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jay0087
Apr. 1, 2011, 08:26 PM
A few years ago my farrier and good friend purchased a yearling grey gelding. I just loved the way he looked and said when your done with him, racing and what not, I want him. Well over the next year or so he got huge. 17 hands and a tanks, nothing like a tb so I wanted him even more.

He went off to trainning and shortly after being there he got loose and ran between the fence and a horse bus. Whacked his hip really good. The vets were unable to get x-rays because it was so high up but from the looks of it they thought he broke his hip and said to consider putting him down. Owner decided that as long as his other legs held up he would give him a chance. Well he fully recovered.

Last summer I got the opportunity to help break him and work with him. He was so smart about everything and I just feel in love. The owner was going back and forth about selling him or taking him to the track. We showed him to a few people but nothing much. My horse ended up passing away in Nov and was hoping to get the chance to lease the grey (Danny)

Well that didn't work out and he went to the track. I now have a 6 months lease on another horse that ends in two months and not sure if its going to be renewed. Danny's owner calls me up today and says he is to big to hold up for racing, he is yours if you want him.

I Just graduated college last year and am working on getting my CPA so money is tight and my parents are not thrilled. I want this so bad. This is the only horse I have really fallen for other than my last horse. I dont know what to do.

HappyHorselover
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:09 PM
well you know what we're all going to say....


:yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes: BUY HIM!

Pixie0304
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:12 PM
Would the owner let you lease him until you can get the money together to buy him?
I mean, if the owner knows 100% sure you will buy, they would actually win in this situation..
If they called you, they know you really want him, maybe they can work something out for you?
or like a payment plan kind of thing? you would pay an amount every month until you pay him off?

FlashGordon
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:15 PM
Big TB gelding named Danny?! And he's your dream horse?

Buy him!

(ok well I might not be the voice of reason... because I went through a similarly long saga of lusting after a big TB named Dan... and I did buy him... and it was one of the best things I did!)

Laurierace
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:39 PM
I think when the timing is right the perfect horse will fall into your lap. While I am sure he is lovely horses like him are not exactly in short supply.

Kryswyn
Apr. 1, 2011, 11:11 PM
Make it happen. You'll always regret it if you pass him by. If I've learned anything in my 52 years, it is go with your gut. Others may approve or disapprove of anything you do, but at the end of the day, YOU are the one who has to live with the decision.

TrakeGirl
Apr. 2, 2011, 06:58 AM
Just a question about soundness - when the current race track owner said he was too big to hold up to racing...has he been lame? Something you might want to ask/consider.

Also, my horse fractured his hip in a fall when he was 4. He also "recovered" completely, but be aware that you are going to be faced with joint maintenance issues probably a little earlier than most folks (for my horse, it is both SI area and stifle...stifle gets jacked up from dealing with compensating for that hip). Not saying you shouldn't buy him for that reason - just go into it with eyes open that you are going to need to budget for joint maintenance down the road.

cloudyandcallie
Apr. 2, 2011, 07:05 AM
Don't ever pass up something that you really want.

shalomypony
Apr. 2, 2011, 07:39 AM
Just do it,it will all work out.You must always learn to trust your gut!:)

Christa P
Apr. 2, 2011, 08:04 AM
Is there a cheap pasture board place you can keep him for 2 months. Let the owners of the lease horse know YOU won't be renewing the lease and why so they can look for a new person. In 2 months you would be back to 1 horse and he will have had 2 months of let down time.


Christa

Squirt
Apr. 2, 2011, 08:35 AM
Is there a cheap pasture board place you can keep him for 2 months. Let the owners of the lease horse know YOU won't be renewing the lease and why so they can look for a new person. In 2 months you would be back to 1 horse and he will have had 2 months of let down time.


Christa

This!

jay0087
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:07 AM
He would be giving him to me so I would not have to come up with money to purchase him just money to keep him. He same up with a suspensory injury last week that is why he is done with him. I dont know alot about this type of injury other than I know a few horses that have had it in the past. I would need to look into it more and have my vet look at his x-rays.

