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okggo
Apr. 2, 2011, 01:39 PM
So we are looking at property and MO seems like acres upon acres upon acres of barbed wire.

One of the places we like has approx 100 acres of BRAND new fenced and cross fenced barbed wire. Nice in the sense that we have metal posts, crappy in that who wants to take down all that fence and replace.

Those of you that purchased old cow property, what did you do? I was wondering if we offered the barbed wire free to anyone who came and took it down? Then I have visions of someone injuring themself, and the potential liability.

Thoughts?

Bluey
Apr. 2, 2011, 02:35 PM
So we are looking at property and MO seems like acres upon acres upon acres of barbed wire.

One of the places we like has approx 100 acres of BRAND new fenced and cross fenced barbed wire. Nice in the sense that we have metal posts, crappy in that who wants to take down all that fence and replace.

Those of you that purchased old cow property, what did you do? I was wondering if we offered the barbed wire free to anyone who came and took it down? Then I have visions of someone injuring themself, and the potential liability.

Thoughts?

We have miles of five wire barbed wire fences here, for cattle and horses and rarely have had an injury.
Then, we manage for it, don't just have little pens fenced with it, add hot wire over the top in the small traps and protect the corners with panels.

Barbwire really is not that aggressive as to jump at someone and attack out of the blue, when you are not looking.:eek:

100' of barwire?
You can just buy 10 10' panels and wire them to that fence to protect your horses at less cost than removing that little stretch, or remove it, should not take you an hour and then put whatever you like there.:)

Where'sMyWhite
Apr. 2, 2011, 02:51 PM
IMO, big pastures with barbed are a non-issue.

My 2 mares are on 20ac fenced/cross-fenced in barbed with no problems.

The only time I have had a problem with barbed was when my silly younger mare had to back up to the gelding pasture to tease the boys and cut her hind leg.

Other than that, no problems.

mayfair
Apr. 2, 2011, 02:54 PM
We added hot wire in front of the barbed wire rather than take it all down. Someday we might redo the fence but for now adding the hotwire was cheapest and easiest. We have a small pasture so the barbed wire is a concern. Like others, I don't think it would be much of an issue in a large pasture with plenty of grass.

okggo
Apr. 2, 2011, 02:59 PM
"Barbwire really is not that aggressive as to jump at someone and attack out of the blue, when you are not looking.:eek:"

As someone who has cut myself on the stuff before...you do have to be really careful handling it if you don't have the right tools. It rips skin fairly easily.

"You can just buy 10 10' panels and wire them to that fence to protect your horses at less cost than removing that little stretch, or remove it, should not take you an hour and then put whatever you like there.:)" - This is 100 acres of barbed wire, not 100 feet.

I wondered that too - with so much land is it as big a risk.

NoDQhere
Apr. 2, 2011, 03:11 PM
Barb wire is just miserable to work with. Heavy leather gloves are a must. On our farm, also pretty large, we capped all the steel posts and ran a strip of Horse Guard Electric Tape on top of any barb wire. It has worked fine. Only our perimeter fence still has some barb, we did take down any barb cross fences. Just too much risk, IMO. You might be able to give it away.

I know many people with huge pastures fenced in barb that have never had an injury. But I also know of more than one horse crippled by it. Of course people with thousands of acres to fence really have no choice.

coloredcowhorse
Apr. 2, 2011, 03:38 PM
40 acres fenced and cross fenced with it....keeps the mustangs and the range cattle out (real problems here). Put hot wire/tape on 8 inch extended insulators on the inside is one good way to deal with it. My horses are all extremely well fence-trained and don't go near the fences. It is hard to control as it is taken down but I have done some older fences and then used the wire to make western themed Christmas wreathes for ranch gates (sell for nice prices but I always end up looking like I was in a fight with a whole pride of lions even with good leather work gloves!)

KBC
Apr. 2, 2011, 03:40 PM
Barbwire really is not that aggressive as to jump at someone and attack out of the blue, when you are not looking.:eek:



:lol::lol: But it does if you are working with it, darn sttuff.

I'm shocked to read so many people who are not horrified by the existence of barbed wire, I'm usually the lone voice being shouted at and down.

