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View Full Version : What do you all think of this VERY innovative watering product???



TrueColours
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:32 AM
Came across this very neat new product:

http://www.gizoo.co.uk/Products/HomeGarden/Home/H2GOBag.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btkvxLAkpYQ&feature=player_embedded

And I am looking at getting the Canadian rights to it and could probably also ship orders to the States until if/when they get a distributor set up in that country as well

Retail price point would be in the $15.00 - $20.00 range - max.

Would you buy one for the farm and/or home?

I think its brilliant. I have 3 water troughs that are out of reach of the hose and 2 of those entail 8 buckets of water to fill them each (so either 8 trips with a single bucket or 4 trip with double buckets) and 1 entails 20 single trips or 10 double trips.

I know when we sunk the posts out front for our new sign, we did EXACTLY what that funny video showed - very carefully and gingerly took buckets of water out to mix the cement in and had most of it slosh out in the process before we got there ...

Would appreciate any and all comments - good, bad or otherwise!

Thanks so much ... :)

cyriz's mom
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:34 AM
I agree. It's brilliant! And much more attractive price-wise than the algae free trough!

TrueColours
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:37 AM
I agree. It's brilliant! And much more attractive price-wise than the algae free trough!


:lol: :lol: :lol:

Yeah - I really loved that idea but am so glad that I did post that thread and heard comments from everyone about it before I took the plunge and ordered a bunch in to sell ...

Im grateful that no one held back on THAT idea and let me know exactly what you all thought about it!!! :D

tenuousatbest
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:46 AM
I love it, and the price is right!

It also kind of reminds me of this, which is marketed for the developing world but could probably serve a horsey purpose, too. http://www.qdrum.co.za/about

mg
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:50 AM
Um, that looks AWESOME! In order to fill the troughs in my lower fields, I need to put large barrels in the bed of the RTV, fill up with the hose, drive down to the field, and then dip buckets in to the barrels and dump them into the trough. This looks way easier and less time consuming! I like the price point as well.

Tamara in TN
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:52 AM
Would appreciate any and all comments - good, bad or otherwise!

Thanks so much ... :)

with water weighing 8lb/gal it looks like a good way to hurt my back (again)

Tamara

ayrabz
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:18 AM
I think its brilliant as well ! Tamara, I get what you're saying, but the fact remains....for those who NEED a way to haul water somewhere, with no source, its still better on the back than hauling buckets. Now, what I will interject is this: anyway to incorporate a screw on/watertight SHORT hose addition connection with an on /off vaulve? I would think this would alleviate any 'waste' pour off/etc, as in: one thing the bag pix/video does not show is what happens when bag gets low? is it 100% accurate in pouring even then? an attached short length hose with on off vaulve may be a great addition.

OnePerfectRide
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:40 AM
The problem that I see is that most troughs are taller than the wheelbarrow, so you wouldn't be able to pour it into the trough.

Bluey
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:53 AM
They have had those collapsible water bladders in all sizes for long time.
We used to have a pillow tank that fit in the back of the pickup, about 250 gallons, I think it was.
They sell them for potable water, those are blue and for "gray water", those are orange:

http://www.tank-depot.com/product.aspx?id=866

http://www.promolife.com/disaster-preparation/heavy-duty-collapsible-emergency-water-bladder/prod_1403.html

TrueColours
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:59 AM
Bluey - great idea I guess if you need a lot of water and can drive the truck as well to where you are going.

But - the 25 gallon one on that site is $245.00 and 25 gallons = 94 litres

The H2GO one is 80 litres, so just underneath that capacity, and is $15.00 - $20.00. A HUGE difference in pricing

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:01 PM
200 lbs is a LOT of weight to push on a wheelbarrow, even on level ground, so that would be about 25 gallons. It holds about 20. I have not tried to slowly dump something that heavy, so that would be a question - would it try to pull you right over, dumping it fast? Holding it for that long would also be a challenge to dump slowly. So maybe 15 gallons, comfortably?

Bluey
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:02 PM
You may contact local manufacturers of those products and see what they would make what you need for.

Retail prices for plastic products are generally 100s of times the cost, middlemen know that.;)

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:10 PM
If I can drive my truck to where it is needed, I just put an empty water trough on it, and siphon or dip & dump from there - easy to fill water troughs.