I would do a pre-purchase exam on him and if they told me he could not do what I wanted I would have to pass him up. The last horse I had the vet told us that he had arthritis in his hocks so she didn't suggust doing much 3 foot with him. That wasn't a big deal when I was 10 but it became a problem and even though the vet later said he could do it, my mom was set on No he is not.

There is just something about this horse that I love. I didn't do a whole lot with him since he was basicly being broke to race but I did do a little jumping and some lead chages. I think if I would have continued with him, he would be cruising over 2'6 course.

I have add some links to his pictures and a couple videos. I know my Equ. is all over the place. Pulled the tall boots out after a long time of being in the closet. I wanted some nice pictures so I through them on. And it was a day in the 70s and I was in a long sleeve shirt lol.

http://s35.photobucket.com/albums/d178/jay0087/Danny/

Danny trotting less than a month of being broke
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxkrnVGjGrA
Cantering
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_BKlq2WriA
Cantering a fence
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=navkkVg-Tvc

alibi_18
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:27 AM
So the horse is lame.

Suspensory injuries can take 3-6 months up to a year to be completely healed.
And this also mean stall confinement... and short in-hand walking. and vet x-ray or echo occassionnaly to check the progression.

So even if you don't have to pay money to 'buy' the horse, you'll have to pay good money for stall, vet treatment/visits, and not be able to ride or do anything with that horse for a long period.

(Don't you think the owner would prefer not to have to deal with such problem...horses aren't free for no reason...)Sorry.

If you really want to go thru a PPE, which will be difficult to do because the horse is lame from the suspensory injury so might hide another lameness and prevent from seeing any other locomotion troubles that wouldn't be related to this known injury.

Try first asking for the x-rays or the owner's vet record first and hand this to your vet for further examination. Then ask him is advice.

Good luck!

jay0087
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:48 AM
So the horse is lame.

Suspensory injuries can take 3-6 months up to a year to be completely healed.
And this also mean stall confinement... and short in-hand walking. and vet x-ray or echo occassionnaly to check the progression.

So even if you don't have to pay money to 'buy' the horse, you'll have to pay good money for stall, vet treatment/visits, and not be able to ride or do anything with that horse for a long period.

(Don't you think the owner would prefer not to have to deal with such problem...horses aren't free for no reason...)Sorry.

If you really want to go thru a PPE, which will be difficult to do because the horse is lame from the suspensory injury so might hide another lameness and prevent from seeing any other locomotion troubles that wouldn't be related to this known injury.

Try first asking for the x-rays or the owner's vet record first and hand this to your vet for further examination. Then ask him is advice.

Good luck!

Thanks! I am going to ask if he will keep him at his place for a couple months, if I pay the feed and hay and do all 6 of his stalls during the week. That way I can take my time to decide and see if this is something I can even do. Or see how he is holding up after 2 months rest. I know he wants him gone but I would also hope he knows how much I love the horse and how much I have helped him in the past.

If he can't do that and I can't figure something out I feel comfortable with, I will have to let him go. I can't make this decision over the weekend

mortebella
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:49 AM
the horse isn't sound to race. That's a long way from not being sound enough to carry somebody around 2'6" - and a young busy professional starting a career, I gotta guess, the horse won't be ridden into the ground. LOL. Not for one minute disputing the advice to ask for all vet records and to get all the input from your vet you can before making your final decision...but, look at EVERYTHING, including how much riding you are realisticly going to be doing, AND the fact that this horse's temperment seems to be pretty suitable. In the canter fence video, I saw what must be a pretty green race horse take a fairly rusty rider over that crossrail with a demeanor that would do a steady eddy lesson horse credit. Stats wise, there are probably 100's just like him around, but brain-wise? mmmmmmmm, not so sure about that. There's a current thread on suspensory injuries on the eventing board, you might want to look at that, too.

mortebella
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:58 AM
I'm a re-rider (who took 29 years off :eek:) and bought my horse in grad school. I didn't know when I bought him if I would even find a job in my field soon enough after graduation to be able to keep him - I thought I might be forced to sell him, if I had to relocate to a very high cost of living area, etc, etc. Nonetheless, I decided to take it a year at a time, and enjoy him while I could have him. Best decision I ever made for myself. He was older than I really wanted, so I knew eventually I would deal with maintenance issues that, again, I wasn't sure if I could afford.