We have 1500 acres, and the horses have to share the grazing land with the cows, all the big fields are 4 or 5 strand barb wire, the smaller paddocks that still have barb have a hot wire inside them, the smallest of them are hot wired.

I have no alternative, the big fields will always be wired just out of practicality, but we are gradually working on getting some safe small turnout areas set up around the yard.

Bluey
Apr. 2, 2011, 04:33 PM
I would never tell others to use barbwire, sure they would have an accident with it.:eek:

BUT, I have seen more accidents with all other kinds of fences than I have ever with barbwire.
Those I saw with barbwire were at the vet, being treated and I don't know why they got hurt, if the fences were badly managed, not that they were barbed wire.
One big no-no with barbed wire is to have horses across of each other, because if one paws at the other, it may get into the fence.
It seems that horses just don't seem to have the kind of common sense to know that.
Several neighbors at times use pastures next to ours and they always call first, to be sure we don't have any horses across the fence there.

I was just reminded that maybe at times barbwire does grab for you.
I was crawling thru the fence after opening the gate to let the horses out a few days ago and my lower pant leg hung up, cutting my pants and my leg right over the ankle and below the knee, cutting my leather glove and also my hand.
The lower leg cut probably could have used stitches, but it is healing fine with bandaids.
I am on nine years of ten with my last tetanus shot, so I assume good to go there too.;)

So, yes, there are times barbwire will attack, but I was asking for it right then.:p

Our old vet used to say that horses were hurt less with barbed wire because they respect it and it hurts, when other wire, barbless, cable, hot wire, baling wire, can cut them and they won't notice it right off, before it does much damage.

ANY wire or fences, really are places where a horse can get hurt if it tangles with it, or hits it hard enough.

Wire of any kind should be the last of our choices for smaller areas, but for larger ones, if you can't spent what it takes for other so much more expensive kinds of fencing, maybe barb wire is a sensible option, if managed properly.

HydroPHILE
Apr. 4, 2011, 10:20 AM
One Vet says one thing....our Vet says she's seen more accidents with horses and barbed wire than she ever wanted to see. If I ever had barbed wire on my property, it'd be replaced. A "lovely" experience with a horse getting spooked by another and running through a "small section of barbed wire, covered up by trees and growth" and a $$$$ Vet bill has me anti-barbed wire.

I've heard people say, "well my horse is smart enough to know better" or "my horse respects fences," but even the most respectful horse that is spooked beyond belief has accidents.

Tiki
Apr. 4, 2011, 10:59 AM
I can't imagine taking it down - especially that much. I'm sure the wire with the barbs on it is just stiff enough to whip around and slash my face if I were to ever try.

Is there any way, with the metal posts, to run a rail across the top of the wire - either wood or some kind of tubular thing for better visibility? and the also run a wire offset of 6-8 inches with a hot wire inside?

Bluey
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:11 AM
One Vet says one thing....our Vet says she's seen more accidents with horses and barbed wire than she ever wanted to see. If I ever had barbed wire on my property, it'd be replaced. A "lovely" experience with a horse getting spooked by another and running through a "small section of barbed wire, covered up by trees and growth" and a $$$$ Vet bill has me anti-barbed wire.

I've heard people say, "well my horse is smart enough to know better" or "my horse respects fences," but even the most respectful horse that is spooked beyond belief has accidents.

I think that comes down to management.
Any badly built and kept fence can cause injuries or loose horses.

If your fences in GA are like the ones we had in AL many years ago, I can see why horses get hurt on them, they were very sorry, a few strands of all kinds of material here and there, loose wire, some smooth, some barbed, an accident waiting to happen.
One place had all barbwire, two or three strands and loopy, little 30' by 40' pens on steel posts, no corners, the wire hanging and horses across from each other.:eek:

Still, in the time I was there, no horse was injured in that.:confused:

Here in the West, most barbed wire fences are five wire, tight and secure and not hiding in brush or beween trees.
In 40 years here, we only had two light cuts and in the 100+ years raising all kinds of horses here, I think you can count on one hand any injuries and those would have happened no matter which fence you had, like a mountain lion running some yearlings thru a fence once.

