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skip916
Apr. 4, 2011, 10:28 AM
sally cousins gets the awesome bada** eventer award this week! wow!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5VLt0NfdMQ&feature=player_embedded#at=52

NeverTime
Apr. 4, 2011, 10:31 AM
She's officially one Tough Cupcake! :cool:

snoopy
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:12 AM
This has long been an issue with me....if a rider has to drop his/her head/eyes because heavy rain/hail is stinging then it is surely a problem for the horse who should be focusing on the fence. I see this as a problem....and I always have.

It is a horse's natural reaction to turn away from these types of conditions. I have ridden dressage tests where the horse curls and backs off the leg because it does not want to go forward into the rain. Add jumps to the mix and I feel this to adds danger to the equation.

I realize that eventing happens rain or shine and historically, unless there is lightening, we run the horses but I must say that I have WD when expected to run XC in blinding sheets of rain.

My own personal choice.

Lori B
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:34 AM
Buy that horse a beer too. Dang.

Ajierene
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:36 AM
Generally speaking, I would call that foolhardy. If the sleet started just as she left the startbox, then I can understand why she ran anyway, possibly thinking it would subside soon or something.

I surely would not advocate this kind of behavior/riding. This is a sport that most people do as a hobby and is in no way life or death to get to the end of the cross country course.

Divine Comedy
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:40 AM
I think they should have held her on course until it subsided, maybe let her find a tree to hide under.

Impressed with her toughness. Not sure it should have been needed.

LisaB
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:44 AM
It came on rather sudden. The rain was okay and then boom, hail. And just with a few wind whips. They did have a wait time for this little ditty and then we had another on the training course. And that one was a bit worse. I think one rider came back. Welcome to Spring Morven! The weather is always such a bugger.

JER
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:08 PM
Badminton '99 was run under those conditions. The second day of dressage and XC day looked just like that.

Mark Todd's test on Broadcast News was in the worst of it on Friday. Water poured off the brim of MT's hat on his salute; the poor horse did much of the test with his ears back to keep the rain out.

The score? A new record for dressage at Badminton.

XC day was a monsoon. Less than half the field completed. Not every horse was game for the conditions -- a lot of the Rs were because horses just quit.

One of the best rides of the day -- Kerry Milliken on Out and About -- was in the worst of the weather. The rain was so bad, most spectators had gone to seek shelter. But you wouldn't have known it watching that pair.

I think it's an individual taste thing.

Winston's Mom
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:16 PM
I agree with Ajierene, luckily they were safe but IMO it was foolish to continue on course. If there had been an accident she'd be blasted here for being reckless and it would've been yet another black mark for eventing.

JAM
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:39 PM
I also recall Badminton '92 was run under similar conditions and there were multiple horse fatalities, including Mr. Maxwell.


Badminton '99 was run under those conditions. The second day of dressage and XC day looked just like that.

Mark Todd's test on Broadcast News was in the worst of it on Friday. Water poured off the brim of MT's hat on his salute; the poor horse did much of the test with his ears back to keep the rain out.

The score? A new record for dressage at Badminton.

XC day was a monsoon. Less than half the field completed. Not every horse was game for the conditions -- a lot of the Rs were because horses just quit.

One of the best rides of the day -- Kerry Milliken on Out and About -- was in the worst of the weather. The rain was so bad, most spectators had gone to seek shelter. But you wouldn't have known it watching that pair.

I think it's an individual taste thing.

Cruiser12
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:48 PM
Rain is bad enough, but hail- ice underfoot and in the eyes- that's a bit excessive. Dressage in a sodden ring is at least still relatively safe.
The horse is obviously amazing though!

LLDM
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:05 PM
Awesome horse! But really am disappointed in ALL the people that let this happen. Flag them down and let 'em start again. But that was more foolhardy than brave. And a huge unnecessary risk to the horse.

And for all those who say "rider responsibility" rather than "regulation" - I give you this video.

SCFarm

LisaB
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:05 PM
It really wasn't slippery at all. My pregnant ass ran to my car after the last person in that division went over my fence. And THAT wasn't a pretty sight.
They did indeed stop during the worst of the spurt but it wasn't that cold and it didn't stick on the ground.
Believe me, these folks would have pulled up if they thought it was at all dangerous. And the organizers worked the quickest on stopping and starting that I've ever seen.
Give it a rest folks, you weren't there. It sucked to be out in it. But hazardous? no.

scubed
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:08 PM
Believe me, these folks would have pulled up if they thought it was at all dangerous. And the organizers worked the quickest on stopping and starting that I've ever seen.
Give it a rest folks, you weren't there. It sucked to be out in it. But hazardous? no.