I can't imagine life without him. :D Even if he becomes a pasture puff tomorrow, and I have to find some other way to keep riding, if you lose your heart to one, the relationship is about more than riding, and they will always have things to teach you about horses and horsemanship - and yourself. Just my $.02.

Bogie
Apr. 2, 2011, 10:04 AM
You really need a vet's perspective on the suspensory injury to make an educated decision. Some horses recover with no issues, others do not.

My OTTB came off the track with an apical sesamoid fracture and a "tweak" to his suspensory on his FL but both injuries were minor. He was rehabbed by his racing owners and then retired. I've foxhunted him the past three seasons without any issues.

I restarted him very slowly to see if there would be any problems on that leg but I think his owners did a very good job during his recovery.

jay0087
Apr. 2, 2011, 10:14 AM
He is a very sweet horse. The only thing he has ever really done is through a few little bucks and put on the parking brake and not want to go forward. I did not jump him very much so he is really green. I am not the prettiest of riders and must admit that was a very bad day of riding for me. Not normally that bad and usually stronger. Although I am now having to work on sitting back, after not having to ride a challenging horse in a long time. My old guy was a good ride so I would just kinda jump and ride and not really work on anything. Plus not riding alot while in college has not helped. The horse I am leasing is really making me work for my ride.

kelsey97
Apr. 2, 2011, 10:14 AM
Alrighty, time for some tough love. Free horses are not FREE. Danny is handsome, but likely has soundness issues that will cost you a fortune, tons of disappointment, and he will probably end up as a pasture ornament. This type of horse is a dime a dozen, I promise you will find another Danny.
Focus on your career, continue leasing horses until you are financially ready to commit to a young horse to bring along.

tallygirl
Apr. 2, 2011, 11:21 AM
Alrighty, time for some tough love. Free horses are not FREE. Danny is handsome, but likely has soundness issues that will cost you a fortune, tons of disappointment, and he will probably end up as a pasture ornament. This type of horse is a dime a dozen, I promise you will find another Danny.
Focus on your career, continue leasing horses until you are financially ready to commit to a young horse to bring along.

Wow. Because he has a suspensory injury he is automatically going to be a pasture ornament?

Weird, my horse raced as a 3 year old, pulled his suspensory and was off for a year and never raced again. Hes 15 now next week, never been off a day in his life. In fact he just put his foot through a fence 6 weeks ago. tons and tons of stitches later and 6 weeks stall rest/hand walking (eventually) he never took ONE off step and just went back to work this week. This was the first time hes ever done something like that. He has been the horse of a lifetime and really has had no issues, knock on wood. This horse also cribs and when its feed time he sways a little bit.

I dont think Danny will be a pasture ornament, give him a chance, you never know what may happen. He's a very cute boy!

turningpointequine
Apr. 2, 2011, 11:22 AM
What a cute boy, and LOVE his mind! Looks like with some training he's going to be a steady eddie packer type.

Bummer he just injured his suspensory and hasn't already been rehabbed. :( Or that could be a good thing because you can rehab him and know it's done right? My boy injured his suspensory while on the track (took a year off from racing due to it), was rehabbed, raced again and is now my 3' horse. Not sure how much higher he'll go but that is not due to his limitations, it's due to mine. I wouldn't trade this horse for the world. He's safe and takes care of me yet just spunky enough to make the ride fun. It's easy to say horses are a dime a dozen, but I think you need to listen when you find a great mind that you just click with. It's not easy to always find that bond.

