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jody jaffe
Mar. 28, 2011, 09:52 AM
I'd like to nominate Diane Kane's wonder horse, Woody. She lent me this amazing horse to help me regain confidence after an injury. I didn't think I'd be back in the show ring again, jumping. Woody didn't agree.

If you have a moment, please check out my column about him and why don't we start a thread about the wonder horses in our lives.

http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/doctor-of-confidence

thanks
Jody Jaffe

mrsbradbury
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:04 AM
I will choose one of the many cool horses. My wonder horse was Textbook, he helped me to learn to put a little style in the riding, he made me a horseman.

http://www.facebook.com/album.php?id=100000556370865&aid=2505#!/photo.php?fbid=103260529702492&set=a.101148819913663.2505.100000556370865&theater

I also swear the horse truly loved me.

potterma
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:57 AM
Jody,
I saw the article posted on my newsfeed on facebook this morning by COTH and read it. Woody sounds like an awesome guy. I had my first horse-related ER visit on Thursday and was relating a lot to your article. A pony that I just broke a few weeks ago was having a little fit and tripped over her front feet and sent me flying. Luckily, I don't remember it happening but got a concussion and a scraped up face. Like you, I was asking all the same questions over and over, lol. I really enjoyed reading your article and wish you and Woody the best of luck! I think I need to pick up your book about the Chestnut mare, that's what my crazy little thing is :lol:

jody jaffe
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:21 PM
potterma,

thanks for the reply. woody is every rider's dream date.

so sorry to hear about your injury. im sure you know this, but it bears repeating for anyone who might not: that helmet you were wearing is toast, throw it out. also, did your docs tell you to stay off a horse until your brain heals? there's the second concussion phenom that can be deadly. literally.

sorry to be such a downer when it comes to head injuries, but they are serious. when i was younger, i didn't take them seriously. i thought i'd heal and that would be that. not so. the CDC calls people who've hit their heads the walking wounded because they don't know they're wounded.

if you have a moment, check out the column i wrote about head injuries:

http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/three-step-process-beginning-brain-injury-rehabilitation

happy (safe) trails,
jody

Offset
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:32 PM
What a great article.

A couple of points you should file away Jody, should you ever need them for future 'negotiations' (the term blackmail has such negative connotations):


1) Woody Wade's mother has a little known but remarkable talent for acappella singing - she joined in with a singing troupe at a Duke horse show exhibitors party, uninvited, and was just amazing.

2) Your current trainer has been known to carry odd items around with him in his pockets at horse shows (exhibit 1: Virginia Intermont 2011).

Reagan
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:46 PM
I read your article this morning and it brought tears to my eyes. There are those horses that truly only come around once in a life time and I hope everyone has the chance to ride them at some point in their lives. They will change you forever.

I'm glad you found Woody at the right time and I hope you keep riding and showing with confidence even once Woody is retired. Good luck at all your future shows!!

jody jaffe
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:59 PM
i have nothing against strategic blackmail, especially when gordon sets the fences higher than i want. so what exactly was he carrying around with him at the show?

i need ammunition.
jj

ShaSamour
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:14 PM
Your article could be my story.

I have one of these horses right now. His name is Taz (The Quiet Man), and he's my buddy. He's a retired 20-something veteran of the grand prix ring. He's been there, done that, and gotten the t-shirt.

He's kind. He's sweet. He always gets me safely to the other side of the jump. For the first time in almost 20 years, I'm jumping around at 3' with confidence. And finally -- finally! -- I am achieving "feel". He has so much to teach me... and I'm so blessed to be his guardian.

Everyone should be lucky enough to ride a horse like this. It truly does change your life.

Lizzie
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:27 PM
Jody, your article was delightful. I too have a wonder horse - he is wonderful for many reasons - the least of which was getting me back in the ring after a fall from my young horse. I sustained a serious head injury in addition to broken bones. It was months before I could get on a horse. I started with the lead line thing (imagine at my age - lead line!). My wonder horse is a bit of a spook but never once did he spook - he took care of me as he has always done. He loves me. He was patient, kind and sensitive and helped me to get stronger. About 8 months after my fall I entered the show ring on Mr. Wonderful. I had a panic attack (not surprisingly), but Mr. Wonderful knew his job and took me over the jumps and delivered me safely back to the in gate where my Husband, trainer and dear friend were nervously watching. Long story short, we were Champion that day. Can you imagine - he is my Saint.

asterix
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:45 PM
Jody, I went over to the Chronicle looking for another article and was literally amazed to see what looked like a picture of you jumping a fence. :D

Great article, and so glad you have found Prince Charming (we are old enough to know that every woman needs both a Saint AND a Prince Charming...)!!!!