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:15 PM
A cube cooler on wheels also works great, and holds about 15+ gallons

trubandloki
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:20 PM
Good point about holding it pour into a bucket, Fairview.

It to me seems like one of those things that looks way cool at first but in practice it would quickly be set aside and not used because of how much more work it is to use in the long run.

Fill it and push the wheel barrow to trough that is too high to pour it directly into so you pour into a bucket (that you some how have to monitor while you balance the wheel barrow while it pours). Pour bucket into trough and repeat until bladder is empty and wheel back and start over.

Just Wondering
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:25 PM
A HUGE difference in pricing

Depends if you compare quality and longevity.

sk_pacer
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:31 PM
Another not so new idea - water bags can be purchased in almost any RV dealership or camping supply store. Range from 5 gallons (imp) to 50 gallons and more for water storage in RVs and camper trailers.

Kate66
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:33 PM
Might be worth buying one and trying it? I think it looks great for those buckets where you can't get a hose to - because in reality those are the only buckets you really need to carry - but I do wonder how 1) readily the wheelbarrow would tip with that weight in it and 2) whether it wouldn't do your back in anyway.

Have you reached out to the UK folks to see if they have ever either heard or it or used it.

We are facing having a pasture where we can't get water run to it, but are looking to put one of these on the back of the truck, take to pasture and fill trough. You can attach a hose to these. Obviously not the same as for buckets but definitely for troughs.

http://www.tractorsupply.com/pco-tank-50-gal--2125814

Brian
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:36 PM
I solved our watering problems year around by converting an old sprayer tank into a water cart. I plumbed a water line from the tank to a "trash pump" with a main line to two over sized spray nozzles in the rear. I also T'd into the main line for another separate discharge line. I then put on/off valves for each line. One to fill water tanks with and one to spray a 30 foot wide area to water the indoor for controlling dust. We use this to fill outside water tanks in the winter or water tanks away from hydrants year around. It takes about 5 minutes to fill a 200 gallon water tank. We have 6 outdoor water tanks. We spend at most 10-15 minutes each day filling tanks in the winter. Fortunately our barn is heated so we can keep the cart filled in the event of a power outage.

Our arena is 90 x 120 and 200 gallons makes a near perfect moisture content in the footing. The best part is an even distribution of the water with no puddling.

Here's a picture:

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/Watercart.jpg

Alagirl
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:38 PM
:lol::lol::lol:

I saw them last year or so in a magazine in Germany. Didn't have net access at the time and forgot I had written the webside down.

I think those are awesome! :cool:

sk_pacer
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:49 PM
Here ya go - http://www.watertanks.com/category/11/

Bluey
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:55 PM
Here ya go - http://www.watertanks.com/category/11/

That is what we had, thank you.
Worked fine and many years ago, those were not very pricey.

Calvincrowe
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:56 PM
I like it! It is often too wet here to get a vehicle to a trough. I don't use the big 100+ gallon water troughs, as my two boys don't drink enough to justify the filling and inevitable dumping of dirty water a few days later.

I use a muck bucket or two in the pasture and this would fill them easily.

At a show, this would be great for filling buckets, when the spigot is a mile away or hose won't reach the stalls.

TrueColours
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:02 PM
Here ya go - http://www.watertanks.com/category/11/


ok - so the 75 gallon one is the smallest one at $490.00

For large cattle operations, makes total sense to go that route but for a few horses / hobby farms / home use / construction areas with tight quarters, you wont be able to get a truck in there nor would you want to to fill a 20 or 40 gallon water trough

I guess in the same way as if you are pulling heavy construction equipment around you wouldnt use an F150 to do so - you'd use a 350 or 450, in the same way if you needed to fill a lot of 200 gallon water troughs, you wouldnt wheel a wheelbarrow around with 80 LITRES in there at a time - you'd use one of these huge 1000 gallon bladders in the back of a truck instead!!! :lol:

sk_pacer
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:15 PM
I've seen smaller water bladders for sale in Canada - they are slanted to the RV camping people but are used for carrying water for almost any reason. The range of collapsible tanks and water bladders available in Canada runs from 4 litres to thousands of gallons........someone here has one around the 150 gallon range that he hauls water for a few cows in, or did at one point. Says he got it at Peavey Mart, which is not in Ontario. The site I posted was for industrial/oilfield stuff, not domestic use, just happend to be at the top of the google list. Should have looked farther but didn't. Going to look again for domestic use (light duty)

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:34 PM
Rather than that huge price for a tank, I would just spend the money on several hoses, hooked together, and leave it along the path. You could even arrange it so be able to drain at both ends, over a high spot, or middle with a middle valve.

