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1ofEach
Mar. 29, 2011, 08:50 AM
At 7:15am this morning, I look out my kitchen window to see my dog with his hair standing straight up and in a very aggressive posture in one of our fields, 10 ft off the driveway. 10 ft away from to his right is a coyote. 50 ft from him to his left are 2 more coyotes. I ran to the door and called him. Luckily he's extremely obedient and came instead of chasing the coyotes as they ran off. If I thought I had a few more seconds, I would have grabbed a gun. My dog is my family, so his safety came first. This all happened within 100 ft of my running car with the radio on.

It may be a week or two before some hunters are able to come out. My husband is going to buy a live trap today. I'd happily get a leg trap, but there are too many stray dogs and cats around here that we don't want to hurt. I don't have high hopes for it, but these suckers must be very hungry and are very bold.

What should I bait the trap with?

JCS
Mar. 29, 2011, 08:54 AM
Oh my... please don't trap your coyotes. They are not evil.

deckchick
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:11 AM
While it is debatable whether or not they are evil, I echo the request not to trap the coyotes. I am surrounded by coyotes, I literally have 1/2 dozen dens within a mile of my farm. I see and hear them all the time.

Coyotes are very smart about drawing your dogs out, 1 will call, if your dog chases them, they will run into a pack that will kill it. The key is to strike a balance. My alpha dog, Charlie, patrols the grounds nightly, he has marked his territory, and he will fight and kill any coyote that comes within his boundaries.

My other animals know when Charlie barks, heads up! something is going on.

Please though, forget the traps. My neighbour was walking her 2 border collies on the rural road last summer. Some moron put two traps in the ditch, killed both her dogs.

Poison will work, but then you risk any and all of your animals, and neighbours animals getting into it. Best to keep your gun handy and shoot the coyotes if they come up close to your house.

JSwan
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:20 AM
My neighbor recently had his coonhound killed by coyotes. A working, fit coonhound. Heard the dog screaming but couldn't get to him in time to save him.

I'm pretty darn predator friendly, and don't mind them at all. But when one or more poses a threat to pets or livestock, my choice is clear. My duty is to protect my animals.

You can purchase a humane trap, bait it with meat, venison is good, and wait. A humane trap won't kill any animal. It will just trap the animal, and you can release a non target species. That is what I do. I will not permit any poison or lethal trapping on my land.

But coyotes usually don't stop preying just because one has been killed. And they respond to predation differently than a prey animal like deer. If you are dealing with a hybrid, or coyotes who have packed up, they will be back. You will not be able to kill them all, nor is that a good idea.

Trapping will work to eliminate one problem coyote, but not a pack.

Sorry.

Bobuddy
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:23 AM
Agree with above posters.

If you trap/kill/remove a coyote, another one will take its place. That will not get rid of your problem.

Bluey
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:45 AM
Get the cheapest meat you can find, hamburget meat is good for that and make small balls for bait.

If you have too many and brave coyotes, you need to thin them and make them more wary, so they stay away.
For us shooting at them is a good way, don't need to kill them, just scare them, so they stay away from the house and barns, out in the pastures, where they belong.

If you take out too many coyotes, trapping or poisoning or shooting them, you alter their territories and other coyotes will move in, that, again, not knowing the territory, will try your house, barns and animals, until you again either discourage them, or trap/poison/shoot and the cycle repeats.

So, better a few known coyotes, that will stay away, than playing musical chairs with continuous, clueless new coyotes coming in on the empty territory you have provided for them.

deckchick
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:16 AM
JSwan, sorry about your neighbours dog. That's what I was talking about when I said if they can draw your dog out, the pack will kill it.

I 100% agree you must protect your livestock, but yeah, kill one or two and it will really make no difference. What you need to do is make it so your livestock are not easy prey.

You need to train your dog to bark but not chase, and keep your gun handy for any that do dare venture close.

Bluey, you got that right! The coyotes packs around here are very established and smart, they seem to have learned that my dogs won't chase them, so they tend to travel on the far fence lines away from my yard/barn area.

Bells
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:19 AM
Can you fence your dog in? We are surrounded by coyotes (desert SW) and the only way to keep them out is fence them out. I even have free range chickens in our yard that they have yet to get (well except for the few chickens that have jumped our fence).