Sure, if you don't have to use it around horses, if you have other ways to fence your horses, of course there are better fences.

If that fence is already there and in good repair and not in a hidden spot, where something may run into it and no horses across that fence to play and get into it, why not work with what you have?

Now, if you really only have 100', I will say, wire is very hard to keep tight in that short a distance.
You either have to stretch it until it almost breaks, or it will just not stay tight very long.
100' is such a short distance, it is hardly worth worrying about it.
Take it down and put something you won't have by any chance need to regret later, if something gets into it.

One of the worst injuries I saw was a horse flipping over a nice board fence and degloving from his knee to into his shoulder.
He fell into a snow drift, or he may just have broken his neck also.:(

grayarabpony
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:19 AM
We added hot wire in front of the barbed wire rather than take it all down. Someday we might redo the fence but for now adding the hotwire was cheapest and easiest. We have a small pasture so the barbed wire is a concern. Like others, I don't think it would be much of an issue in a large pasture with plenty of grass.

This is your most practical solution. When I was in college I boarded at a farm that came with barb wire when the owners got it. They had big pastures but ran hot wire inside anyway and did not have problems.

Even in a big pasture, I would not just have barbed wire. I know someone who lost her horse to barbed wire and have seen another horse cut all over by it.

NoDQhere
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:16 PM
I can't imagine taking it down - especially that much. I'm sure the wire with the barbs on it is just stiff enough to whip around and slash my face if I were to ever try.

Is there any way, with the metal posts, to run a rail across the top of the wire - either wood or some kind of tubular thing for better visibility? and the also run a wire offset of 6-8 inches with a hot wire inside?

This is where the use of the Horse Guard tape is so "handy". You buy t post caps. The caps have a bracket that holds the tape. It is an inch and a half wide so very visible. The whole process is quick, cheap and easy and will turn an "accident waiting to happen" fence into a safe fence.

SMF11
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:25 PM
Since you don't own the property yet, you *could* make it a condition of sale that all the barbed wire is removed. Just a thought.

(You could ask that the posts remain).

Phaxxton
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:42 PM
Since you don't own the property yet, you *could* make it a condition of sale that all the barbed wire is removed. Just a thought.

(You could ask that the posts remain).

I think this is a really good idea. :yes: If you really don't want it (and I wouldn't want it either), ask in the offer that the sellers to take it down before closing.

shakeytails
Apr. 4, 2011, 12:54 PM
While I'd never install barbed wire, I can (and do) live with what was already here when I bought the place. I've replaced a lot of it, and small pastures are barbed wire free (that's where the young stupid horses are)but it remains along 3 sides of the big pasture, where the old mares spend their time. Injuries are rare and minor- horses usually don't mess with fence in large areas. I really don't have a problem with the stuff in certain situations.

AnotherRound
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:01 PM
100' of barwire?
You can just buy 10 10' panels and wire them to that fence to protect your horses at less ...d then put whatever you like there.:)

LOL - not 100 feet - she said 100 acres!

But I certainly would consider if the areas are big that the wire would not be a problem, and that adding a hot wire just inside it would be appropriat, along with panels on the corners, or where they might come to the fence on a regular basis. But my evaluation would be subjective to the particular place.

Bluey
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:14 PM
LOL - not 100 feet - she said 100 acres!

But I certainly would consider if the areas are big that the wire would not be a problem, and that adding a hot wire just inside it would be appropriat, along with panels on the corners, or where they might come to the fence on a regular basis. But my evaluation would be subjective to the particular place.

Thank you for making that clear, at 100' it didn't make much sense not to just change that bit of fence anyway.:p

At 100 acres, if that is a good, tight fence, without sharp corners, or half hidden in bushes and trees, the easiest for now seems to be to add hot wire to it somehow and keep a clear, larger path mowed and short around it, so horses learn it is there.