ThisTooShallPass
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:38 PM
I solved our watering problems year around by converting an old sprayer tank into a water cart. Here's a picture:

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/Watercart.jpg

I sure hope you NEVER used pesticides in that tank. :eek:

Blugal
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:48 PM
I wouldn't buy it - sloshing around while pushing the wheelbarrow would actually be worse for my back then bending at the knees and lifting water buckets. Also I wonder how easy it is to get the second half to pour nicely (and the first half not to tip the bucket over or miss completely). Plus once poured, you still have to lift the bucket into the horse's stall.

ThisTooShallPass
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:00 PM
Depends if you compare quality and longevity.

THIS!

I haul water to some stock. Use 55 gallon drums when only filling 100 gallon tanks, & siphon it off. Also huge hard plastic square tanks for the truck beds.

I paid $7 for the blue food grade 55 gallon drums, & $40 (used) for the huge tanks. My tanks will outlast that wheel barrel bladder by literal years.

Those blue food grade drums are everywhere across the US. In fact cheaper to buy one used & ship it cross country than what TCS wants for most of their tanks in same gallon size range.


WEIGHT ISSUE:
Seriously, how many women, or even men, here can handle a wheel barrel filled with that much water?! That is a LOT of weight. A lot of SHIFTING weight. If the weight alone does not get you, it shifting around sure will.

Brian
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:20 PM
I sure hope you NEVER used pesticides in that tank. :eek:


We had the same concern as you before we used it. The old sprayer had sat outside in a junk pile for several years when we picked it up. As a precaution, we used several gallons of pine sol, then chlorinated bleach and ran several tank fulls of water through it to "flush" the tank before we filled any of the horse water tanks. Have used it now for almost 3 years with no issues.

Alagirl
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:35 PM
THIS!

I haul water to some stock. Use 55 gallon drums when only filling 100 gallon tanks, & siphon it off. Also huge hard plastic square tanks for the truck beds.

I paid $7 for the blue food grade 55 gallon drums, & $40 (used) for the huge tanks. My tanks will outlast that wheel barrel bladder by literal years.

Those blue food grade drums are everywhere across the US. In fact cheaper to buy one used & ship it cross country than what TCS wants for most of their tanks in same gallon size range.


WEIGHT ISSUE:
Seriously, how many women, or even men, here can handle a wheel barrel filled with that much water?! That is a LOT of weight. A lot of SHIFTING weight. If the weight alone does not get you, it shifting around sure will.

they make 2 wheeled ones :)

mg
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:02 PM
I guess I was thinking less about putting the bladder in a wheelbarrow and more about sticking it in the bed of our Kubota RTV. A wheelbarrow wouldn't be tall enough to pour into our large Rubbermaid troughs anyhow. I'd definitely be willing to spend $15-20 to cut down on the hassle of filling drums and hand dipping/pouring with buckets.

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:09 PM
they make 2 wheeled ones :)

I find the 2-wheeled ones are harder on my back as they really fight you on turns. Water will still slosh front to back.

katarine
Mar. 28, 2011, 05:32 PM
I loathe a wheelbarrow, and tipping my two wheel rubbermaid cart with that thing in it would be hot, strenous, boring work.

I'm thinkin' no. I can buy some of these (http://www.amazon.com/5-Gallon-Collapsible-Water-Carrier/dp/B0025LFIZE)if I need to tote water to fill a horse show water bucket. Oh, wait, I already did that :)

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 28, 2011, 07:35 PM
I can buy some of these (http://www.amazon.com/5-Gallon-Collapsible-Water-Carrier/dp/B0025LFIZE)if I need to tote water

Or these http://www.google.com/products/catalog?oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&q=kerosene+can&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=17767055309622867049&sa=X&ei=3hqRTbeEG8mx0QG_t4zUDg&ved=0CCoQ8wIwAA#