If you truly love him I say have a vet take a peak at him and see just how bad the suspensory is and go from there.

dodedo
Apr. 2, 2011, 11:37 AM
What a cute boy, and LOVE his mind! Looks like with some training he's going to be a steady eddie packer type.

Bummer he just injured his suspensory and hasn't already been rehabbed. :( Or that could be a good thing because you can rehab him and know it's done right? My boy injured his suspensory while on the track (took a year off from racing due to it), was rehabbed, raced again and is now my 3' horse. Not sure how much higher he'll go but that is not due to his limitations, it's due to mine. I wouldn't trade this horse for the world. He's safe and takes care of me yet just spunky enough to make the ride fun. It's easy to say horses are a dime a dozen, but I think you need to listen when you find a great mind that you just click with. It's not easy to always find that bond.

If you truly love him I say have a vet take a peak at him and see just how bad the suspensory is and go from there.

Ditto this!!!!!!!!

jay0087
Apr. 2, 2011, 11:50 AM
The more and more I think about it and the more I try to find ways to make it work, I feel I need to rip the band aid off and just say no. A friend of mine even offerd me a place to keep him for free. I can not guarentee I will have the money after I stop working the horse shows. I dont know when I will be finished with the CPA exams and have a job. And my dad is 65 and doesn't know how much longer he will be working and does not want the stress.

The horse I am leasing is green but with major potiental and who knows maybe I will end up with him. If I can work on my riding with him, i believe he will take me far.

I hope who ever he ends up going to will love him just as much as I do and treat him right

jen-s
Apr. 2, 2011, 12:13 PM
It's easy to say horses are a dime a dozen, but I think you need to listen when you find a great mind that you just click with. It's not easy to always find that bond.

If you truly love him I say have a vet take a peak at him and see just how bad the suspensory is and go from there.

This. Seriously. I let 2 heart horses slip through my hands and I've regretted it ever since. I vote that you spend $ and get a GOOD vet's opinion. If the outcome options are so-so or $$$, then your decision is at least informed and you'll have some comfort in the days/months/years ahead that you made the right move. If the projected outcome is good and manageable, then you go from there (and harass your FB friends and COTH pals to help you brainstorm how to make this work.

I'm lucky enough that I found another heart horse and he'll be with me until he crosses the bridge--either for pasture puffery or competitive genius--and every day he makes my life better and more meaningful and he's not only my cookie monster, but my therapist, best friend, and sanity all in one. I waited 20 years to find my horsey soulmate and I (obviously) strongly feel that when you find them (and from your pictures, you found him!), you just don't let them go.

CatOnLap
Apr. 2, 2011, 12:30 PM
... I just loved the way he looked and said when your done with him, racing and what not, I want him. .. 17 hands and a tanks, nothing like a tb so I wanted him even more.

... Whacked his hip really good. The vets were unable to get x-rays because it was so high up but from the looks of it they thought he broke his hip and said to consider putting him down. ..
...I just feel in love... Danny's owner calls me up today and says he is toO big to hold up for racing, he is yours if you want him.

I Just graduated college ... so money is tight and my parents are not thrilled. I want this so bad. .. I dont know what to do... He same up with a suspensory injury last week that is why he is done with him... I think if I would have continued with him, he would be cruising over 2'6 course.



Listen to your Guru Binder Dundat, dear Jay.

He's a big horse who has had two major injuries that were thought to be career ending. Really big horses are more expense, trouble, and they have worse prognoses in any injury situation. No vet PPE includes a crystal ball, but no vet would argue with my opinion. No matter how much he is able to recover, those injuries WILL come back to haunt him at some point. The fact that you are even thinking at this point that he will be a sound 2'6" horse (but I suspect what you really want and need is a sound 3'6" horse!) shows that you are really more interested in the competition and jumping aspect of horse sport than the companion, pasture pet angle.
And the bottom line is money is tight.

You can choose your regrets:
- regretting the big pasture pal you have to maintain for another 20 years while longing to compete and ride.
-regretting having to pass up a horse you are currently in love with in favour of recognizing where your passions really lie and buy a more suitable mount when you have more money.

