine the damage that one could also have done if it was pointed upward. I am still freaking out about that.

I then walked the fence lines and found a variety of garbage. The worst was a broken window pane near my neighbor's greenhouse. The greenhouse abuts my fence line, but is totally enclosed in plastic. The broken glass has obviously been there a while, and it was sticking out of the soil at angles and pieces were laying in about a two by two foot area. My horses had eaten the grass around it.

I have lived here for almost two years, and I have been pulling junk out of these pastures for two years. I think I have it all found, and then more just keep coming up. One of the best things I have done is to buy a magnet on wheels from TSC. I also bought a small harrow, and it has dragged up old metal fence posts and pieces of wire. I would be lost without these two pieces of equipment. I also mow my pastures and keep a close eye as I mow. I pick up every piece of trash I see, no matter how small it is.

Does anyone else have this problem? It seems to me that most people would, unless they have owned their land for a long time. When will this horrible, dangerous stuff stop emerging from the soil??? Whenever I walk the pastures, which I do several times a season, I fill up about a half a bucket with "new" old dangerous metal items and old glass.

JSwan
Apr. 4, 2011, 06:43 PM
The land I live on has been farmed for over 200 years. No matter how much cleaning up I do I still find things.

Sometimes it's cool stuff like arrowheads, musketballs or saltglazed pottery. Other times it's things like wire imbedded in a tree trunk, or trash some asshat has thrown out of a car window.

I walk pastures frequently, especially in spring after the freeze/thaw cycle has brought things up to the surface. I have one of those magnets on a stick things too.

kookicat
Apr. 4, 2011, 06:56 PM
I walk mine at least once a week. It's good exercise for me and the dogs. ;)

I've never found anything too hair-raising, but I do agree that it's worth checking.

Epona142
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:29 PM
Found a huge long coil of high tensile wire today, along with some glass...we've had lots of wind, the wire must have blown in from somewhere...weird..

fordtraktor
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:42 PM
Not to mention rocks. Pastures really do grow new rocks every year, I swear!

shea'smom
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:49 PM
We grow rocks here. It is very maddening.
the other day, we realized there was a very fine wire about 20 feet long, hanging down from the power lines. It wasn't electric thank goodness, but I was appalled at that one.

ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:51 PM
I walk mine at least once a week. It's good exercise for me and the dogs. ;)

I think I am going to walk more often like you do. I guess this is one advantage of the drought hurting my pastures so badly. It is much easier to see the soil. I guess I found my silver lining on last summer's drought!!

When I moved in two summers ago, the pastures were thick and fetlock deep or longer. I was in heaven ... until I found the coils of rolled up barbed wire the previous owner left in the fields, the metal poles laying in the grass, the 1000 or so nails I picked up from the in-pasture burn spot, and the NINETEEN leg breaking holes hidden in the pasture grass from where the previous owner pulled out a substantial fence and didn't fill the holes. I found the first hole when I stepped in it up to my knee!! Luckily, that was just before my horses arrived, so I didn't put them in that pastures untl I seriously rehabbed it. I filled all of the holes with small rocks since they were so deep. No way was I going to trust filling them with dirt. It took me about 40 bags of rock to do it.

I have had almost no time to ride since I moved here. Cleaning up the surprise junk from my pastures and fixing all the other surprises has taken a lot of time (I thought this place was in good shape and safe for animals - was I delusional??). I think it is now, until I find the next thing (sigh). However, I LOVE MY FARM, I LOVE MY FARM, I LOVE MY FARM ....

ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:59 PM
I walk mine at least once a week. It's good exercise for me and the dogs. ;)

I've never found anything too hair-raising, but I do agree that it's worth checking.

LOL, Kookicat! Weren't you the one who found a child in your pasture? That was pretty hair-raising and a great story at that!! I loved that thread!!

ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:11 PM
The land I live on has been farmed for over 200 years. No matter how much cleaning up I do I still find things.

Sometimes it's cool stuff like arrowheads, musketballs or saltglazed pottery.

JSwan, how cool to find arrowheads and musketballs! Do you live out East? Do you know anything more about the history of your farm?