I've been clawing my way back to confidence all winter without the benefit of such a prince (my prince has been out of sorts, so I am stuck with the flipping pony himself), and it has been difficult.

Kudos to you for TRYING and succeeding, and many carrots to the prince!!!

DMK
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:48 PM
MizzWade and Woody! Can we say COTH oldie goldies? ;D

(offset, be a good dude and provide the appropriate blackmail information)

On the topic of horses worth their weight in gold, I submit exhibit A, Robbie.

Robbie is 19 and I have owned him since he was 3 going on 4 (my profile pic is from his last show back in 2008). He has done everything he needed to do and done it in fine style. I bought a yearling in 2008, showed said yearling on the line in the first half of 2009 and spent the last half of 2009 in 7 months of physical therapy after I attempted (unsuccessfully) to remove my right thumb from my hand. By then there was not much point in showing him again and he had gracefully slipped into the role of trail horse and trainer of my young horse (5 minutes into teaching the youngster to pony I was demoted to ass't trainer and I think that's where I have been ever since).

Last weekend Robbie was drafted into service to do a hunter demo for some up downers of a very backyard variety, the kids having fun on rescue horses kind of backyard.

So I gave him heart failure by taking him over to the farm where the demo was held and schooling him over the first course he'd jumped in maybe 18 months and about the 5th jump he'd jumped in 7 months. Then the next day I pulled and *gasp* braided him up and put him away with a sleazy. Oh the horrors.

Saturday AM I took him over and finished terrorizing him by braiding his tail. And they we went in the ring.

He went in and acted like he hadn't missed 3 weeks in showing, never mind 3 years. As we closed out our courtesy circle and I gave him the big pat (he loves the big pat), I told the wee munchkins as I went by that he gets the Big Pat so he knows he did a good job... and then they all applauded. I swear, he puffed up even more. :yes: Then after I let all the kids come in the ring in groups of ten and pet on him. swear he was in heaven, I think it might have made the indignities of braiding and mane pulling worth it. ;)

It was a poignant counterpoint to the weekend before when I took the youngster to his first show. (http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5292/5541468132_67725f6b92_b.jpg)

jody jaffe
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:59 PM
to all, thanks for the replies. isn't it fun writing about our dream horses? and isn't that what we horse-crazy women (and men) are about anyway? by the way, my next column is about passion versus addiction, and which is it for us.

anyway, to:
shasamor -- wow, three feet. that's impressive. great that you've found your dream date, too.

lizzie -- i know you were practically vibrating with happiness when you walked away with the tri-color ribbon. not that it's about the win or the ribbon, but the validation is always nice. keep us posted on your dream horse.

asterix -- at least you had the guts to start with. not so far to claw back to. i was circling fences even before i knocked my head. too bad rio's too old. i'd say come get him.

Mo's Mom
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:02 PM
I have one of those very special heart horses right now, and I love hugging on him every day.

This is when he was 5 or 6, and my daughter was 3-4, you can't see me I am right beside her and grandma is taking the picture. He was in love with her then....MB Mo-Dandy - registered 1/2 Arabian....He was always sooooo careful around her, one of the most trustworthy horses with children I have ever know.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v289/mosmom/old%20pictures/jessicamo.jpg

and he still loves her today - this was last fall.....he would jump the world for her.....she is 15, and he is 18. They are going to be going to PC ralley in 6 weeks as a C1 team.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v289/mosmom/YadkinValleyHounds072510/DSCF2343.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v289/mosmom/YadkinValleyHounds072510/DSCF2347.jpg

potterma
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:20 PM
potterma,

thanks for the reply. woody is every rider's dream date.

so sorry to hear about your injury. im sure you know this, but it bears repeating for anyone who might not: that helmet you were wearing is toast, throw it out. also, did your docs tell you to stay off a horse until your brain heals? there's the second concussion phenom that can be deadly. literally.

sorry to be such a downer when it comes to head injuries, but they are serious. when i was younger, i didn't take them seriously. i thought i'd heal and that would be that. not so. the CDC calls people who've hit their heads the walking wounded because they don't know they're wounded.

if you have a moment, check out the column i wrote about head injuries:

http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/three-step-process-beginning-brain-injury-rehabilitation

happy (safe) trails,
jody

I have no idea what the doctors said, I can't remember most of that day. My mom said they said I shouldn't ride again for 2-3 weeks so I'm trying to take that seriously. I'm dying to get on the pony and teach her a lesson though! But I will wait, definitely. I read the column that you suggested, thank you. I just know how lucky I am to have been wearing a helmet and that my injuries were so mild. I had been thinking about buying a new GPA, so I guess I've gotta bite the bullet now :D