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Eventing_Rocks
Mar. 31, 2011, 10:56 PM
What does everyone do for post xc care for there horse?

Think for a Training/Prelim horse.

Thanks!

*Trinity*
Mar. 31, 2011, 11:31 PM
There was a thread recently about this with great tips! Although you may get replies here, do a search for it.

Eventing Strong
Mar. 31, 2011, 11:50 PM
I'd like to know what people do, too. It seems like with the other threads, most people answer for more of an ULH instead of a Training horse (like I have). I'd love to know what's done with horses that *too* fit.

faybe
Apr. 1, 2011, 12:11 AM
Always- lots of walking for cool down. Sponge/hose if it's warm enough. I like liniment baths so once they're cool they get that. If it's too cool for a bath I'll do a milder liniment gel on their legs. If the ground was really hard or the horse is in a lot of work (like a horse that's running prelim but in work to move up) I'll ice or pack their feet (esp the weeny, thin soled TBs). If horse is staying in that night, I wrap; if it's a short trailer ride home to turn out, I might not wrap. I don't generally poultice. And I always give lots of pats and carrots. :)

All of the above (minus the carrots) is my baseline and varies by horse- I think it really depends on (among other things) their age, their physical condition, what their future work looks like, and how they feel coming off course.

Eventing Strong
Apr. 1, 2011, 02:07 AM
May I ask why you don't poultice? I know some riders that always do it even for some novice horses and I know some that don't. I've only done it once because I found some heat (would've been considered normal heat for most horses but I know my horse has particularly ice cold legs) in a front leg after a long course on harder ground.

Mukluk
Apr. 1, 2011, 02:07 PM
I recuperate by having a few beers.... oh the horse.... she has a few too! :D

Eventing_Rocks
Apr. 1, 2011, 08:07 PM
For those that do ice your horse do you put poultice on the legs after too?

technopony
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:36 PM
Currently: For my retired UL horse who takes me around at training, I ice, poultice and wrap if the ground was hard or if I'm stabling overnight. If we are going right home, I don't wrap or poultice because he will just go outside, but ever since I invested in ice boots I always ice - it can't hurt! (If done properly of course). I also pack hooves with Magic Cushion.

For my 11 year old who is going novice, I only ice if the ground was really hard. If stabling overnight, I still wrap and poultice, but again, if the event is local the horse will just be turned out when we get home so I don't bother.

For any horse, I always apply gel liniment to the legs and do a vetrolin bath if it is warm enough.

Eventing_Rocks
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:43 PM
but ever since I invested in ice boots I always ice - it can't hurt!

Thanks!

What kind of ice boots do you use?

eventr4life
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:51 PM
ICE ICE ICE! then poultice, and wrap all fours!
Always remember to inspect the legs after you get off and after you take the wraps off to notice any new heat, or swelling.

Lori T
Apr. 1, 2011, 09:56 PM
When my daughter was competing her mare (who had a lot of upper level milage and so we really wanted to take care of her!), we hosed and then poulticed. When we got home, she was turned out minimum 12 hours. She HATED being iced, so we could never do that! She got a linament body wash as well.
With Tucker, my BN, he gets hosing (we seem to do more xc schooling than actual competing right now) and then linament followed by turnout.
If for some reason turnout is not an option due to weather, then legs are wrapped.

Mtn trails
Apr. 1, 2011, 10:21 PM
This is for a lower level novice horse. Hose legs after removing boots and if there's no heat but being stabled overnight, no wrapping but checking on and off to make sure legs are in good shape. Also, a hose off if it's hot; otherwise I set a bucket out in the morning to get rid of the chill and sponge neck, chest, and between hind legs.

technopony
Apr. 2, 2011, 01:39 AM
Thanks!

What kind of ice boots do you use?

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-04584&ids=884635777

faybe
Apr. 2, 2011, 07:31 AM
May I ask why you don't poultice? I know some riders that always do it even for some novice horses and I know some that don't. I've only done it once because I found some heat (would've been considered normal heat for most horses but I know my horse has particularly ice cold legs) in a front leg after a long course on harder ground.

When I first started eventing, poulticing was "the norm" (at least in my area) and my trainer had us poultice everyone, at every level. 15 years later, I've become a little more discretionary. I've seen a number of legs blow up after poulticing, either because there was a small cut under the hair that I didn't catch or simply because they were of the "thin-skinned, hyper-sensitive" variety for whom the poultice was too much of a skin irritant. I'll still use poultice as a hoof pack (though lately I've switch to that Magic Cushion stuff- love it) or if the horse has some swelling or heat that warrants it, but I've found icing, liniment and wrapping to be a better alternative for standard after-xc care.

technopony, I use the same ice boots. They great, especially when you need to get them off quickly- the buckles at the bottom come in handy.

Eventing_Rocks
Apr. 2, 2011, 07:51 AM
How long do you use the jack's ice boots for?

faybe
Apr. 2, 2011, 07:56 AM
How long do you use the jack's ice boots for?

For healthy, average age novice and training horses, I usually don't ice. For prelim and up, 20-30 minutes, depending on how they feel (and how long they feel like tolerating the boots :winkgrin:).

Eventing_Rocks
Apr. 2, 2011, 08:13 AM
Thanks!!!

Sorry for the many questions!

Last one :) Can you use these boots to ice the hind legs?

clk
Apr. 2, 2011, 09:18 AM
I guess I don't really understand the rationale of wrapping and poultice.

If it is to prevent swelling and reduce heat in tissues which may have traumatic injury, why is it not nessecary to wrap or do anything at the lower levels if you are turning the horse out?

Is wrapping to reduce the response to pounding, or to prevent stocking up from being in a stall?

If there has been sufficient damage to produce a response (heat swelling) how does wrapping or poltice really treat the cause (i.e. the injury)? I've also always been kind confused why we take NSAIDS to reduce a fever when that is the body's response to an infection, and just treating the symptoms may in fact be hindering the body's abilty to fight the infection.

Or I may yet again, be overthinking this.

Auto Be A Storm
Apr. 2, 2011, 04:14 PM
a good cool out by walking around. a good linamint rub down with cool water, lots of grazing while drying. poltice legs, wrap with pillow wraps and bandages give a couple carrots and head home!

ACMEeventing
Apr. 2, 2011, 08:01 PM
I recuperate by having a few beers.... oh the horse.... she has a few too! :D

Plus 1.

Snaffle81
Apr. 3, 2011, 01:12 PM
Sorry for the hijack, but for those of you that pack your horse's feet... is that pack and wrap all four - like you wrap for an abscess? What about icing their hooves, what boot do you use? How do you like Ice Horse's boot (http://www.bitofbritain.com/Ice_Horse_Big_Black_Boot_p/0724.htm)? It seems pricy for all four, but it would be worth it for prevention. Just curious, I'm a visual person and I'm trying to picture it. Thanks! :)

piaffeprincess98
Apr. 3, 2011, 09:16 PM
For my training level OTTB, I take studs out and untack, then bath if needed. Then I ice for about 20 minutes. If the ground was hard, I poultice, otherwise I use liniment and wrap. We always have at least an hours drive home, so I want him wrapped. By the time I get back to the trailer, he's usually cooled off, dry, ready for a drink and a pee and quite proud of himself! It's crazy how fast he recovers. He could go around again if I let him.

I generally have whoever's with me hand graze him while I get a drink and sit down for a second, especially if it's hot.

Since he was a racehorse, he really knows when to get hyped up and when it's done.