JCS
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:27 AM
My husband shoots at them when he sees one too close. Not to hit them, mind you, but to scare them off. We have free range chickens and have never lost one to a coyote (we've had them four years).

rustbreeches
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:34 AM
Trapping will take more time and effort than it is worth, because you will also get cats, coons, dogs. Shooting them is so much easier

downen
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:48 AM
I don't know if this will be helpful or not, but here (NW IL) the coyotes are all over the place. Often when I feed at night they sound like they are just a few 100 feet out. I don't worry about my dogs (they are half-Bassets, we HAVE to fence them! :)) Anyway, whenever I hear them and get out my flashlight, they shut up and SCRAM! The light seems to really scare them. I've never even caught sight of one in my flashlight, even though I could tell later they were quite close. Anyway, I'm thinking those motion-detecting lights might be helpful at least in keeping them away from your buildings and such.

sisu27
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:49 AM
Coyote have been here (North America) longer than anything....you can't get rid of them. You kill a dumb one and the smart ones breed more smart ones to make up for the loss of the dumb one. Seriously. When pressured they just have bigger litters.

Discourage the pack you are dealing with.

Has anyone actually tried the trapping and scaring the $hit out of them method for making your land an inhospitable place? Considering they are highly intelligent I would think this would prove effective.

1ofEach
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:57 AM
This is the first time they have not been shot at when they have been seen. They are getting bolder.

Deckchick: He is trained to bark. This was very unusual for my dog to not bark.

Bells: No I can't fence my yard in. We live in the middle of a 50 acre field that is farmed all around us.

I am not getting a leg trap nor will I poison. There is currently a contest in our county to kill the most coyotes because they are so overpopulated right now. Obviously, I have to do something to show them that my land is not a happy place to feast.

If they are this bold, they need killed.

RougeEmpire
Mar. 29, 2011, 12:54 PM
I would suggest in investing in one or two Livestock Guarding Dogs. They will KILL coyotes and even eat them. It's a matter of fighting fire with fire. Shooting, posioning and trapping coyotes wont make a dent in the population. However bringing in a bigger badder "predator" will drive them out. There is a reason why they have been used for thousands of years.

wireweiners
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:20 PM
I must have the most civilized coyotes in the country. I hear them all the time, sometimes quite close and see them fairly frequently. I have never seen a pack, just a breeding pair and occasionally a breeding pair with a couple of half grown pups that are learning to hunt. We haven't lost a calf to coyotes in years and my brother free ranged his goats and never lost a one. Granted, the goats did come to the house at night. My dogs will bark at them but seem to have enough sense not to take one on. If they come face to face with a coyote, they will do a lot of challenging and posturing but aren't particularly anxious to engage in battle. The only time they have actually taken on a coyote, there were two dogs to on coyote and the dogs held their own until I intervened.

As far as trapping them, my neighbor used to trap them and sell them to people who had "fox pens" and held fox hound trials. He used a special kind of leg hold trap or snare that was designed to hold the coyote but not injure it. I believe he used a lure made of female bobcat urine or female coyote in heat urine. You can buy them from hunting supply stores like Gander Mountain or Bass Pro Shops. I don't think you will have much luck catching one with a Hav-a-Hart type live trap using food for bait unless it is a very young, very hungry coyote. They are too smart for that.

I like my coyotes but I might feel differently if they were eating my livestock or pets. They are very curious and will stop and look at you if you whistle at them. I've even had them take a step or two toward me.

wildlifer
Mar. 29, 2011, 04:06 PM
If you trap/kill/remove a coyote, another one will take its place. That will not get rid of your problem.

This is very true. Removing an animal from the environment just opens the niche for another one to move in. Coyote packs will also amp up their reproductive efforts when the population is pressured by increased mortality. You are better off figuring out a way to coexist with the pack you have than you are killing them.

Bells
Mar. 29, 2011, 05:07 PM
I live in the middle of a 40 acre tract that is farmed/some not owned by us around us. I fenced in 2 acres to let me sleep well at night and not worry during the day.

Foxtrot's
Mar. 29, 2011, 07:27 PM
OP - what kind of dog do you have?

crosscreeksh
Mar. 29, 2011, 08:31 PM
When I saw this post the first answer that came to mind was...your favorite cat (or pet dog!!)!!! I agree with the others. I think a coyote is too smart to get himself in a trap!! Our Great Pyrennes keeps them at arms length, but when there was snow on the ground the tracks were very thick and very close to our barns. Recently there have been several cases in our area of coyotes killing calves as they were being born. YUCK!!! And around here they ARE getting much bigger.

