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View Full Version : Speak to me of half leases....



TatteredDaydreamer
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:42 AM
Something I'm considering in the very near future. I don't have the funds to lease/buy my own right now but I'm seriously missing the saddle time. How much(feel free to estimate or round) did you pay per month? Which services did it include/not include? How much did you get to ride? Were you happy with how it worked out? Would you do it again? Advice? Tips?

Across Sicily
Apr. 4, 2011, 02:42 AM
I half leased for... hmm... 7 or 8 months.
I paid a significant chunk of money, but it was approx half the cost of board with lessons at my barn, and the instruction and facilities are top notch. Plus, the horse was a schoolmaster and taught me a LOT. The barn is a known show barn as well so that factored in. If you are interested in straight numbers please PM me. I will say that the cost was 110% worth it.

Included were vet, shoes, board, blankets, tack (I had my own saddle and various other things, but could have used the barn's) and one lesson per week. If I wanted to take two - and I usually did - I paid for the second lesson on top of the half lease cost. I could - and did - show the horse as well for no additional "lease" fees.

Though I was supposed to have 3 to 4 days a week, if I really wanted to they were never opposed to me riding more. At the time, however, there wasn't anyone else half leasing the same horse. This worked out quite nicely during horse show season and I would often ride five days a week including the days we showed. I got quite lucky in that regard, though - I doubt very much all half leases are like that!

I am THRILLED with my half leasing experience. I leased directly from my barn, and it was more or less the easiest thing ever. I occasionally had to arrange days around times when the horse was used for the odd lesson, but that was about it. I treated the horse more or less as my own, got to show plenty, hack, take lessons... it was great! If I were in the market for another half lease I'd do it again in a minute.

Advice and tips...
Well, look around.
Generally if you're half leasing, you're not going to be able to move the horse if there's something about the barn you don't like. So... make sure that you like the instruction (if you're planning on lessoning) and the facilities. If you're interested in showing, be sure that the owner of the horse will let you show, and find out the various costs (from the owner's end, if any, and the barn's end for shipping/coaches' fees/whatever else) associated.
Of course, you also want to make sure you like the horse! Ride the horse a time or two, make sure the owner isn't a crazy, and get everything in writing (specifics of lessons, amount of riding, showing, whatever). Most half leases I know require a 30 day notice if you're planning on taking off.

karlymacrae
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:51 AM
We half leased out a B circuit childrens hunter for $315 per month for 3-4 days a week plus cost of shoes (190, all fours). We allowed her to use all of the tack we had for that horse (saddle, bridle, boots, brushes, a few saddle pads, blankets etc) but she had a lot of her own. Lessons were separate and she paid all of her own showing fees.

It really, really depends on your area, the horse (quality, training), the barn you're at, etc etc. You'll just have to find something that works for you.

Half leasing is a wonderful opportunity. If you find one you're interested in, go for it. And yes, I would half lease out one of my horses again. It was a good experience for all parties involved.

jewll27
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:12 AM
I half lease my horse when the right person is interested. Its $300/month plus half of the farrier costs. That includes 3 lessons a week, his own tack (except saddle if they have their own) and things (blankets, saddle pads, polos, hoof paint, etc.), supplements, the possibility to show if they want. Farrier costs at the moment are $45/6 weeks b/c hes barefoot but hes gonna have shoes put on soon so it will be $90/6 weeks.

Rel6
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:47 AM
Half leases can be great, but be prepared to be assertive if needed.

I had a friend half lease and they would last minute change days around based on the owners availability (the days were also pre-stated in the contract.)

She was too timid to say anything and would get very frustrated. Finally she said something and it stopped. I think the owner even apologized, not realizing it had been a problem.

Make sure everything is ironed out in the contract, and that you like the horse. Other than that you should be good to go!

(Also, I do know a lot of people who half leased and ended up getting much more saddle time than they expected. Don't bank on it, but a lot of people are half leasing their horses out because they don't have the time.)