You can choose to use your college educated brain and balance the probabilities, ignore your feelings, do not succumb to guilt especially, pass this horse up, and make life easier, likely for everyone concerned.

Koniucha
Apr. 2, 2011, 12:30 PM
Another vote to go for it! If you really feel he is the one, do what you can to get him. I am in a very similar situation with a thoroughbred mare. She is the horse I have dreamt about for twenty years!

Long Spot
Apr. 2, 2011, 12:41 PM
Listen to your Guru Binder Dundat, dear Jay.

He's a big horse who has had two major injuries that were thought to be career ending. Really big horses are more expense, trouble, and they have worse prognoses in any injury situation. No vet PPE includes a crystal ball, but no vet would argue with my opinion. No matter how much he is able to recover, those injuries WILL come back to haunt him at some point. The fact that you are even thinking at this point that he will be a sound 2'6" horse (but I suspect what you really want and need is a sound 3'6" horse!) shows that you are really more interested in the competition and jumping aspect of horse sport than the companion, pasture pet angle.
And the bottom line is money is tight.

You can choose your regrets:
- regretting the big pasture pal you have to maintain for another 20 years while longing to compete and ride.
-regretting having to pass up a horse you are currently in love with in favour of recognizing where your passions really lie and buy a more suitable mount when you have more money.

You can choose to use your college educated brain and balance the probabilities, ignore your feelings, do not succumb to guilt especially, pass this horse up, and make life easier, likely for everyone concerned.

The voice of reason!

Read this a few times.

ktm2007
Apr. 2, 2011, 12:45 PM
Wow. Because he has a suspensory injury he is automatically going to be a pasture ornament?

Weird, my horse raced as a 3 year old, pulled his suspensory and was off for a year and never raced again. Hes 15 now next week, never been off a day in his life. In fact he just put his foot through a fence 6 weeks ago. tons and tons of stitches later and 6 weeks stall rest/hand walking (eventually) he never took ONE off step and just went back to work this week. This was the first time hes ever done something like that. He has been the horse of a lifetime and really has had no issues, knock on wood. This horse also cribs and when its feed time he sways a little bit.

I dont think Danny will be a pasture ornament, give him a chance, you never know what may happen. He's a very cute boy!

Thats great that it worked out for you, but that is not always the case. I think what kelsey97 was pointing out was that there is a good chance that Danny may not turn into what OP hoped for. It's a valid point that needs to seriously be considered.

usedtobeaweffer
Apr. 2, 2011, 01:14 PM
JAY---- NO NO NO get him…. You can always find a way… there are always jobs… suspensory's do suck but they usually heal pretty damn well with the proper care (in my experience). We got a horse off the track when he was 2 1/2 with a broken sesmoid and a suspensory injury… he was THE BEST horse of our lives. He went on to win at WEF in the first years and be in the top 5 in the nation for first year greens way back when… he was NEVER lame… sore with an abcess yes, but never did those injuries bother him. Danny looks gorgeous from the pictures and you look so nice on him. Sometimes we make sacrifices for the things we want in life… I have always made sacrifices for the horses in my life ---which will probably mean that I will never have a house on the water or a fancy car… lol…

Pixie0304
Apr. 2, 2011, 02:35 PM
this is really getting divided in two opinions, getting him or not getting him.
You can weight the pros and cons and see what fits you best.
from my understanding, the money is tight for you like for many people. and you really love him.... so really tough decision.
If I were in your shoes, I would probably pass on the opportunity. just because the money is tight for me too, so I know, and I would rather the horse of my dreams be able to find a home that will care properly for him, and make sure he is well treated for his injuries.