I would love to find out the history of my place. It has an old tobacco barn on it, so about a 100?? years ago, my farm was a tobacco farm. I know it was still farmed for tobacco as recently as 20 or so years ago, because a lady who owns the local antique store told me she used to strip tobacco in my barn. I know there was also cattle and goats raised on it.

ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:14 PM
Not to mention rocks. Pastures really do grow new rocks every year, I swear!

Shea'smom and Fordtraktor, we grow rocks here in Kentucky too! I am using my collection from last year to build a nice fire ring. I suspect if I build something each year with them, I will have quite a few stone sculptures before I am through! Maybe I should just build a rock wall?

fivehorses
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:15 PM
Can't walk them quite yet...still about a foot of snow in them. But, I mow them, I walk them daily, I guess you could say I am out in them a lot.

I use to walk my old akita around the perimeter every day last summer and fall(she was getting older and didn't want her doing that on her own anymore). It got me in a very nice habit of taking time to walk.
As soon as the snow disappears, although my akita is no longer here, I still plan on walking the perimeter.

Actually, with my lousy neighbors, I have to...their kids built a tree fort in my lower pasture spooking the horses.
I don't have much old stuff to find fortunately, although in the first 10 years I did find odd things once in a while from a long time ago.

Now, I do it for pleasure, and to make sure the neighbors are not encroaching!

ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:16 PM
Found a huge long coil of high tensile wire today, along with some glass...we've had lots of wind, the wire must have blown in from somewhere...weird..

That is scary. A horse could really get caught in a loose coil of high tensile wire, and it sure we be a mess if you hit it with the lawn tractor!!

ToiRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:21 PM
Actually, with my lousy neighbors, I have to...their kids built a tree fort in my lower pasture spooking the horses.

I remember a thread where the neighbors built a tree fort in a pasture. Was that yours? Weren't these the people who rented and their kids made a ton of noise (or am I mixing up threads?)? If so, how is that going? I suppose they went inside for the winter, LOL.

deltawave
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:36 PM
Mostly what I find is deer bones, every time I harrow the dirt paddock. Hunters used our property a lot before we bought it, and that small patch was where they dressed the deer. The dog loves harrowing days. :)

JoZ
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:37 PM
My pastures are under about 1-2 FEET of water due to the latest flood. I think I will put off walking them for a while.

The floods do bring in some interesting things. Our pastures sometimes sprout daffodils and tulips -- or, later in the season, I'll go out to get a horse and come back with the horse AND a zucchini. We have not found too much else.

fivehorses
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:38 PM
LOl, the kids are back outside...even put up the trampoline and are out there screaming as usual on a daily basis. Yes, that was my thread! sadly.

JanM
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:43 PM
There are a lot of items that will rise eventually no matter how deep they're buried. Tires, empty tanks (which is why empty gas station tanks must be removed), rocks, bottles/glass, bricks, and wood will always come to the top. My house is new and the fill dirt they used, and the ground they disturbed pops up tons of rocks, pieces of 2x4 complete with nails, chunks of tree branch, and all kinds of plastic junk keep appearing. My previous house had a lot of bricks buried, and they never stopped appearing in the backyard where there wasn't grass. I think ground pickup is constant no matter where you live, or what kind of ground you have.

My late uncle had about 120 acres in Oklahoma, and he never stopped finding old rolls of barbed wire in the bushes and tall grass. Apparently some was partially buried or just dumped when they replaced the barbed wire years ago, and the installers just tossed it anywhere. And if the previous owners burned trash and dumped the remaining cans and junk then you'll never stop finding stuff every spring.

Epona142
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:15 PM
That is scary. A horse could really get caught in a loose coil of high tensile wire, and it sure we be a mess if you hit it with the lawn tractor!!

Yeah, to say I was "unhappy" to find it would be an understatement.

atr
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:42 PM
Oh, hah, hah. As soon as my fenceline emerges... we still have several feet of snow covering our fields. topped up by the 11 inches we had yesterday and we are due more at the end of the week. And the tractor is broken and the spare parts are apparently in Northern Japan.

Lieselotte
Apr. 5, 2011, 12:01 AM
I board at a place where the pasture is riddled with large holes and tunnels dug by ground squirrels. It used to really worry me but apparently not a single horse has injured itself by stepping into one. However, my horse cut herself twice rolling out there...