Ibex
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:58 AM
I half leased for years... saw both good and bad! Best scenario was when I half leased my trainer's ex-PSG dressage mare. She used the other half for lessons etc, and was leasing for business reasons (didn't ride the mare herself any more, needed to earn her keep). Worked out beautifully.

Leasing from private owners is a lot tougher... make sure you feel you can work with the owner. I generally found that leasing from someone with time constraints worked better than leasing from someone with money constraints - too often I felt resented by an owner who didn't really want to lease but couldn't afford it otherwise... the owners with time constraints were delighted that someone was paying attention to their horse when they couldn't. It's not always like that, but it can be...

KateKat
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:16 PM
I half leased and it was a great experience. Probably did it for about 7 months before purchasing my own.

Costs were half of board, shoes, and then half training (since I was leasing a horse in my trainer's program, had to take lessons). Two lessons a week, plus one day of hack time. The owner was kind of absentee, so there were never any time conflicts.

I would totally do it again, because like I said, I had a relatively pain and hassle free lease arrangement. The horse was a great confidence builder and learning experience and without doing the lease with this particular horse, I doubt I would have ended up with the horse I purchased!

The only thing I didn't do that I would do this time around is get a written contract. I know, I know, it was probably a little stupid to not do it in the first place. But, the horse was at my trainer's barn, the trainer had known the owners forever and if something had happened, the owners would probably not have done any weird life saving measures (not a high value horse) and it was pretty clearly spelled out what I was responsible for. But, just to protect yourself even in a situation where you think all the partites will trust each other, get a contract.

jrzeqrider
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:14 PM
I've half leased my horse out. Lessee paid for half of board, half of shoes, half of worming/shots/dentist/expected vet stuff. We (well really my mom) paid for the other half along with any emergency vet stuff. He was leased out to a girl who was riding with my trainer, taking lessons once a week, and had two other days/week to ride.

Celeritas
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:35 PM
I half leased for a while a few years ago. It was my trainer's horse, so it was an easy arrangement. I paid half board ($325), and also paid for shoes and his monthly Adequan (~$40/month). I got to ride 3 days a week, use of all his equipment, got the 'boarder' rate for lessons, and did not have to pay a daily lease fee for shows.

I would definitely recommend it, as my riding improved dramatically with the consistent time in the saddle (prior to leasing, I was taking one lesson a week, and catching hacks on boarder's horses when available). Definitely make sure to get all details agreed upon (who will be paying for what, if you will have a set riding schedule and how you will deal with scheduling changes, etc.), my agreement wasn't in writing but I would certainly recommend it.

Bogie
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:38 PM
I've been on both sides of the lease situation. Some have worked really well, others not so much.

Communication is key and I highly advocate putting everything in writing at the beginning. It really helps to clarify what everyone expects.

Leases also work better when the people who ride the horse share similar riding styles and objectives.

Here are two posts on my blog that address the issue.

Sharing your horse: The Ps & Qs of Free Leases (http://equineink.com/2008/04/18/sharing-your-horse-the-ps-and-qs-of-free-leases/)

Free Leases: What should you Expect (http://equineink.com/2010/10/10/free-leases-what-should-you-expect/)

kahhull
Apr. 4, 2011, 10:19 PM
I'm half leasing a horse right now and it's the perfect setup for me. I don't have the funds or time to dedicate to my own horse or a full lease right now, but still wanted to be on a horse and taking lessons/showing a little. I pay around $500 a month for 2-3 rides (including a lesson) each week. This is on the San Francisco peninsula, and I can see from other posts this is a bit more expensive than most others are paying (hopefully that horse enjoys his view and mild climate, as well as the fact that he's pooing on some of the most expensive real estate in the country... aye). However, that includes pretty much everything - board, tack, arena and trail use, shoes, vet, etc. Sometimes I pitch in on some extras but for the most part that's my flat monthly fee before shows.

I've had a great experience with half leases and think it's a great way to keep horses in your life when time and money are tight. It's also a good way to ride a greater variety of horses, since you might half lease something you might not necessarily buy and learn some new stuff.

