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View Full Version : I Can't Believe I Stayed On!



Horseymama
Mar. 26, 2011, 08:39 PM
Check out this video of me almost biting it hard at Thermal...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwWd1LBJw6M

Level 4's, a mare I was riding for someone else, bummer it was the second to the last fence and we were clear up until that point. I rode her a bunch of other times there and she was great, tons of clear rounds. I'm not quite sure why she did that, I know we jumped in a tad strong and she was a little past her arc but I thought it was going to be a little short coming out, but holy ****!

It was supposed to be a 2-stride!

twotrudoc
Mar. 26, 2011, 08:45 PM
Oh good Lord I just yelled so loud I startled the cat! Looks like you might ave a broken nose or black eyes? Did you hit her neck as hard as that looked??

NICE job getting it back together lady!

To the MAX
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:08 PM
Wow! Good job staying on!!

Horseymama
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:15 PM
No, not a mark! I was a little rattled though!

FLeckenAwesome
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:29 PM
Holy schnikes!!! Nice riding!

That gives new meaning to "flyer!"

War Admiral
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:34 PM
Wow, GREAT save! Did she actually break her martingale? I could see *something* flapping loose.

kayteedee
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:44 PM
Love it! Wow. She saw it a bit long, huh? Whew. You looked good saving yourself, though. ;)

-Another horsey mamma

Burgie
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:22 PM
Pretty damn impressive!

Side note: What helmet are you wearing?

horsechick
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:24 PM
Yikes! The woman I used to work for had a GP horse who did that frequently in combos...if you took hold to whoa inside, he thought it meant to leave the ground! Good save lady!

paintmare
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:32 PM
I think the slow motion really makes one realize how much strength it probably took to stay on! lol. Nice save! Naughty mare ;) lol

Bugs-n-Frodo
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:39 PM
Nice ride! I am impressed!

doublesstable
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:45 PM
WOW - Nice save!!!

Looked to me you rode amazing - - naughty hors-ie had her OWN idea!

She said, "What bit and hands asking me to back off?" "I prefer the flyers thank you very much so HANG ON!" - - - :lol:

ivy62
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:47 PM
talk about staying with the horse! great job staying with her...

AdrenalineJunky
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:50 PM
Oh my god, my horse and I crashed so bad after a spot like that. I'm glad you two were ok because I can't say we jumped for about four months after that :s

doublesstable
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:50 PM
Wow, GREAT save! Did she actually break her martingale? I could see *something* flapping loose.

Curb rein.....

chemteach
Mar. 26, 2011, 11:24 PM
Bravo for you!

Horseymama
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:22 AM
doublesstable/War Admiral, yes that was my gag rein, I'm not sure why I dropped that, I think I must have opened my fingers over the jump and it slipped through.

Burgie, I have a JTE Sprint Helmet, there are hard to find in the States, they are from England. It's the only helmet I have ever had that fits me like a glove. Here's the link: http://www.justtogshelmets.co.uk/products/product.php?pid=10019

Mimi La Rue
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:53 AM
Wow that's crazy. :eek: Good save!

Brigit
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:00 AM
WOW! Good riding! What a scopey horse! That's a pretty impressive take off spot!

TheJenners
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:37 AM
Pretty spectacular! I love that mare's jumping style though, and I think that high neck is what saved you! Phew!

kelsey97
Mar. 27, 2011, 10:46 AM
The Horse Gods were with you!!

bizbachfan
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:13 PM
wow thanks for sharing. Great job staying on.

Starhouse
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:48 PM
WOW, incredible riding! Nice job!

kookicat
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:00 PM
Well sat!

HorsesinHaiti
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:05 PM
A bit of boing, boing, BOOOOIIIIICLUNKIIINNNGGGG going on there! Nice save, and nice job getting her mind back in order afterwards!

SnicklefritzG
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:16 PM
Hey, do you have some "sticking" ability you could lend out to the rest of us?

jen-s
Mar. 27, 2011, 03:33 PM
Just looked at your helmet link. It looks identical to my IRH Elite Xtreme. Any clue if the companies are "siblings?" http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productclassid=6898

Regardless, great stick-age! So glad to hear that you weren't hurt because it looked like it could have gotten UGLY fast! :eek::eek::eek:

barnbum81
Mar. 27, 2011, 03:38 PM
gottta love the long spot, good ride :)

ktm2007
Mar. 27, 2011, 04:21 PM
Good Lord that freaked me out watching that. :eek:

Peggy
Mar. 27, 2011, 11:41 PM
Just looked at your helmet link. It looks identical to my IRH Elite Xtreme. Any clue if the companies are "siblings?" http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productclassid=6898

Regardless, great stick-age! So glad to hear that you weren't hurt because it looked like it could have gotten UGLY fast! :eek::eek::eek:I had the same reaction to several of that company's helmets whilst thumbing thru a British catalogue. And, to the OP, brilliant job of staying on.

ridingmomof3
Mar. 28, 2011, 07:08 AM
great job staying on! I would have been in the dirt.

fordtraktor
Mar. 28, 2011, 08:07 AM
Glad you stayed on and the horse stayed up. I'm sure your trainer already told you how incredibly dangerous that was and how lucky you are not to have flipped.

BTDT -- I did the same thing once and was treated to a well-deserved 15 minute lecture gateside about attempted horse murder and how if I didn't get my act together I didn't deserve a horse. After witnessing a couple of horrible accidents later in life, I am so thankful for such set-downs!

ChocoMare
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:09 AM
Well done!!!! :yes: Hope the mare's owner gave you equally as good kudos ;)

goodmorning
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:21 AM
Glad you stayed on and the horse stayed up. I'm sure your trainer already told you how incredibly dangerous that was and how lucky you are not to have flipped.

I think the horse decided to that it was going to ignore some aids...I don't think the one-stride was the rider's goal, based on the posts :eek:

fordtraktor
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:56 AM
I think the horse decided to that it was going to ignore some aids...I don't think the one-stride was the rider's goal, based on the posts :eek:

Yeah, but she let it happen. Same as I did when I was a kid -- I wasn't trying to leave out a stride on purpose but I came into a combination with too much pace and WTH did I think the horse was going to do? No space to fit in another step, too far away to be clear. Disaster either way. Rider error, not horse error.

Nickelodian
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:05 PM
I just watched the video twice. Looks to me like the rider compacted the stride nicely for an easy 2. She was sitting back to compact it more in the middle and the mare took off. I think it is a rare case of horse (not rider) error.

HRF Second Chance
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:10 PM
Holy flying pony batman!!! YOu're my new hero. I would've peed my breeches, started crying like a child and exited the ring to never return. But not you! You got yourself together and kept on trucking.

You go girl!

fordtraktor
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:20 PM
I just watched the video twice. Looks to me like the rider compacted the stride nicely for an easy 2. She was sitting back to compact it more in the middle and the mare took off. I think it is a rare case of horse (not rider) error.

Hmm, to me it seems like horse is getting stronger/lengthening every stride for the last 5 to the first element.

Great save by OP, which is clearly a wonderful rider. Love the horse.

Calvincrowe
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:33 PM
Fordtraktor--she is a trainer, and her husband is one, too. Good save! Naughty mare--but super athletic, because she saved herself, too!! Scary to watch, as we've all made dumb errors or had a horse who ignored us/made a error in judgment and we ended up in the dirt. I've sat out a year with an injury due to me ignoring my saint's "uh, nope, too long here, mom", warning.:no:

SnicklefritzG
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:52 PM
I just watched the video twice. Looks to me like the rider compacted the stride nicely for an easy 2. She was sitting back to compact it more in the middle and the mare took off. I think it is a rare case of horse (not rider) error.

I agree. It looked like the OP was trying to hold the horse back but it decided to go anyway.

Kudos to both of them for making it through. The rider did a great job of staying on. While I would not want to go through that myself, I think the horse was game for trying to make the best of a bad situation and for doing another jump nicely before leaving the ring.

fordtraktor
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:53 PM
She's a lovely rider, everyone makes mistakes sometimes.

I really only posted because there were a lot of "good riding!" posts on a thread with a serious safety issue, with nobody giving the "that's really dangerous" speech. Somebody had to say it.

If we don't flag it when trainers make these mistakes, the lower-level jumper peeps think it's OK to do them too, or blame the horse when they happen. JMO.

barnbum81
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:07 PM
She's a lovely rider, everyone makes mistakes sometimes.

I really only posted because there were a lot of "good riding!" posts on a thread with a serious safety issue, with nobody giving the "that's really dangerous" speech. Somebody had to say it.