The first time it happened she still had her mane in a french braid from the previous day's ride. When I took her out of the pasture, I noticed that one of the strands of hair was sticking out. I opened the braid and the whole strand fell to the ground, it was crudely severed right at her crest. No one could explain it, no one had played a stupid joke and it was too rough and uneven a cut to be made by scissors or a blade. I searched as much of the pasture as possible, finding all kinds of junk and lots of half buried bailing twine (danger!!!) but nothing that could have cut her mane like that.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago... I get my mare from the pasture and she has a completely straight cut, two inches long, across her croup. WTH!?!? Fortunately it wasn't very deep but the hair had been shorn away, again fairly crudely, and there was a bit of bleeding. I got pretty upset because obviously she was rolling in a spot where something sharp was sticking out and next time that thing could do a lot more damage... The BM was fairly interested at first but not concerned enough to help me looking, sigh... It took me a few days going over all the spots my horse likes to roll in and I finally found it, or at least what I believe to be the culprit. It was the top of a soda can, just the round top, not the can itself, and it had split where the opening for drinking is. So imagine a thin metal circle with a U-shaped cutout, and one of the edges bent upwards. Yikes!

So now I don't require my horse to come to the gate anymore, I gladly walk to wherever she is and look for foreign objects on the way (found a fellow boarders cell phone last week!) I just wish the BO and BM would show more concern... Which leads me to the question: Who pays the vet bill when it's more than just a superficial cut???

Nancy!
Apr. 5, 2011, 12:04 AM
I've been walking and riding in our slowly melting pastures the last few weeks. Just yesterday when repairing fence (due to the huge snow load pulling off my insulators) I felt something on my leg. A chunk of old barbed wire about 3 feet long. Sure glad it was me and not my horses.

I've found all sorts of things as the place we bought was used as a dumping ground. Grossest thing was a used condom. :eek: I've found knives, wire, pieces of metal, plastic, plastic pots from a "grow op", bottles, and last year even found an old baby crib down in the mud of a water channel during low water time.

Just amazing what crap comes up after all these years. We've been here for 17 years and I'm still finding stuff.

Nancy!

KrazyTBMare
Apr. 5, 2011, 12:19 AM
Wow. The things you guys find in your pastures!!! The worst I find is a rock here or there.

Ive lived here for 5 yrs in July. There were horses here before we built (just a pole barn with dirt floors prior to us building the house, etc) and luckily the people who lived here didnt trash the place. The worst was pulling the old, broken PVC "hitching post" that they used for their outdoor wash rack. We could NOT get this sucker out of the ground even when digging around the concrete. So we ran a chain around the concrete and PVC pipe and hooked it up to the truck and pulled it out. Appears that they dug a hole and didnt like its location so dug another one next to it and filled in both holes with concrete. Needless to say, it was a BIG hole once we got it out. But really, thats the worst!

kalidascope
Apr. 5, 2011, 02:14 AM
Wow. The things you guys find in your pastures!!! The worst I find is a rock here or there.

Same here - and I'm feeling very grateful for it after reading these stories! The worst we have is rabbit holes to fill in.

2DogsFarm
Apr. 5, 2011, 06:55 AM
Fortunately, my pastures are converted corn/bean fields, so any funky debris got cleaned up by the farmer who leased the acreage before I bought it.

I still find a goodly amount of large rocks every Spring, brought up by the ground heaving as it thaws.
Useful for landscaping, not so much for my lawntractor's blades when I mow :no:

Unfortunately I live at the intersection of two pretty well-traveled roads, so I do get a ton of fast food trash, plastic bags, beer cans, etc.
I feel like posting signs saying:
"People!@&*# - this is not a landfill! Take your crap home to discard!"

JanM
Apr. 5, 2011, 07:33 AM
If there's any area that was filled in with supposedly clean fill dirt then you'll probably always have to concentrate on that area. "Clean Fill Dirt" is a total oxymoron, and is usually all types of junk with some dirt around it.

fordtraktor
Apr. 5, 2011, 07:56 AM
I board at a place where the pasture is riddled with large holes and tunnels dug by ground squirrels. It used to really worry me but apparently not a single horse has injured itself by stepping into one. However, my horse cut herself twice rolling out there...