Zarafia
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:39 PM
My farm is a tenth of the size of the one in question, but was perimeter fenced with barbed wire when we bought it. I took all the barbed wire down by hand before we moved the horses here. I rolled it up, tied the rolls (small ones, lots) off and took them to the dump. Today if I had to do it over I'd advertise them for free on cl, but I'd still take it down myself. That way I know it's all gone.
My neighbor up in Live Oak had a 40 acre pasture fenced with BW. His horses lived there for many, many years with no problem. They were older appys and well used to it.
Then about six months before I moved his sweet old mare (28, I think) somehow got a leg caught in the fence. Imagine someone cutting a hind leg off, most of the way, above the hock, with a chain saw.
I will never forget the sight of that poor, sweet mare, still alive. Nor will I ever forget the sound of the two shotgun blasts it took to take her pain away.
It's a personal thing, I guess. But my subconscious will not let me put horses out in barbed wire.

Bluey
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:09 PM
My farm is a tenth of the size of the one in question, but was perimeter fenced with barbed wire when we bought it. I took all the barbed wire down by hand before we moved the horses here. I rolled it up, tied the rolls (small ones, lots) off and took them to the dump. Today if I had to do it over I'd advertise them for free on cl, but I'd still take it down myself. That way I know it's all gone.
My neighbor up in Live Oak had a 40 acre pasture fenced with BW. His horses lived there for many, many years with no problem. They were older appys and well used to it.
Then about six months before I moved his sweet old mare (28, I think) somehow got a leg caught in the fence. Imagine someone cutting a hind leg off, most of the way, above the hock, with a chain saw.
I will never forget the sight of that poor, sweet mare, still alive. Nor will I ever forget the sound of the two shotgun blasts it took to take her pain away.
It's a personal thing, I guess. But my subconscious will not let me put horses out in barbed wire.

Yes, terrible that happened to that mare, but to say that is because it was barbed wire, well, I saw a three year old colt break a leg when he slipped while running and caught a leg in a very nice wood fence.
Sometimes, it is not the fence.
Following that reasoning, I guess we just should not keep horses, because they will get hurt somewhere.

Our old vet told us he saw more injuries from smooth wire than ever from barbed wire and most wire here is barbed.

Barbed wire is not ideal, but it can be made to work about as well as you need to sometimes.

Zarafia
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:16 PM
The mare was still caught in the wire, so yeah, I think the barbed wire was probably a contributing factor.
You will notice that I was not telling anybody what to do, just what I do and why.
I'm not trying to be snotty, just relaying my experience and opinion. Sorry if I didn't make that clear.

chai
Apr. 4, 2011, 03:40 PM
Zarafia, I'm with you. Horses can find trouble no matter how hard we try to keep them safe, and a barbed wire injury is a horrific thing. It's just a matter of trying to reduce the odds, and getting rid of the barbed wire would be my first choice. Smooth electric wire, high tensile wire, big windowpane wire...they're all bad types of fencing for horses because they cut through flesh so easily.

100 acres of barbed wire is a lot to remove, but if I had the choice, I would run a safe fenceline inside the barbed wire until I removed the barbed wire, section by section. Mr. Chai and I bought a property that had large wire windowpane fencing. I saw a horse get a leg caught in that type of fencing when I was a kid. An injury like that stays with you, so that fencing had to go. It was overgrown with dirt and weeds along the bottom, so Mr. Chai and I roped it to our old pickup and pulled it out, section by section.

Good luck with your project.

manentail
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:08 PM
That would be good scrap money. If you don't want to mess with it, let someone take it for free and scrap it. Just make them sign a liablity waiver.

HydroPHILE
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:48 PM
If your fences in GA are like the ones we had in AL many years ago, I can see why horses get hurt on them, they were very sorry, a few strands of all kinds of material here and there, loose wire, some smooth, some barbed, an accident waiting to happen.

You are absolutely correct. I have yet to see properly stretched barbed wire anywhere here in GA.

Opus1
Apr. 4, 2011, 05:22 PM
You are absolutely correct. I have yet to see properly stretched barbed wire anywhere here in GA.

That's because it hasn't been replaced in about 30 years. I spent a couple months helping my dad put up barbed wire fencing over 400+ acres. Divided up into 25 acre plots. Four strands barbed wire, one strand of hot wire on t-posts for a lady's cows. (So, at least one farm has proper barbed wire in Ga.)

