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View Full Version : Appropriate 2 horse trailers for half ton truck



altertales
Mar. 27, 2011, 03:38 PM
I am fully aware that it is better to have more towing capacity than just enough, but I am specifically looking for trailer suggestions that a 1/2 ton truck could easily handle. I have been looking through the archives and I haven't found the exact answers I'm looking for, so here goes.

We have a 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 1500. I'm not sure of the exact specs, but it is the shorter bed version and to my knowledge pretty average as far as engine specs. I recently purchased a TB gelding and I'm toying with the idea of looking for a two horse bumper pull trailer. Right now we can't purchase another truck, so we would need something light enough that the 1500 could pull it easily. It would haul one horse most of the time and occasionally two horses. We live in the midwest, so larger hills/mountains aren't a huge issue as it's relatively flat. Hauling distance on average would be 3 hours or less.

Thanks in advance for the suggestions. :D

TheJenners
Mar. 27, 2011, 03:51 PM
Well...any standard two horse would be appropriate, IMHO.

I have a 2H BP with the under tack (small compartment under the mangers). I love this trailer, it's what I grew up with and it took me some time finding it. Everything is slant load these days, or has that big open area for the tack in front of the horses. I have a 2500 HD, but could easily pull it with a half ton. Even a two horse slant, no tack, or a two horse with the small dressing area/tack would be fine for a 1/2 ton, esp if you are only hauling one horse.

PNW AMTS Dealer
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:14 AM
I have that same pickup and pull an aluminum 2 horse slant stock. Very happy with it for the local hauls on flat ground.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/krahm558/Home%20and%20Land/IMG_7877-1.jpg

When I head over the mountain pass I trade pickup with my husband who has the long bed 3/4 ton version.

ThisTooShallPass
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:29 AM
There is NONE. As has been said numerous time over the years on CoTH, it is not the pulling, it is the S-T-O-P-P-I-N-G.

atlatl
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:35 AM
There is NONE. As has been said numerous time over the years on CoTH, it is not the pulling, it is the S-T-O-P-P-I-N-G.

Which is why trailers have electric brakes and you can get weight distributing hitches with anti-sway bars.

Honestly, a 1/2 ton truck can safely pull a 2 horse trailer with no problem. I've been doing it for years as have many many others. It's the length of the W-H-E-E-L B-A-S-E for crying out loud and NOT the payload capacity of the bed.

The absolute most important safety feature is the driver.

GoForAGallop
Mar. 28, 2011, 08:13 AM
Which is why trailers have electric brakes and you can get weight distributing hitches with anti-sway bars.

Honestly, a 1/2 ton truck can safely pull a 2 horse trailer with no problem. I've been doing it for years as have many many others. It's the length of the W-H-E-E-L B-A-S-E for crying out loud and NOT the payload capacity of the bed.

The absolute most important safety feature is the driver.

Yup. A 1/2ton is perfectly safe with a weight distributing hitch and a reasonable trailer. (Ie, no four-horse bumper pulls with dressing room, which yes, I've seen before.) Depending on your exact truck you may have to avoid a trailer with dressing room, or not haul two draft horses, or make sure to keep an eye on how many supplies you pack into it. But it's perfect safe. Not as EASY as hauling with a 3/4 ton, and you absolutely do put more stress on the truck, but it's safe.

mvp
Mar. 28, 2011, 08:24 AM
Which is why trailers have electric brakes and you can get weight distributing hitches with anti-sway bars.

Honestly, a 1/2 ton truck can safely pull a 2 horse trailer with no problem. I've been doing it for years as have many many others. It's the length of the W-H-E-E-L B-A-S-E for crying out loud and NOT the payload capacity of the bed.

The absolute most important safety feature is the driver.

I have a friend who hauled a big draft in a 2H DR BP with a big draft. She used a 1500 Silverado and but always a weight distribution hitch and stabilizer bars. She was pretty happy for hauling and stopping.

If you don't have mountains to contend with and drive like a reasonable person, I don't think you would have problems with stopping or blowing up your transmission. I do think the right hitch and stabilizer bars will be an important component for your combination.

wildlifer
Mar. 28, 2011, 09:38 AM
A simple 2H BP with NO DR, to keep it short. Use stabilizer bars and drive intelligently and don't expect to cross major mountain ranges, and you should be fine.

Pcostx
Mar. 28, 2011, 09:42 AM
For ANY truck and trailer questions I would recommend going to Horse Trailer World.