+1

SLR
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:33 PM
Thank you Lisa B Sally Cousins is one special rider, and she and her husband treat their horses like babies and would never risk their well being. Ajierene, please stop throwing stones when you don't know of which you speak. Please look at Sally's accomplishments.

Ajierene
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:17 PM
Thank you Lisa B Sally Cousins is one special rider, and she and her husband treat their horses like babies and would never risk their well being. Ajierene, please stop throwing stones when you don't know of which you speak. Please look at Sally's accomplishments.

Can you show me exactly where I was throwing stones? I expressed my opinion and will continue to do so where I see fit. I think it is foolhardy to run in such conditions and I am not the only one that feels that way.

This is what bothered me so much about what, I believe it was Boyd Martin, said after Fairhill International in 2009 (?). There was torrential rain to the point where the horses were in standing water in their stalls and he said something to the effect that everyone who withdrew from cross country day were chickens. This is a sport, it is a hobby. There is NO reason to run in such adverse conditions.

I have competed in the rain, high winds, mud and general bad weather. To the extreme of standing water in the stalls, ice in your face or weather otherwise very adverse there is no point. This is NOT life or death....not until someone let's their ego or need to compete get the better of them.

This is not necessarily a reflection on Sally Cousins, more a reaction to the idea that running in such conditions or running when you are injured is somehow 'brave' or 'better than others'. It is not, it is foolhardy and can be dangerous.

VicariousRider
Apr. 4, 2011, 05:53 PM
I expressed my opinion and will continue to do so where I see fit. I think it is foolhardy to run in such conditions and I am not the only one that feels that way.


Of course you are entitled to your opinion. However, our sport is one where the exercise of judgement is at least 75% of the the test. Every time we approach a fence, send in an entry or make a fitness plan we are exercising that judgment. I do agree that weather is something that must be taken into account, nevertheless.

After watching that video, knowing that the horse and rider have competed above that level numerous times and hearing form eye-witnesses that the ground remained safe I do not seriously question Sally's decision to run. That said, I am generally VERY conservative on most matters and I probably would not have made the same decision given my own sense of where the boundaries are. But I am also not NEARLY the rider that Sally is nor do I have her extensive experience to draw on in making my judgments.

yellowbritches
Apr. 4, 2011, 06:02 PM
The weather on Saturday at Morven was bizarre. I was there, most of the day, and know just how tough the day was. The weather went back and forth between pleasant and sunny to brutal and back again within, quite literally, minutes. Our BN horse and kid left the trailer to go do dressage in sunshine and 50ish temps. In about the span of 10 minutes during his warm up it went from pleasant to hailing, very cold, and windy. The kid's saint of a horse turned his tail to the wind, and toughed it out (I was very upset I hadn't brought his cooler down, but there was ZERO reason to when they left the trailer). Our kid gets major kudos as he toughed it out, went in and rode his best test to date in a HAILSTORM, in front of Marylin Payne and scored beautifully, and earned every score she gave him and totally earned the "Great attitude!" comment in the collectives!

The day was so, so strange. It would have been very hard to decide if riders should be stopped or not. However, I will say that not once did the footing get icy (it didn't get muddy enough for us to scratch, either). It was HAIL, not sleet. Nothing you can do about it at a busy event, and at no point do I think anyone thought the footing got treacherous. It sucked at times, but I never considered it unsafe.

seeuatx
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:05 PM
Wow... great ride in horrible conditions. Definitely wins Bada$$ Rider of the Week in my book. I say that as I sit on my couch instead of at the barn because I hate riding in T-storms even with an indoor. I will if I have to, but I don't tonight ;)

enjoytheride
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:14 PM
When it hails at the barn we run all the horses into the arena since we've gotten golfball sized hail here before. I think the risk of injury with hail is much higher then just rain or even snow. I wouldn't want to ride in it although I have evented in rain before.

LLDM
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:08 PM
I think Snoopy makes the relevant point. If the rider is having trouble seeing - and you can clearly see in the video clip where she is trying to wipe her eyes - how well can the horse see?

I am truly glad it worked out. I have nothing against the rider.

SCFarm

kt-rose
Apr. 4, 2011, 08:29 PM
[QUOTE=LisaB;
Believe me, these folks would have pulled up if they thought it was at all dangerous. And the organizers worked the quickest on stopping and starting that I've ever seen.
Give it a rest folks, you weren't there. It sucked to be out in it. But hazardous? no.[/QUOTE]

+2!!! Good grief people...:rolleyes: I live nearby and was caught by the same weather out hacking my hunt horse. I got a little wet, my horse barely noticed, the visibility was fine and the footing unaffected. The hail was small and brief, as LisaB said, it sucked to be caught in it but there was nothing dangerous about it. Wacky weather day...