TrueColours
Mar. 29, 2011, 07:33 AM
I have made the decision to get this product in and I have been given exclusivity in Canada for it. Contracts have been signed, waiting for the samples and artwork to come in, then I will put in my order for a few skids of product to start. Amazon.com will have it on their website shortly, I will be putting it into various tack stores and feed stores as well and until if / when they appoint someone for the USA on an exclusive basis, I will also be able to ship orders to the States as well. [edit]

I am REALLY excited to be getting this product in! It really looks fabulous and Ive also heard from several friends in the UK that have bought one and used it and they said its absolutely brilliant and saves them a lot of time and labour - especially at horse shows when the water is far away from the ring or from stalls ... :)

Nojacketrequired
Mar. 29, 2011, 10:37 AM
How does it attach to the wheelbarrow so then when you tip it, it doesn't slide out?

NJR

katarine
Mar. 29, 2011, 10:51 AM
the write up describes a grippy, non slip backing...

hundredacres
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:11 AM
with water weighing 8lb/gal it looks like a good way to hurt my back (again)

Tamara

LOL That was exactly what I saw! Youch. I also hate a wheel barrow and avoid using one at alll costs.

There is another tote available for hauling water in 5 gallon buckets via a hand cart contraption.......can't recall the maker but it's handy (though expensive) and it also had a saddle rack, etc. for smooth mobility at horse shoes, etc.

Alagirl
Mar. 29, 2011, 12:44 PM
Having manouvered a wheel barrel loaded up with hay bales higher than I can see across huge cobbles, I don't see a problem with a little water in it.

Like I said, I saw it in a garden magazine last year or so in Germany, one of the higher end ones. They gave it rave revues.

I am excited to hear you are getting the rights for it and I hope you do well with it.


(now I might have to go back and revisit my notes..they had some innovative use for what boils down to left over pant legs turned into chaps to prevent stuff from falling into your shoes...)

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:27 PM
Having manouvered a wheel barrel loaded up with hay bales higher than I can see across huge cobbles, I don't see a problem with a little water in it.

I do that too, but 4 bales is a b*tch to move, especially on a windy day, and it often crashes over.

Easy to try the weight for anyone, just put 3-4 bags of grain in a wheelbarrow, and push it around. It is really a strain to move 4, and it does not move/slosh. Keeping the tires well inflated helps though, just don't try to push it thru a muddy patch.

TrueColours
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:50 PM
Like I said, I saw it in a garden magazine last year or so in Germany, one of the higher end ones. They gave it rave revues.



Exactly. And not only in Germany either. These are the other awards that have been won with it and why I was interested in looking into it further for Canada and they are not just equine related but home and garden as well:

- Spoga Innovative Horse Award 2010

- Winner of Innovation of the Year at Beta International 2010

- Gold Winner for Industry Awards Gardening Equipment Products 2009

- Winner of Garden Answers Magazine Best Innovation Award 2008

The one thing I found very interesting as well is that it was featured on BBC's Dragon's Den and generated interest from the Dragon's in this product as well :)


I do that too, but 4 bales is a b*tch to move, especially on a windy day, and it often crashes over.

That is truly bizarre. I load my wheelbarrow up with 4-5 bales at a time and go through snow, slush and mud to get to the barn and yeah - sometimes its heavier going but Ive never tipped it yet ...

hundredacres
Mar. 29, 2011, 02:10 PM
Here's the one I was thinking of earlier - not cheap but practical (and looks easier to transport):


http://justhorsnaround.com/

Go Fish
Mar. 29, 2011, 03:39 PM
Innovative? I've had something similar to this in the dressing room of my trailer for well over 5 years. Can't remember where I bought it or how much it cost. I do seem to recall that it came from an RV store.

I'll try and remember to look next time I go out to the barn.

Kate66
Mar. 30, 2011, 12:05 PM
I have made the decision to get this product in and I have been given exclusivity in Canada for it. Contracts have been signed, waiting for the samples and artwork to come in, then I will put in my order for a few skids of product to start. Amazon.com will have it on their website shortly, I will be putting it into various tack stores and feed stores as well and until if / when they appoint someone for the USA on an exclusive basis, I will also be able to ship orders to the States as well. [edit]

I am REALLY excited to be getting this product in! It really looks fabulous and Ive also heard from several friends in the UK that have bought one and used it and they said its absolutely brilliant and saves them a lot of time and labour - especially at horse shows when the water is far away from the ring or from stalls ... :)

Good for you for trying something new. I truly hope it's successful, and if it's not - well, at least you will have tried and undoubtedly learned something which you can use next time around. I mean this sincerely.

spacytracy
Mar. 30, 2011, 07:53 PM
I think people will try it! For the price, its hard to resist.