You can search the forum or post a new question. You will get great information from folks that are professional haulers and KNOW horses, trucks AND trailers.

I've learned a ton there.

Here is the link or you can just search Google/Yahoo, etc:

http://www.horsetrailerworld.com/forum/forum-view.asp?forumid=2

monstrpony
Mar. 28, 2011, 09:48 AM
I'm old enough that I recall a day when everyone who didn't haul with a station wagon used a 1/2 ton PU. We all had standard 2-h, no DR trailers, and we're all still alive today (well, at least none of us died from not being able to stop our trailers ;) ).

I would say that any standard 2-h trailer w/ functioning electric brakes should work; WD hitch a bonus; careful, sensible driver a must, as usual.

babyeventer23
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:25 AM
I have pulled a 2H Adam bumper pull (with DR) with my F150, as well as an older 2H trailer. Both pulled fine with no problems whatsoever.

asterix
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:48 AM
I don't know why this is such a mystery to people.

It's numbers. Pure and simple. Not all half tons are equal. Not all half ton Chevys built in any given year are equal.

My Chevy truck has something like 10 pages in the owner's manual with the towing specs for all the variations in 1500s and 2500s built that year.

Find out EXACTLY what you have -- engine, rear axle ratio, etc. Your truck has a specific towing capacity. Find out what it is.

Then do the math. Not all trailers are equal, either.

Here is a good site that explains how to calculate what you can safely tow (See also the "towing" link on that page, lefthand nav): http://www.equispirit.com/info/faq.htm

For the record, I'm not a "no half ton" zealot. I tow with a half ton Chevy. But my truck can haul nearly 9000 lbs, and I am well below that with my particular configuration. Someone else could have a truck that looks almost identical and be upside down with the trailer and hitch they are using.

Do the math.

atlatl
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:16 AM
I don't know why this is such a mystery to people.

It's numbers. Pure and simple. Not all half tons are equal. Not all half ton Chevys built in any given year are equal.

...

Find out EXACTLY what you have -- engine, rear axle ratio, etc. Your truck has a specific towing capacity. Find out what it is.

Then do the math. Not all trailers are equal, either.

Here is a good site that explains how to calculate what you can safely tow (See also the "towing" link on that page, lefthand nav): http://www.equispirit.com/info/faq.htm

...

Do the math.

It's only a mystery to some :lol:

Thanks for clarifying my original response. I should have mentioned the tow capacity.

altertales
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:18 PM
Thank you everyone for your help. :)

Ibex
Mar. 28, 2011, 06:29 PM
I don't know why this is such a mystery to people.

It's numbers. Pure and simple. Not all half tons are equal. Not all half ton Chevys built in any given year are equal.

My Chevy truck has something like 10 pages in the owner's manual with the towing specs for all the variations in 1500s and 2500s built that year.

Find out EXACTLY what you have -- engine, rear axle ratio, etc. Your truck has a specific towing capacity. Find out what it is.

Then do the math. Not all trailers are equal, either.

Here is a good site that explains how to calculate what you can safely tow (See also the "towing" link on that page, lefthand nav): http://www.equispirit.com/info/faq.htm

For the record, I'm not a "no half ton" zealot. I tow with a half ton Chevy. But my truck can haul nearly 9000 lbs, and I am well below that with my particular configuration. Someone else could have a truck that looks almost identical and be upside down with the trailer and hitch they are using.

Do the math.

What they said. There's a huge difference between my Dodge Ram 1500 with the 8-cyl Hemi, 4WD and tow package and the 6-cyl 2WDs you see advertised as being a great deal on a truck...

joiedevie99
Mar. 28, 2011, 08:17 PM
Find out your engine size, wheel base and rear axle ratio. With those three specs, you can go to http://www.trailerlife.com/output.cfm?id=42175 and download the relevant guide to look up your tow capacity.

Without that, no one can give you any guidance.

Assuming your tow capacity is 7000 lbs.+, you can look at most aluminum two-horse trailers without a dressing room safely.

PonyPenny
Mar. 31, 2011, 09:55 PM
I have a two horse bumper pull aluminum Featherlite Trailer that I pull with a Toyota Tundra. I have weight distribution bars and I make sure my electric trailer brakes are set correctly. I have hauled that trailer all over Southern California. It is mainly freeway driving with a few 6% grades. I have never had any problems with swaying or stopping. I take it out of overdrive when I am on a 6% grade. I love my Featherlite trailer.