+ side:
you fell in love
he is tall and pretty
his personality is great
he might have good potential

- side:
he had TWO major injuries
you might need to spend more on his vet bill than anything else
you are not done with your "career" path
you dont have a steady paid job right now


now, what would be more likely to suit you?
I know he probably is the horse of your dream, but can you afford to pay for every single vet bill that will come up?
like someone else said, is jumping 2'6 enough or you want to go further?
or can you afford to get him for now, and later on, get another one that can take you to a higher level of jumping?

i am not saying he will be with the vet every single day and suck up your money, I know someone mentioned they had a horse with same issues and came along great, but what are the chances it will be the same for you?
every horse is different, one coming out nicely of these types of injuries, does not mean they ALL will come out of it nicely. but there is a possibility this one will, no way to know right now, as most of the other person said, he might need a year off, and then you'll be able to see what he can do.
can you afford him for one year thinking you won't be able to ride him at all?

jay0087
Apr. 2, 2011, 04:05 PM
I talked to the owners gf/ wife (they have been together like 30 years) and we are going to see if he would go for keeping him for three months or more and I would come over and do the stalls. That way I can have more time to think about it and see how he is healing. I also have a friend that offered me free board at her house. So If I could get through the summer with the owners, then I might be able to move him to the other place. I should know in the next few days if he is willing to do this.

If the owner says no, than it will be a no from me.

No I do not want another 2'6 horse. I would like to do the 3 ft adults. I dont know if they could x-ray that hip or not to see if there is anything still going on there. No one really knows the extent of that injury. I dont know alot about his new injury, all he really said was that it was not as bad as his other horse that just had the same injury. And that horse is coming back sound after a few months.

Bogie
Apr. 2, 2011, 05:47 PM
It sounds like a good plan.

I hope he works out but at least now you've given yourself some time and can have his current and old injuries evaluated.

Good luck!

FineAlready
Apr. 2, 2011, 06:19 PM
Well, if you can get three months of stall rest under your belt before deciding on him that would be useful.

You two are cute together and you do seem to have a bond. I'd say that if you get him, you should go into it with the understanding that he will probably be a horse that you will need to take a "he will be what he will be" approach with.

I got my horse as a three and a half year old off the track. He pulled a suspensory with me just after he turned four. It was an agonizing YEAR of stall rest/rehab before he was finally back in full work. It was a tough year. Really tough. He was not the best patient. But I bonded with that horse like no other because of that long rehab. He's my bestest buddy now, and we are getting ready to show in the baby greens this year. The day he pulled his suspensory, I gave up on having specific goals for him. I find it is easier that way. It is better for me and for him to let him tell me what he is capable of doing, rather than trying to force him into being what I want him to be.

If you think you can approach this horse this way, then I say you should get him. You may find out that he will exceed even your highest expectations, or he may fall short. I think this is true of any horse, though, really. Frankly, I have zero regrets about owning my horse despite his injury and despite the fact that I have modified some of my goals. He's the best horse ever, and my equine soul mate.

One thing to keep in mind is that if he pulled a front suspensory, it is very likely that it is due to compensating for a hind end problem (perhaps the injured hip). If you can fix the hind end, you may be able to better protect the front end in the future. Just something to keep in mind.

Acertainsmile
Apr. 2, 2011, 06:28 PM
Make sure you get an Ultrasound of that suspensory, not an xray. Since he is "free", spend your money on a very good PPE and decide from there.

Roxy SM
Apr. 2, 2011, 07:30 PM
One thing to keep in mind is that if he pulled a front suspensory, it is very likely that it is due to compensating for a hind end problem (perhaps the injured hip). If you can fix the hind end, you may be able to better protect the front end in the future. Just something to keep in mind.