They look very tempting to me!

TrueColours
Mar. 31, 2011, 10:30 AM
Thanks everyone. :) Im very glad that I did make the decision to go forward with this product

The next year should be a lot of fun indeed ... :)

colorfan
Apr. 1, 2011, 11:04 AM
What a great idea!

Maybe they have been around but this is the first I have seen them.

Even partly full it is easier to use a wheel barrow than a bucket. I haul many buckets of water so find this very appealing.

Why would a trough be higher or much higher than a wheel barrow?
Even the 400g tanks at the feed store aren't any higher than the 50 gallon tanks, just wider.

Even so, if I had to fill a huge tank with a bucket i would rather wheel barrow several bucket loads at once and bucket them into the tank right there than haul each one how far?


I am thinking I could make one out of a huge inner tube.

I have used large inner tubes around shrubs, poked little holes in the underneath, fill with water, even soaking of shrub with one fill from the hose.

Cloverbarley
Apr. 1, 2011, 12:50 PM
I think plenty of people will buy them! They're so cheap that people will be tempted to try them. I have loads of water supplies all over my farm so they wouldn't be of use to me but I do think people who don't have such a set-up would find them useful. Best of luck TC! :)

spacytracy
Apr. 1, 2011, 01:23 PM
Also, wanted to add, I noticed alot of people mentioning just putting it in the truck and hauling it down. For me, that's not an option. One, its not THAT far that a truck is warranted, and two, the place I need to drive is uneven ground, so driving a truck on a daily basis isn't really feasible. I've tried lugging buckets, I've tried wheelbarrowing buckets, but it sloshes around and by the time you get there, half of it is gone.

trubandloki
Apr. 1, 2011, 01:26 PM
I've tried wheelbarrowing buckets, but it sloshes around and by the time you get there, half of it is gone.

Put a trash bag liner into the bucket.
Fill with water, and twist or knot or whatever the trash bag shut.

When you get where you are going you will have a pretty darn almost full bucket of water.

philosoraptor
Apr. 4, 2011, 11:33 AM
It's not innovative, sorry. Any RV catalog has collapsible potable water containers like it. Put one in a wheelbarrow and you have the same thing. These come in all sizes:
http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/portable-rv-fresh-water-tank-45-gallon/1605

I personally would not use it because I'd be fighting against the sloshing around. I got this watering product called a hydrant installed by each trough. I just pull the lever and water comes out. :D For stall use, I fill the buckets the horses will drink from and I carry them into the stall to hang. If i had a whole row of buckets to fill, I'd get a hose.

lesson junkie
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:09 PM
I can't believe how many have admitted to being wheel barrow challenged. How do you get things moved in the barn and garden?

If you had a better way to water, like a hydrant, you wouldn't need one, philosoraptor-it's for those times you need water 40 feet past your longest hose, or the hose is frozen, or is finally leaking too much, or for getting water to a temporary turnout-I think it looks useful. I can see it being a lifesaver in certain situations. At that price, if you only needed it a few times a year it would be worth it.

As long as it doesn't leak...

trubandloki
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:13 PM
A bucket I already have with a trash liner in it takes care of those rare times I need to get water any distance. No reason to buy something like this, fight with it, have it get a rip while it sits around waiting to be used again.

Oh, and I admit I am wheel barrow challenged. Is there something wrong with that? And yes, I use one every day, it is how I move my manure around.

JB
Apr. 4, 2011, 01:23 PM
I can't believe how many have admitted to being wheel barrow challenged. How do you get things moved in the barn and garden?

Have you ever really wheeled a single-wheel wheelbarrow full of liquid? Sure, it can be done, have done it, but when you have something as heavy as water going whichever way it wants to, that's a lot of weight to counterbalance, and not everyone can do it. It's entirely different from carrying a stationary load, even if it weighs more.