1ofEach
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:10 PM
Foxtrot-I have a 100# Blackmouth Cur.

I was perfectly willing to tolerate them when I heard them howling at the noon siren and the yipping at night. I will not tolerate the teeth marks on my dog's legs. My dog is my family and I will protect him. I understand the whole population dynamics etc, but I will not have a predator around my land that will attack within 100 ft of my house. My husband and I decided against the trap idea. My emotions were getting the better of me when I agreed to him buying a trap, but I'm not content with just letting them be.

Bluey
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:21 PM
Foxtrot-I have a 100# Blackmouth Cur.

I was perfectly willing to tolerate them when I heard them howling at the noon siren and the yipping at night. I will not tolerate the teeth marks on my dog's legs. My dog is my family and I will protect him. I understand the whole population dynamics etc, but I will not have a predator around my land that will attack within 100 ft of my house. My husband and I decided against the trap idea. My emotions were getting the better of me when I agreed to him buying a trap, but I'm not content with just letting them be.

If you have that aggressive coyotes, shooting some so others stay away is always a good idea.
Wildlife is fine around where they are supposed to be, but that is not right close to where we have our houses and barns.
You will feel bad shooting some coyotes, but worse after they kill your pets.

Now, if we let pets wander, not keep them with us or penned, then, well, we should have been protecting them better.

That is why we keep any dogs confined and don't have barn cats any more, as they didn't last long, were just serving as wildlife snacks.:no:

deckchick
Mar. 29, 2011, 10:16 PM
I agree with Bluey, you seem to have at least one that is not afraid to be close to your house, I would be shooting that coyote at the first opportunity.

It is a fine balance between living with wildlife and protecting your animals. Our animals should always come first.

Good luck.

Foxtrot's
Mar. 29, 2011, 10:34 PM
I hate the thought of shooting any wildlife and I am sure your 100# dog would be able to take care of himself. We have a lot of coyotes around and it is our duty to keep our stock safely penned. But ours are little fellows, basically timid.
If you fear for your dog, then I suspect it is not a full coyote - probably a cur-dog, or coy-dog. Soon there will be a lot of voles and rodents around which will take care of a lot of your problem. Coyote attacks on larger animals are rare, but by no means unheard of. Sounds like you have a great deal of coyotes in your hood.

You could get a llama - "Squire" as he is called around here does a good job of protecting his sheep :)

Now I'm going to google "Blackmouth cur".

birdsong
Mar. 29, 2011, 10:40 PM
I would suggest in investing in one or two Livestock Guarding Dogs. They will KILL coyotes and even eat them. It's a matter of fighting fire with fire. Shooting, posioning and trapping coyotes wont make a dent in the population. However bringing in a bigger badder "predator" will drive them out. There is a reason why they have been used for thousands of years.


Best solution. Seriously!

http://www.lgd.org/

http://akbashrescue.blogspot.com/

wireweiners
Mar. 30, 2011, 10:11 AM
When I saw this post the first answer that came to mind was...your favorite cat (or pet dog!!)!!! I agree with the others. I think a coyote is too smart to get himself in a trap!! Our Great Pyrennes keeps them at arms length, but when there was snow on the ground the tracks were very thick and very close to our barns. Recently there have been several cases in our area of coyotes killing calves as they were being born. YUCK!!! And around here they ARE getting much bigger.

I've never heard of calves being killed during birth. Coyotes are attracted to the after birth but if mom and baby are healthy, mom will usually fend them off. A good herd bull will also defend them.

Several years ago, I had some first calf heifers in a small pasture where I could watch them closely. I was checking the heifers when I noticed one of our older cows calving in the pasture next to the heifers. I hung around until she finished calving and went out to check on her and the calf. My catahoula mix, Katy, now at the Bridge, was with me. As we approached the cow I notice a coyote easing toward the cow and calf and saw its mate in the bushes along the fence row. When Katy noticed the coyote, she challenged him. The coyote went into this aggressive posturing behavior. They arch their back, gape their mouth open in a snarl, and move toward you in this sideways, hopping motion. Really weird to see. When the coyote did this toward Katy, I yelled and Mr. Coyote turned his attention to ME!:eek: I found a stick, yelled some more and about that time the bull and the rest of the cows started coming over to the cow and calf. So the coyotes beat a retreat.