When done right, they're really not that bad. I would definitely add some hot wire to it, and then replace it a little at a time, if you're still not comfortable with the idea. Tearing it all down and starting from scratch seems daunting and very expensive.

Bluey
Apr. 4, 2011, 06:39 PM
You are absolutely correct. I have yet to see properly stretched barbed wire anywhere here in GA.

Some of our fences are a good 150 years old, the wire lost all it's stretch long ago, is brittle and just keeps breaking.
Some of it almost looked like this when we finally took it all down and built new fences:

JanM
Apr. 4, 2011, 10:02 PM
If you decide you can't live with the wire, (and 100 acres plus cross fencing is a lot) then see what you options are by reusing the poles. That should save a bunch of money, but if you can't refence, and don't want the barb wire then you'll have to keep looking. I agree with manentail that you can get someone to take it for scrap, but make sure that there isn't old wire left around, or that they take all of it and don't drop pieces everywhere that will be a pain to get rid of.

columbus
Apr. 5, 2011, 07:02 PM
I would maintain the barbed wire so it stayed in like new shape. Never let it sag. Electrify the top so horses dont eat over the top and electrify using the extended insulators on the inside of every stretch that has horse on the inside and on both sides where ever there are horses on both sides. Occasionally you will find horses who still hang too close to the fence attracted by the other horses. At this point I would run a new hot fence inside that horses field to keep them away from the barbed wire.

Then I would have non-barb fencing where I would introduce new horses and young horses to the herd. That is the most risky time. Horses will run new horses through fences and you need an entirely barb free area to completely integrate new horses before they ever go out on the barb. Young horses play and forget and the best remedy is hot hot fences.

Watch how the horses use the fields. You may find some areas just are bad spots to have barb. They come galloping in as a herd and the boss mare likes to make them scatter as they get in close or in a corner...whatever...there you will need to remove the barb or refence inside the barb with electric.

Dont drylot with barb as the fence just gets more pressure. Don't train inside barb rings.

The worst accidents are with barb, it is dangerous, I have barbless and I have horses tangled in the fence several times a year usually because horses are teasing each other on both sides of the fence and one or another strikes and catches a wire...in my case they just pull down the wire and I fix the wire and fix the electric...again. In my case I have not mastered keeping the fence hot, for barbed that would be a lesson you need to learn fast. I find horses gallop along fences, for me they are so close they break the fancy Horseguard insulators. It is just horses being horses. Take care. Pato

coloredcowhorse
Apr. 5, 2011, 09:55 PM
So we are looking at property and MO seems like acres upon acres upon acres of barbed wire.

One of the places we like has approx 100 acres of BRAND new fenced and cross fenced barbed wire. Nice in the sense that we have metal posts, crappy in that who wants to take down all that fence and replace.

Those of you that purchased old cow property, what did you do? I was wondering if we offered the barbed wire free to anyone who came and took it down? Then I have visions of someone injuring themself, and the potential liability.

Thoughts?

You can put up someting like HorseGuard tape on 8 inch extenders (on the inside) of the fence to give the horses a reason to stay off the fence and a visual warning that it is there. Also consider hobble training any horse you put out there so that should he get stupid and hook a foot on a lower strand they don't fight it...will stand and wait for rescue.

HydroPHILE
Apr. 6, 2011, 10:21 AM
That's because it hasn't been replaced in about 30 years. I spent a couple months helping my dad put up barbed wire fencing over 400+ acres.

That's not necessarily true. The primary reason why the barbed wire isn't as stretched and fenced properly is due to lack of knowledge or laziness. They don't want to properly stretch the fence nor are they concerned about how it looks, how strong it is. I've seen brand-spankin' new fence put up that looks just as awful as "hasn't been replaced in 30 years" fencing.

NoDQhere
Apr. 6, 2011, 10:41 AM
You can put up someting like HorseGuard tape on 8 inch extenders (on the inside) of the fence to give the horses a reason to stay off the fence and a visual warning that it is there. Also consider hobble training any horse you put out there so that should he get stupid and hook a foot on a lower strand they don't fight it...will stand and wait for rescue.