If we don't flag it when trainers make these mistakes, the lower-level jumper peeps think it's OK to do them too, or blame the horse when they happen. JMO.

seriously? getting on a horse period is a safety issue. Are you implying that she just let the horse barrel through the jump on purpose? I am confused. Maybe I'm too touchy and need to stay away from COTH today........anyway as I said before, good ride, way to get back up and finish your course

fordtraktor
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:21 PM
Of course I'm not, geez. IMO she had too much pace and should have taken a pull coming in instead of letting the horse get stronger, but she didn't. It was a MISTAKE. No big deal, I make them all the time. But leaving a stride out in a combination is a big mistake, and my trainer reamed me a new one the one time I made it, even though I didn't do it "on purpose" but by accident the same as this person did, my horse got a little strong and I didn't do enough about it.

But I should have. Not doing anything about it could have had serious repurcussions for my horse. It's about rider accountability. My trainer made sure I knew I was responsible for my horse's safety, and I've never forgotten that my horse's safety is ultimately my responsibility.

Sorry, I didn't realize this person is a trainer and therefore incapable of making errors, must be the horse's fault.

Showhtr
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:46 PM
Wow that was pretty scary to watch, can't imagine how it felt riding that.. but usually things seem to happen really fast. Great job staying on. Did you loose your left stirrup? Looks like it stayed on..

I like to look at things as a learning experience. Guess you will now be super careful about not leaving out a stride or taking a long distance.

Looks like your horse did a nice job trying to help you out and not having an attitude about it. She didn't buck or look to angry about it, which def helps.

Backstage
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:47 PM
I just watched the video twice. Looks to me like the rider compacted the stride nicely for an easy 2. She was sitting back to compact it more in the middle and the mare took off. I think it is a rare case of horse (not rider) error.

I don't think that the two are mutually exclusive. The OP is clearly a good rider, so I don't want to take away from that. That said, since we are discussing it, when I first watched the video, I did not like the shape of that canter coming into the first fence but was still surprised by the outcome. I doubt the OP would make the same riding decisions a second time around. The horse may have made a poor judgment call, but the rider allowed it to happen.

Gestalt
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:49 PM
Really good job sticking to the saddle! But I, too, think the rider let the horse take the jump. And I didn't like the rough treatment to halt her, the mare seems to be quite sensitive to the riders strong hands.

Calhoun
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:10 PM
New pair of underwear alert . . . wow, you were lucky and so brave to jump another fence. Pat yourself on the back.

callie208
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:34 PM
I agree, way to pull it together and finish the course. Not every rider can be that well poised after a surprise like that!

Horseymama
Mar. 28, 2011, 06:40 PM
Thanks for everyone's kind words! Yes I am fully aware that I rode in a little strong, as I put in my original post, but I actually wanted to do a short two, as it was a bending 7 after that and I didn't want to jump too fast across the oxer and get down it too early. However she had another idea! You can't always arrive perfectly, although I always try, every horse is different. I didn't know this mare at all, but after that, I tried really hard to get her to a shorter spot at the in and outs because obviously she jumps a little far into them.

I accept full responsibility as I am the rider and I do believe in that. I don't have a trainer, but I do have a coach, and although he wasn't there that day I showed him the video and he was surprised that she took off there, too. I really do know how lucky I am!

Oh and I stopped her a little quick because she was bolting and my left stirrup leather was hooked on my saddle somehow and I had dropped my gag rein so I wasn't going to take any chances for the sake of being smooth!

NeedsAdvil
Mar. 28, 2011, 06:59 PM
I think you did a great job! I had a horse that jumped very similar to her, he landed SO far on the opposite side of a jump that combinations had to be ridden absolutely perfectly or we would take a flyer like that. One of the most complex horses I've ever ridden, and also one of the most athletic. I also never fell off of him, somehow he always kept me up on top. Glad to see you are okay!

Come Shine
Mar. 28, 2011, 07:06 PM
Page 99 in Winning with Frank Chapot.

"This photograph is an example of what I call a safety seat. This horse is not going to make it over the back rail of the oxer. I have not interfered with her mouth, nor am I sitting on her back. I am trying to give the horse a chance to jump the fence, but if she crashes, I am in a good position not to get hurt."

Rarely is anything ever perfect. You did a good job in a tough situation.

tidy rabbit
Mar. 28, 2011, 08:19 PM
Watching the slo-mo it's pretty clear that you checked her at what should have been the up beat of stride two and she just freeking took off.

I have one who spooks at the sound of footing hitting the jumps which can make for some very interesting related distances.