I think a 100# black mouth cur would be more than capable of handling the average coyote. My dogs will bark and carry on when they hear or smell the coyotes but seem to have sense enough not to engage them in a fight. I did have a neighbor that used to have a pair of Irish wolfhounds. He would run them on coyotes. Those two would close on the coyote, knock it off its feet, then finish him off in a heartbeat. When my brother was a young, crazy teen, he and his crazy goat roper friends would rope them. Rope them, turn horse in opposite direction, the coyote hits the end of the rope and breaks its neck.

dawglover
Mar. 30, 2011, 10:34 AM
yes, a big black mouth cur could hold his own against one coyote BUT if it lures him back towards the pack, he's a goner.

Keep a gun handy and your dog under supervision.

rustbreeches
Mar. 30, 2011, 12:20 PM
Anybody opposed to killing coyotes will feel differently after they have come up in your barn and threatened your child(2 legged or 4). Or when you had to shoot a newborn calf after you went out for night check and saw that a coyote had come up in the maternity barn and was eating it alive. We dairy so mama cows are pulled off after they clean the calf. When they start getting aggressive/unafraid you really have to go after them. It had gotten so bad at one point that nobody went unarmed. Feed truck driver had a 12 ga. Hubby and I had .22s and the 5yo kept a pellet gun on her. It also helps keep scrap metal thieves at bay. I swear if you had told me 5 years ago I was going to fully embrace my inner Clampett (Beverly Hillbilly's) I would have laughed.

RougeEmpire
Mar. 30, 2011, 01:14 PM
Anybody opposed to killing coyotes will feel differently after they have come up in your barn and threatened your child(2 legged or 4). Or when you had to shoot a newborn calf after you went out for night check and saw that a coyote had come up in the maternity barn and was eating it alive. We dairy so mama cows are pulled off after they clean the calf. When they start getting aggressive/unafraid you really have to go after them. It had gotten so bad at one point that nobody went unarmed. Feed truck driver had a 12 ga. Hubby and I had .22s and the 5yo kept a pellet gun on her. It also helps keep scrap metal thieves at bay. I swear if you had told me 5 years ago I was going to fully embrace my inner Clampett (Beverly Hillbilly's) I would have laughed.

I don't think anyone here is opposed to killing coyotes to protect your self, your children, your property or your livestock :rolleyes:

I think everyone agrees if the thing comes at you KILL IT. The POINT IS shooting what coyotes you see wont do jack shit to stop them from encroaching. Hell the federal govement tried to erradicate them and coudn't! Posioning, killing and trapping just allowes OTHER coyotes to come in and estable new territories. We are talking about basic ecology here.

So YES freakin SHOOT the ones on your lawn (that's a bold and dangerous damn coyote!) but going on coyote hunting expeditions to try and "wipe out" the coyotes in your area is like trying to erradicate mosquites...it aint gonna happen.

Herdsmen have known this for a very long time and employed Livestock Guarding Dogs millenia ago. The fact is you could shoot and kill coyotes all day and night and never make a dent in the population (same thing goes for armadillos and skunks for that matter). The only way to keep really keep them out is with a big nasty dog BRED to establish and keep a territory.

rustbreeches
Mar. 30, 2011, 01:44 PM
Yes there is at least on poster on here advocating to not kill coyotes. Great. That is their choice. Once we eliminated the overly aggressive ones 3 years ago we have not had any problems with them coming in close to the barns. Coyotes in fields don't bother me but if they start becoming too comfortable in farmyards, barnyards etc they need to be shot. Did I say go on a mass killing spree and eradicate coyotes? We could more easily control the illegal alien population than coyotes. But coyotes who are aggressive or desensitized to humans need to go. And a big nasty dog is just what I want running around our farm with the kids. The heeler has done well enough rousting them at night.

deckchick
Mar. 30, 2011, 03:17 PM
Coyotes are opportunistic, they will kill newborn calves, my neighbours have lost a couple to them. They also have some calves with very short tails when the coyotes have grabbed them, but Momma Cow, or the herd saved the calf from death.

Coyotes around here are a necessary part of the circle of farm life. They kill a TON of gophers and other critters.