Bolding mine. I think every horse should be hobble broke but so many folks think it is a horrible thing to do to a horse. All of our horses are hobble broke. I know of many instances where being hobble broke actually saved a horses life.

Having said that, hobble breaking needs to be done quietly and on very soft footing, just in case.

Bluey
Apr. 6, 2011, 10:49 AM
I wonder, how come people around here have been using barbwire around horses for 100+ years now and yes, there are injuries here and there, but hardly not more than with any other fencing a horse may hit and, since barbwire is a good 95% of the fencing here, really, there is comparatively few injuries from it?

There was not any barbed wire in the riding centers in the East I was in and still, horses were ocassionally injured in their wood fences and at a higher rate than I have seen in the West, where we have more horses in each ranch too.
Then, those horses were also generally not kept outside but part of the time and the pastures and paddocks were smaller.

It is not the breed, we raised quarter and TB horses together, in the same pastures, behind barbwire and we didn't have but 3 injuries in 40 years.:confused:
One addled brained yearling filly that was not quite right up stairs cut herself running thru the brush and maybe into the fence and had some long, superficial cuts on her neck and one hind leg and two foals with one light small cut each, in 40 years and at times we had up to 50 mares and some of their weanling/yearling/two year old offspring out in those pastures.

I think that yes, barbwire can and does cause bad injuries, but I wonder if any more than any other a horse may hit and, as our vet used to say, at least horses tend to respect barbwire fences more than other kinds, so they are less apt to try to go thru one.

Our neighbor has some stalls with 50'x20' pens with pipe and two years ago a yearling was found the next morning with a broken neck and the gate at the end of his run had a bent top pipe.:cry:

Never, not even with hot wire over it, I would have two horses across each other with any kind of single wire type fences, like four or five strand ones, between them, barb or not, because of how most horses are and think.
I have seen such setups and no injuries, but to me that is really dangerous, if horses were to play across those kinds of fences.
They may paw or kick at the other horse, miscalculate and get into the fence.
With woven wire, pipe or wood, the chance of injuries is much less than with single wires, I think.

I think that horses and any kind of fencing is an accident waiting to happen.
Is barbwire bad, terrible, unacceptable?
I would say, from many years of experience, that it depends on the fence, where it is and how you manage your horses behind that kind of fence, just as it would be with any other kind of fence.

Jumpin_Horses
Apr. 6, 2011, 11:21 AM
FYI -

I have not read all the other posts, but, I just wanted to share something that happened to me just this last weekend

Ive (my family) owned horses for about 40ish years. had only a couple of non-eventful "fence" injuries with my horses...

however, this last weekend, something spooked my TB mare in the night. and she bolted through a fence. It looked like she tried to stop, but, she must have been flying and it was so muddy that she slid and hit it hard

she has only a few minor scrapes on top layers of skin.

this could have been SO much worse, as she actually bent a T-post.

you see, even though ive never really had a "bad fence injury", ive always felt "safe fencing" ("safe" LOL, such as it is) was important. and yes I do have a ton of fenced acreage

I use electric tape, with a mixture of wood posts and and CAPPED T-posts. yes, it was VERY expensive to put up this fencing. it was put up correctly, and tightness check is done on a regular basis.

the fence did what was supposed to do. as much as it could, it protected my animal. yes, she got some scrapes, which is bad, but, she would have SURELY been impaled on an uncapped T, and/or sliced wide open on a thin (or barbed) wire.

it only took 1 time in many years of owning horse, for a fencing situation to arise, that could have been catastrophic.

this is just my personal experience - Just something to ponder over.......

IronwoodFarm
Apr. 6, 2011, 02:49 PM
As a kid, my horses were boarded where there was barbed wire. It wasn't a big deal. We marked it and lived with it. Our farm also had barbed wire on it as it was leased for cows previously. Removing barbed wire is real work especially if it old and the fence lines overgrown. It is not the kind of work people line up for just to get the scrap metal value. We just chisel away at removing it every year and have made good progress. Recently our neighbor asked if he could have the coiled wire we have for disposal for scrap metal and we were happy to give it to him. That's the extent of the help we have ever had with it.