The first time it happened she still had her mane in a french braid from the previous day's ride. When I took her out of the pasture, I noticed that one of the strands of hair was sticking out. I opened the braid and the whole strand fell to the ground, it was crudely severed right at her crest. No one could explain it, no one had played a stupid joke and it was too rough and uneven a cut to be made by scissors or a blade. I searched as much of the pasture as possible, finding all kinds of junk and lots of half buried bailing twine (danger!!!) but nothing that could have cut her mane like that.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago... I get my mare from the pasture and she has a completely straight cut, two inches long, across her croup. WTH!?!? Fortunately it wasn't very deep but the hair had been shorn away, again fairly crudely, and there was a bit of bleeding. I got pretty upset because obviously she was rolling in a spot where something sharp was sticking out and next time that thing could do a lot more damage... The BM was fairly interested at first but not concerned enough to help me looking, sigh... It took me a few days going over all the spots my horse likes to roll in and I finally found it, or at least what I believe to be the culprit. It was the top of a soda can, just the round top, not the can itself, and it had split where the opening for drinking is. So imagine a thin metal circle with a U-shaped cutout, and one of the edges bent upwards. Yikes!

So now I don't require my horse to come to the gate anymore, I gladly walk to wherever she is and look for foreign objects on the way (found a fellow boarders cell phone last week!) I just wish the BO and BM would show more concern... Which leads me to the question: Who pays the vet bill when it's more than just a superficial cut???

You do. Sorry, but things like the top of a soda can that take you three days of searching to find are Acts of God. I do the best I can but as you can tell from these stories, things happen in fields and it is not necessarily the BO's fault. For one, highly unlikely to be her can -- my fields get full of trash blown or thrown over the the subdivision on one side (the other side is a working ag farm). I walk the fields regularly but there's only so much you can do.

Not to mention that sometimes you just miss things and it isn't negligence. I found all sorts of things this spring after the snow melt I couldn't see last year when we had thick grass (we've only been here a year). I found one of those plastic temporary posts the former owner left strewn everywhere and a piece of fence wire, along with God knows how many rocks. And I SCOURED this place daily for a month before bringing the horses out. Even so I found stuff regularly as the horses ate the grass down and I spent more time out in the fields.

It took you three days to find that can, after all. If it was a big piece of barbed wire in plain sight, maybe the BO might be at fault. But in your situation? No way.

sk_pacer
Apr. 5, 2011, 09:41 AM
I won't be checking pasture for weeks.......it is there, somewhere, I can see a few posts and tops of posts bt no bare ground yet. Next comes the water which is going to be deep and probably never go away this year. There aren't too many oddities to be found anyway, just the odd plastic grocery bag that blew in from somewhere or got away from me when I take scraps and tinned food to the cats. Only 'oddity' I ever found was a jackknife that Dad lost decades ago by the barn and I remember when he lost it as he was grubbing around between the barn and the pumphouse looking for it; he wasnt even close, was where the chicken pen was.

ReSomething
Apr. 5, 2011, 11:18 AM
My very first purchase was a metal detector, but it doesn't do any good for the shards of pottery and glass.
The pigs root like crazy and they have uncovered all sorts of iron parts, stove parts, engine parts, harness bits, horse and pony shoes. And glass of course.
The coolest things we found was a brass number plate on a chain, probably worn by a cow, some entire soda bottles and medicine bottles, a whole12x12 area of coal chunks (which the pigs think are a real taste treat). All this is a result of the old house burning and then the shed and remnants being bulldozed all_over_the_place.
The mess is pretty much confined to about four acres (!) out of 15. Of course we found the remnants of a 30 year old car wreck in the back too, and we have lovely piles of rocks, old ones and new ones.

Nancy!
Apr. 5, 2011, 05:04 PM
SK-pacer: My husband lost a flashlight when baling hay one night. Looked all over the field for it with no luck. Three years later find it in a bale of hay from that year. Amazing how long it was out there.

Found a horseshoe last night on the path we use. Didn't see it until the horse hit it. No damage but I wonder why we don't see them when the come off and are shiny but find them when they are rusty and old.