Everything is a balance, if they respect my barnyard and my animals, I have no problem with them. They encroach on my territory, they die.

crosscreeksh
Mar. 30, 2011, 03:54 PM
Wireweiners - yes, there have been several calves eaten as they were being born this year. A cow with a difficult birth is not able to get up and fend them off the baby in time. We have people around here (serious cattle country) who's job is to kill coyotes. Most use trained greyhounds, others just a highpowered rifle and a good aim. They are becoming a serious problem around here!! The availability of dead stock, afterbirth and small game has them thriving. I've had to stop letting my Great Pyr off leash when out of his fenced yard because last Jan. 2010 he ran a GSD sized coyote out in front of an 18 wheeler!! It could have been my dog and I won't take that chance again!!

Bluey
Mar. 30, 2011, 04:30 PM
Wireweiners - yes, there have been several calves eaten as they were being born this year. A cow with a difficult birth is not able to get up and fend them off the baby in time. We have people around here (serious cattle country) who's job is to kill coyotes. Most use trained greyhounds, others just a highpowered rifle and a good aim. They are becoming a serious problem around here!! The availability of dead stock, afterbirth and small game has them thriving. I've had to stop letting my Great Pyr off leash when out of his fenced yard because last Jan. 2010 he ran a GSD sized coyote out in front of an 18 wheeler!! It could have been my dog and I won't take that chance again!!

A few years ago, our neighbor went to do an evening check on his older cows and one was calving and he counted 11 or 12 coyotes laying around in a half circle around her.
They had already torn at the calf, that was half way out and dying and had eaten some of her hind end, so he had to shoot her.
She didn't seem to be having any problem, was a normal looking birth, just the coyotes were harassing her, it seems and waited until she had to lay down to have the calf to get to her.

Gruesome, but yes, if you have too many coyotes, that is what can happen.
He thinned them and has not had those kinds of problems since.

We know never to put a steer alone in a pen, always at least two, as one is no match for coyotes harassing it and have found some partly eaten still alive in the morning, sometimes even with others in the pen with them.

Coyotes are opportunistic and not shy.

You need to discourage them from coming around dwellings and if some won't stay away, shoot them.:(

1ofEach
Mar. 31, 2011, 06:43 AM
They were back yesterday at 8am. I cannot help but feel a little scared. I was about to go out to take care of my horses when my dog started barking like a maniac and I saw them. There were at least 5 of them moving down my far tree line onto my property. I emptied a revolver towards them (they were way too far away to hit). I was resistant to learning to use a rifle, but no more. My lessons were supposed to start last night, but instead we had a wonderful late March snow.

I know coyote attacks on people are very rare, but several days a week I take care of my horses at 5:30am. That is a good 1.5 hrs before sunrise and my barn is over 600ft from the house. Based on what have I been seeing, they are still very active an hour after sunrise. Now I have to carry a gun with me to my barn. I don't like living like this.

deckchick
Mar. 31, 2011, 08:40 AM
1ofEach, The fact that you saw them on the FAR tree line is good, they are staying away from your barn. Really, they are not going to attack you, like Bluey said, they are opportunistic, they will take the easy meal.

Attacks on humans from coyotes are extremely rare, a normal coyote is afraid of us. If one stands up to you, then you have a problem.

I'm glad you are taking some lessons on rifle shooting. I'm not a gun person, but when you have animals, you need to know how to defend them, and put them down if necessary.

Don't live in fear, you will be OK.

Mudroom
Mar. 31, 2011, 10:34 AM
I can't resist passing along an email I got yesterday:


The Sierra Club and the U.S. Forest Service were presenting an alternative to the Wyoming ranchers for controlling the coyote population. It seems that after years of the ranchers using the tried and true method of shooting or trapping the predators, the Sierra Club had a "more humane" solution to this issue. What they were proposing was for the animals to be captured alive. The males would then be castrated and let loose again. This was ACTUALLY proposed by the Sierra Club and by the U.S. Forest Service. All of the ranchers thought about this amazing idea for a couple of minutes. Finally an old fellow wearing a big cowboy hat in the back of the conference room stood up, tipped his hat back and said; "Son, I don't think you understand our problem here... these coyotes ain't f&$kin' our sheep... they're eatin' 'em!" The meeting never really got back to order.

Mosey_2003
Mar. 31, 2011, 11:12 AM
Would using a paint ball gun be a good deterrent method?

deckchick
Mar. 31, 2011, 01:30 PM
Haha! If the coyote is close enough to hit with a paintball gun, he's too dang close, get the real gun out.