MeghanDACVA
Apr. 6, 2011, 04:50 PM
Horses get hurt on ANY fence type. I woulnd't use barbed wire in a small paddock but if there is sufficent room so that the horses won't be running somebody into an area they can't get out of, I don't have problems with it.

We have had wood board fence. Broken boards are great for impaling horses. And if a board gets knocked off, there are those nails sticking up.

Hot wire of various fashions. They can still run thru it. If it is off (accidental) and they get thru it they can get tangled up in it and get pretty bad cuts from it. The woven stuff burns like hell when wrapped around a body part and pulled. If they don't ground well when they touch it, they don't get shocked.

Metal panels. Stick foot/leg/hoof thru and get stuck, panel comes loose, horse running in field with panel stuck on leg. Not pretty. Getting hung or cut on the connecting pins.

Weldied pipe. Run into it and it doesn't give. Can kick thru it and get leg hung.

Pipe fence with cable. If a leg gets thru it, it will tear it to pieces.

Hi Tensile (electric or not). Even if strung tight it can sag and horses can get tangled in it. Needs to have springs to asorb shock and springs need to be checked for correct tension regularily.

Fence posts in general. Impale horses

I guess the only "safe" fence for horses is no-climb wire with a solid something at the top that won't break and is close enough to the ground that a horse can't get a foot under. We had a horse in this sort of fence and he gashed a leg where the bottom of the wire was cut to fit. You know horses--he found it and put a hind leg right up to it and cut the daylights out it the leg.

When someone finds a truly horse safe fence, let me know?

Fancy That
Apr. 6, 2011, 06:58 PM
Most large ranches & pastures in CA (or anywhere out west) are done in barb wire.

When the barb-wire is tight and well-maintained, it really is fine for the large pastures out here. I've had horses boarded in huge barb-wire pastures my whole life.

When we bought our ranch nearly 2 years ago, it had some barb-wire fencing, so we just ran hot-rope on the top rail, with extenders. Horses never get hear the barb-wire.

I don't LOVE barb-wire, but I've never had any issues with it and it's quite common/normal out here.

If you have 100 acres, you're probably okay leaving it or running hot wire/rope if you want to be extra careful.

I can't imagine how you'd remove it :(

Nes
Apr. 6, 2011, 07:43 PM
We have the same problem but only bought about 4 acres of trouble :D.

I was discussing with a local feed store owners and they sell clips for electric that attach directly to the barbed wire.

However, on further reflection my horse is blonde as they come (both literally and figuratively) and even though she's been behind electric all her life, and never tests it - I'd sleep better when we're away knowing she's not going to get spooked into it & we're replacing with 6' field fence.

ReSomething
Apr. 6, 2011, 09:37 PM
You can take it down, it's just a royal PITA. If it is new enough it has memory and it will self coil so it's a good two person job, person one detaches it and person two stretches and rolls it up kind of following the way it wants to coil as you go. Good thick leather gloves are a must.

Old stuff, like my shared fenceline, I mght just cut into short chunks. I grew up with the stuff and it's pretty much the only affordable option for some big Western pastures. For a little acre or less paddock I'd be taking it down, especially if there is any slope for them to slip into it.

What I really want is miles of dry stone walls, we have about enough rocks for them.

Hampton Bay
Apr. 6, 2011, 10:18 PM
Hotwire, the actual wire, on standoff insulators. Get a GOOD solar charger, and run the ground through the barbed wire. That way if the barbed wire is touching the ground, it will give a good ground to shock. If not, you can use more grounding rods around the perimeter of your pasture to get a better ground on a bigger area.

I have BW in a smaller pasture, and the horses don't touch it for the most part. It's only on one side, and even before I got the hotwire working, they stayed off it. It's about 7 strands of wire though, and I've made sure to keep it secured well to the posts.

x
Apr. 7, 2011, 10:59 AM
I cleared the barbed wire from my land by just doing that; putting an ad that it was free for the taking, and I had two different people inquire and come and between the two they took it all.