Nancy!

chai
Apr. 5, 2011, 05:24 PM
JSwan, that is so cool. I have always wanted to find an arrowhead. Our farm dates back to the early 1800s and I have found all kinds of things in the pasture from hand hewn nails and door hinges to old horse shoes, a train engineer's insignia, old coins and even jewelry. The biggest mystery is the small marble marker on the ground outside our dining room with the initials J. A. P. inscribed on it. A family named Perley lived here in the 1800s so I wonder if it is one of them.

JSwan
Apr. 5, 2011, 05:47 PM
That is so cool, chai! Where I live is nothing special now, but it was once a thriving community. There were Ordinary's, bivouacs, entire armies marched on these roads. A skirmish at the train station led to the confederate victory at Manassas.

I wish I would find more pieces of history, and less trash. Of course, 100 years from now that trash would be bits of history, I guess. Hard to think of old wire and blue Wal Mart bags as historical, though.

I wonder if you could go through deed books or church records and find out more about the family.

mustanglover
Apr. 5, 2011, 05:49 PM
My place was a old farm, that thought trash removal meant putting it in the back yard and covering it up.

Its a constant process, a few things I have found:
Peanut butter jar not even opened
a fork
bowl and casserole dish
high heel
part of a rain coat
nails
old fence insulators
teddy bear (the pig refuses to let me throw it away)
glass

I walk my pasture every few days and we have been digging up areas and putting it in a dumpster. So far so good. Knock on wood.

I am still waiting to find the dead body to the high heel and rain coat.

sk_pacer
Apr. 5, 2011, 06:18 PM
SK-pacer: My husband lost a flashlight when baling hay one night. Looked all over the field for it with no luck. Three years later find it in a bale of hay from that year. Amazing how long it was out there.

Found a horseshoe last night on the path we use. Didn't see it until the horse hit it. No damage but I wonder why we don't see them when the come off and are shiny but find them when they are rusty and old.

Nancy!

Every so often we will pull an old workhorse shoe out of a field - lift the airseeder to turn and there is a huge, rustly old shoe hooked around a shank or worse wrapped around a shovel. There haven't been workhorses on this land since the late 30s/early 40s, so that shows how deep stuff can be driven and still resurface. More interesting stuff shows up in the grain fields than the pasture aside from shoes: old firebox wrenches (for the ash shaker), broken knotters from binders, assorted broken cogs from very old equipment, the odd spreader ring or busted tug chain.

Foxtrot's
Apr. 5, 2011, 06:37 PM
We have found several old workhorse shoes, too. This used to be part of the Hudson's Bay farm which I think is special. We found an old clothes iron which was heated on the stovetop, some old glass bottles. But none as old as some parts of the States. Our house at 96 years old is old for here, but not where a lot of you people live.

sk_pacer
Apr. 5, 2011, 08:16 PM
Nothing so special here, just parts were CP land, others regular. Both cousin and I have Century Farms and have been designated so for several years now. I have a house full of that stuff.....never threw anything away just in case........ *SIGH*

kelsey97
Apr. 6, 2011, 07:29 PM
I grew up on a farm that had been completely leveled by a tornado 30 something years before we bought it. From time to time we'd find things in the pastures: pieces of china, silverware, buttons, tin cans, etc.

suz
Apr. 6, 2011, 08:42 PM
my place was built in 1916 and there is a trash heap out by the brook. it's nuts how much junk is out there-broken glass, old toilets, car parts, bottles, etc.
a lot of it was added in 1988 when the house next door, which had burned, was bulldozed and the remains (cremains?) bulldozed onto my land. that neighbor sucks, no doubt.
luckily the pile is on the property line, and i have fencing around it to help keep people from hiking up the brook and into my yard.
it doesn't deter them al though, and once someone complained to me that tey had cut their foot while trespassing barefoot!

p.s. as a kid i grew up on the eastern edge of long island. we found lots of arrowheads and once a white beaded leather bag buried under about a foot of oak leaf loam. that was very cool imo.

Foxtrot's
Apr. 7, 2011, 12:36 AM
A beaded bag - Indian? How interesting.

I love hearing about the old houses with history. B.C. is relatively new and today is Vancouver's 125th birthday. They even had cake downtown

As an aside - remember the thread about what people found in their hay? :)