There's a reason young horses starting out under saddle do better in their balance with a quiet rider than one who's flopping all over the place ;)

A 2-wheeled 'barrow would be better suited to carting water in a soft-sided container.

TrueColours
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:46 PM
Have you ever really wheeled a single-wheel wheelbarrow full of liquid? Sure, it can be done, have done it, but when you have something as heavy as water going whichever way it wants to, that's a lot of weight to counterbalance, and not everyone can do it.

OKay ... got the samples in today

After I take them to the Post Office and weigh them to figure out postage to Canada and the States, tomorrow's *job* will be to put it in my rickety *Mind-of-its-Own* wheelbarrow, fill it and see how easy it is to manouver around and then put it into my VERY stable *Goes-Anywhere-Through-Mud-Slop-Slush* wheelbarrow to see how well it does with that one

And if necessary, I will do this all when my daughter is here and have HER push the things around and film her and you can all see how easy / hard it is to do so. We've had a lot of rain today, so the ground will be soft tomorrow - not ideal conditions at all, so will be interesting to see how she makes out with it in adverse conditions. And if we can find any snow left anywhere at all, I'll shovel some of that down for her to push through as well ... :D

Fairview Horse Center
Apr. 4, 2011, 07:49 PM
Post a link to a video of tomorrows test use. Seeing will go a long way to selling.

Riverglen
Apr. 12, 2011, 08:13 AM
TC, it doesn't look like you have exclusivity after all (unless there are different manufacturers for this product). Lee Valley sells this exact same product for $9.95.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?p=67190&cat=2,2280,54307&ap=1

goodhors
Apr. 12, 2011, 09:33 PM
What I can't understand why folks keep arguing that wheeling, carrying, great quantities of water is "better" than using machinery? I just saw the LeeValley bag today, said it held 176 pounds of water! That is an incredible amount of weight to be muscling around on a regular basis!! I will grant that the cart/barrow used in the LeeValley photo has an INCREDIBLE wheel spread, so cart/barrow would not be wobbly EVER! But even with the mechanical advantage of cart, you have to manage the total weight of inertia to start load moving, uphill, in deeper going.

The person who said starting the truck for short distances is wasteful, evidently has never been tired enough to "hunt out the EASIEST way" of doing a job, like us LAZY folks.

The wear and tear on your BODY is inevitable when working these massive loads, will need repair if you keep doing this work very long. I have read enough posts on COTH about people and their pain, doing stalls, riding, moving loads of stuff horses need for upkeep. Chores that can't be avoided. Adding more work, HARD work seems to be a bad choice in the long run for your body parts.

Have to say that working a very physical job, we ALWAYS looked for a machine to help, an easier method of managing that job, got help when possible. Sometimes the easiest way was to do smaller loads, making several trips to finish the job without straining ourselves. It was a SAFETY factor, DO NOT HURT YOURSELF when working!! Work SMARTER, not harder to complete the tasks needed.

Sometimes even the best surgeon can't fix the damage AFTER it happens, you are NEVER the same again! Might end up with you not being able to work, manage weight, because of permanent damage. Crushed discs in spine, knees overloaded, shoulders pulled, muscles ripped off the bones. I KNOW people that deal with these body problems now. They were unwilling to ask for help, take time for several trips, make adjustments in loads so they could safely manage the job.

I also have had to deal with places that had no hydrants, barns with no winter water supply, so EVERY DROP needed to be hauled in daily. You need to think the job out, use the TRUCK to haul the big quantity of water you need to location of tank. Then you figure an easy way to unload water from truck, ATV, trailer, into the tank or tubs. Siphon hose is good, maybe a hose screwed onto mouth of bladder full of water running into tank.

I just can't believe how MANY folks want to hurt themselves hauling tonnage of water long distances!! OSHA would certainly forbid this unsafe practice in a commercial setting!! This is just an "Oh WOW" moment for me!!

Fairview Horse Center
Apr. 12, 2011, 09:52 PM
Yes, but no machinary is needed to run hoses. ;) 100' of hose is pretty easy to drain, and you can connect several together. Anyplace that it would freeze before you can drain it, the cap is going to freeze onto this bladder too. A bladder full of ice would take a really long time to thaw. Just sayin' :D