TatteredDaydreamer
Apr. 5, 2011, 01:41 AM
Thanks everyone! I stumbled upon a VERY reasonable half lease by signing into here for the first time since December. LOL I hope to head up to visit the farm and horse this weekend. Sounds like it's everything I'd be looking for, the only thing I hate is that I'm going to be wicked rusty as I haven't ridden since last fall.:(

karlymacrae
Apr. 5, 2011, 05:16 AM
Thanks everyone! I stumbled upon a VERY reasonable half lease by signing into here for the first time since December. LOL I hope to head up to visit the farm and horse this weekend. Sounds like it's everything I'd be looking for, the only thing I hate is that I'm going to be wicked rusty as I haven't ridden since last fall.:(

Good luck! And don't worry about being rusty. I bought a new 1.20 horse in January and I hadn't ridden all winter. Trying him was extremely embarrassing!!

Ray
Apr. 5, 2011, 06:23 AM
good luck with your new lease opportunity!

I half-leased and most of it was fantastic. as folks have said, you want to have a contract. one thing it should specify is vet bills - who pays for what and insurance. you also want to consider who is the other half - is it the owner ? another leasee ? the trainer ? make sure you can work with them and that they are committed to good communication.

TrakeGirl
Apr. 5, 2011, 07:28 AM
The only way I can afford (both time and $$) to keep my horse at my nice barn with all the ammenities is to half lease him out.

I charge half the board plus an extra $50/mo together as a lum sum at the beginning of the month. The extra $50 is to cover expenses like shoeing, vet, Adequan shots, etc. I find it easier to just charge one price so they can write one check rather than chase after them each time the vet or farrier is there so they can pay half of that.

It has been a good experience overall, but my biggest complaint at the moment is that my half leaser actually rarely rides. I know this is probably a rare situation, but I am one of those full time job ammies that not only half leases for $$, but because I can't get out there 5 days a week. When the weather is crap and they aren't getting out (like this week), it is nice to know your horse is getting out of his stall. I have been let down time and time again when the leaser doesn't ride on her lease days...so I get to pull out a snorting dragon horse bc he's only gotten indoor arena turnout for 3 straight days. Sigh.

We are ending the lease this month, mainly because of this issue and because we have another more dedicated rider wanting to half lease him that I think will work out better.

PaintPony
Apr. 5, 2011, 11:06 AM
I have experience on both ends of this and have both good and bad experiences.

The frustrating part of leasing a horse is that you often don't get any say in how the horse is cared for. I did end a lease early once (on a horse I really liked!) because the owner was not willing to keep it shod/cared for properly. I just couldn't deal anymore.

Have also had experience with half leasing out my own horse. One person always paid on time but hardly ever rode. Not sure what her deal was. Another person I found out was doing things with my horse that I had specifically asked her not to. She got kicked off the lease immediately with no refund.

It's not always bad though. I have had some great experiences as well. :)

Bogie
Apr. 5, 2011, 11:13 AM
The frustrating part of leasing a horse is that you often don't get any say in how the horse is cared for. I did end a lease early once (on a horse I really liked!) because the owner was not willing to keep it shod/cared for properly. I just couldn't deal anymore.


Or, as someone leasing a horse finding out that they are not caring for your horse in the way that you require.



Have also had experience with half leasing out my own horse. One person always paid on time but hardly ever rode. Not sure what her deal was. Another person I found out was doing things with my horse that I had specifically asked her not to. She got kicked off the lease immediately with no refund.


Been there too and also ended the lease.

In some regards leasing from a barn is the simplest (but not the least expensive) because there is less emotion involved. Owners and leasers tend to get very attached to the horse and that can lead to issues because you know that in the horse world, everyone has an opinion!

On the flip side, I leased a horse for about 3 years and had a blast with him. The owner seemed very happy with how he came along.

I also half leased one of my horses to the same woman for several years. She was great -- responsible, nice, tactful rider, etc. Eventually she bought her own horse.