Mudroom, that's funny!

JSwan
Mar. 31, 2011, 02:21 PM
"Son, I don't think you understand our problem here... these coyotes ain't f&$kin' our sheep... they're eatin' 'em!" The meeting never really got back to order.


:lol::lol:

The one that got too close to the house was not afraid at all. He came up into the yard and tried to get into chicken coop. I thought it was a fox and ran out (in my flannel jammies) to chase it off. Didn't quite see it but I could tell it wasn't a fox by the way the dogs were acting. Usually they'll chase a fox away, but this time they wouldn't run off into the night, but stayed around the coop and watch light, sniffing the ground and growling.

An hour or so later my neighbor shot it; it was coming out from behind my fenceline.

The taxidermist told me he'll be ready for pickup by the end of October. ;)

MistyBlue
Mar. 31, 2011, 04:39 PM
Paintball guns work very well on pita animals. Deters them without leaving an opening for a new predator to move in.

Coyote are smart and will learn to stay away from people carrying anything that looks like a rifle.

JSwan, I so want to see photos of the stuffed 'yote when you get it back. With an Acme rocket strapped to it's back and wearing roller skates. :winkgrin:

I've always wanted a moose head for over the fireplace. But I've never had a house with a big enough fireplace/wall/ceiling combo to accommodate a moose head. :no:

OP, coyotes are very unlikely to attack you. Some may come close to people from time to time, but by nature they're very curious and nosy. Half the time I'm out on trails I have at least one trailing along with me. Whoever came up with "curiosity killed the cat" never met a coyote. :D

pj
Mar. 31, 2011, 04:49 PM
I live in the middle of a 40 acre tract that is farmed/some not owned by us around us. I fenced in 2 acres to let me sleep well at night and not worry during the day.
Sounds like the most sensible thing to do to me.
Around here fence that keeps stuff out is every bit as important as fence that keeps stuff in.

We live in the middle of timberland and I've raised goats and chicken for nearly forty years. Although we have a healthy pack of coyote neighbors not one time have they ever attempted to bother the animals on our farm in their fenced acres.

awm
Apr. 1, 2011, 10:17 AM
My laugh for the day!!!!!!!!

Hard to swallow that the U.S. Forest Service is even listening to the
sierra club (small letters on purpose!)






I can't resist passing along an email I got yesterday:


The Sierra Club and the U.S. Forest Service were presenting an alternative to the Wyoming ranchers for controlling the coyote population. It seems that after years of the ranchers using the tried and true method of shooting or trapping the predators, the Sierra Club had a "more humane" solution to this issue. What they were proposing was for the animals to be captured alive. The males would then be castrated and let loose again. This was ACTUALLY proposed by the Sierra Club and by the U.S. Forest Service. All of the ranchers thought about this amazing idea for a couple of minutes. Finally an old fellow wearing a big cowboy hat in the back of the conference room stood up, tipped his hat back and said; "Son, I don't think you understand our problem here... these coyotes ain't f&$kin' our sheep... they're eatin' 'em!" The meeting never really got back to order.

brokenarrowdj
Apr. 4, 2011, 04:26 PM
The coyote's in OK are very brazen. My husband and his fellow ranchers carry high powered rifles 24/7 and shoot on sight...in any pasture in this part of the country. He is regularly called on to shoot coyotes for a neighboring rancher with a poor 'shot'. We have tried trapping and the coyotes will literally get close enough to take a dump on the leg trap and not get caught. We have hair sheep and have a good guard donkey and tight fences. The coyote's will come within 150-200 yards of our house scoping, but we have been lucky and not lost any of the sheep yet. I have one house cat that is also a great hunter. He leaves for a week at a time on walkabout and I fear he will become coyote bait. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to keep him inside all of the time when he is intent on getting outside.

saddlesore
Apr. 4, 2011, 06:29 PM
Wow, its interesting to read how the Coyotes are an issue in so many places. We live in Minnesota - at the edge of the metro area - and they run in packs right across our lawn. The dogs bark and we've called them in with the Coyotes standing 100 feet from our back door. One neighbor's horse was attacked by a pack.

But please don't set traps. We see lots of issues with traps catching pets and animals other than the Coyotes.

We have a group of hunters who come out periodically, but they only make a short term dent in the problem.