Great point. Also wanted to add that 2 of my junior jumpers had front suspensories and never fully recovered. One had surgery and a year off. Then we slowly brought him back to work and as soon as we jumped him over some teeny stuff once he went lame again. The other one didn't have surgery, but she came back sound and stayed sound over the winter of flatting and light jumping and as soon as spring came and we were getting ready to show she went lame again. This happened twice, then we bred her twice so she had 2.5 years off. When we tried to bring her back into work to sell as a low-level jumper she went lame again as soon as we jumped some little jumps. Both horses had great vets, farriers, and trainers. Both had also passed the vet with flying colors when I'd bought them. So there is no guarantee that he will recover fully.

baldfaceboyz
Apr. 2, 2011, 08:13 PM
No one needs a serious buck issue. You showed me the video of him bucking you off recently and he is too big and too good at it to fool with IMO. If your vet thinks this guy could make a physical comeback, I'd say worth the wait and better than what you have now. Grey horse is a real cutie !

danceronice
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:23 PM
I'd be more worried about the hip than the suspensory at this point. In general, though, I agree with FineAlready--if after three months you feel like you can take a chance on him, understanding that he may not be a 3' (if the hip is truly bad, he might not be much of anything) horse, then go for it, but think really hard about that.

Yeah, horses have recovered fine from suspensory injuries on the track and gone on to good second jobs. But this is on top of a hip injury where you say they aren't sure exactly what it is? That makes it a less clear-cut picture. Especially if you aren't sure that you're ready financially to either handle every vet bill that comes along, and if you don't have a real plan if he turns out to not be the horse you hoped for--there isn't a market for a horse with a bad hip.

jay0087
Apr. 3, 2011, 07:55 PM
No one needs a serious buck issue. You showed me the video of him bucking you off recently and he is too big and too good at it to fool with IMO. If your vet thinks this guy could make a physical comeback, I'd say worth the wait and better than what you have now. Grey horse is a real cutie !

lol I am curious who this is? Yeah he is a big butt!! I learned alittle more about his past today and realized other than when he was broke, he has only been consistently ridden for 5 months. He is coming along and teaching me to sit my ass up and not ride him like a pleasure horse.

pinkme
Apr. 3, 2011, 09:25 PM
jay ( i know you in real life btw). I think you should go for it. Danny makes you happy. You have a cheap place to keep him you said in a previous post, worst comes to worst, you have a handsome pet that you know will have a great home.

baldfaceboyz
Apr. 3, 2011, 10:48 PM
I'm all for what a horse can teach you, it just shouldn't kill or maim you in the process. Correct ID, pls keep to yourself. Good luck making the right decision !

Giddy-up
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:18 PM
I have rehabbed a horse with a hind suspensory injury. Prior to injury he was my 3'6" adult jumper. He did make a successful come back, but given his age (he was 14 when it happened) he only was a 3' horse after that.

We followed the vets recommendations for rehab to a T & did everything they said. Add up the ultrasounds & shockwave treatments (every 4-6 weeks) at the clinic (factor in shipping if you don't have your own trailer), the mini-pulse machine we purchased, the hand walking 2-3x per day for 4 months, paying board for 4 months of stall rest, then bringing him home for another 10 months of turn out (cheaper than the boarding barn) just all to "see" if it worked.

ETA--just wanted to add our time line. Horse injured early Jan, stall rested hand walked until May 1st, turned out until Sept when we did a little riding just to see what we had (it was good), and then turned back out again until February when we re-started him. Back showing again early May.

I think one time we said it was a very rough cost of $6-7,000. And this is a somewhat "cheap" number cause we have our own trailer, my parents didn't charge me board when the horse was at home & we did all the rehab work ourselves (didn't pay the barn for it).

Luckily in our case it did work out. But this was for a horse I already had owned & been succesfully showing for almost 8 years so we knew what we had. I know others on here are going to offer their opions on how to rehab a suspensory, but I can only share what we did. :)

Personally I would not be taking on a horse that has 2 injuries you already know about while you are still trying to finish school & merge in to the next phase of your life. Your "free" horse could easily cost you $10K. I suppose if you are really willing to take the chance & spend the money, but I think there are too many other horses out there that aren't starting off with so much working against them.

Candle
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:13 PM
I thought something looked a little off in the trot video of him at first, his hind end looks funny to me. It's just my opinion, I'm not a vet, but I think you can find other horses who maybe move a little bit freer in the hind end and still make your heart happy. I do understand why you want him, however, he's a LOVELY horse. Good luck with the decision.