GreystoneKC
Mar. 28, 2011, 09:52 PM
That startled me as I expected it to be at the end of the video from your explanation! I think you did a great job handling that from front to back and it was obviously a freak accident. You did a stellar job of trying to stay off of her mouth! I can't even comprehend how someone can comment that you "let" her leave from there - I'm sure that was totally your intention... ;)

DMK
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:40 AM
Horseymama, I can't believe you stayed on either (uh, and you are forgiven for being abrupt wit hyour stop on the backside - almost losing your seat, being totally discombobulated and having a potentially panicked horse underneath you calls for urgent action - as does, no doubt, the adrenaline coursing through you and the horse!)

And for all those bashing fordtraktor, I think there's an element of truth. Or rather I would say, I bet the OP would in no way ride that combination with that horse the same way if given a do over. I'm guessing she would choose "life" and would adapt her ride accordingly. :lol: We all make mistakes and most of us try to learn from them. What's the big deal about that?

Now what would be funny is showing the video of the do over. My guess is there would b a strong emphasis on Non Negotiable Equine Compliance. And then the OP could get drug over the coals for being too strong and overriding, and omigod, I (internet expert) could get the job done so much better (as soon as I can actually string more than 2 fences together) yadda yadda yadda. The interweb tubz, gotta love 'em. :D

fordtraktor
Mar. 29, 2011, 09:49 AM
OP, I think your response was extremely classy. While the horse did something unexpected, you now have a great plan for avoiding it happening again the in the future and have learned how the horse needs to be ridden to avoid the problem. That is exactly the type of mindful riding we should all aspire to.

It is much more meaningful to analyze what went wrong in situations like this, and what one can do to fix it going forward, than to just classify it as a freak accident, ooh and aah and repeat it again because we haven't thought it through.

The horse I did this with had the same plan -- we always had to get in tight to the base of the first element on a bouncy canter into a combination b/c he had a big, big stride and would eat up the distance, even a longish distance. A tight distance and we had to get in tight to the base, as well as sit up and whoa between each element or he'd have rails at the end of the triple, for example.

hntrjmprpro45
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:13 AM
I'm kind of surprised at how many people suggest riding even deeper to the base of the first element. With horses like this, I actually prefer backing them off the base a little so they land a little closer and have more room within the line. I forgot which jumper rider taught me that (Candace King maybe? Darn memory), but it has been really helpful with fussy or sensitive horses that prefer smoother rides. That's just my opinion though.

fordtraktor
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:28 AM
I was always taught that you want a bouncy, collected canter to the base to get a nice round jump over the first, to land with your canter in a shape prepared to give you two nice bouncy strides to the next element and a good takeoff with impulsion to that as well. When a horse jumps from the base, they tend to jump up and round, and land down and round maintaining that trajectory.

If you get the longer spot to the first, you tend to get a flatter jump and actually end up landing further away b/c of the trajectory of the fence -- less up and down/round and more of the classic "flyer" -- triangle shape to the jump. Not where you want to be with this kind of horse, IMO because you will be too far in and your canter is going to be lengthening, not collecting, unless you make major adjustments which you don't have time for in a combination.

hntrjmprpro45
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:13 PM
I was always taught that you want a bouncy, collected canter to the base to get a nice round jump over the first, to land with your canter in a shape prepared to give you two nice bouncy strides to the next element and a good takeoff with impulsion to that as well. When a horse jumps from the base, they tend to jump up and round, and land down and round maintaining that trajectory.

If you get the longer spot to the first, you tend to get a flatter jump and actually end up landing further away b/c of the trajectory of the fence -- less up and down/round and more of the classic "flyer" -- triangle shape to the jump. Not where you want to be with this kind of horse, IMO because you will be too far in and your canter is going to be lengthening, not collecting, unless you make major adjustments which you don't have time for in a combination.

I wasn't suggesting going for a "flyer", but rather coming in collected, backing the horse off the base slightly (key word slightly) so that you land closer to the base on the other side. By doing this you don't change the shape of the jump much so you will still land in a good canter. In my opinion, the take off stride is more of an indicator of how flat/round the jump will be rather than the distance itself.

Altering the take off and landing is a little more challenging but is also quite a bit more sophisticated and can lead to a smoother round. You can practice this basic concept over ground poles. Canter into a line fairly collected. If you hit a longer spot on the "take off" then you'll land closer to the pole on the landing and will have more room in the line. Likewise, if you canter in with the same collected canter but ride to the base you will land farther from the pole and have less room in the line. Things change a little when you throw jumps in the picture but the basics will remain true. That's why I tell my students that if your horse cuts down on the back side of the first jump, you better boogy down the line unless you want to end up with a really long spot on the second fence.

Another good example to watch is the six bar competition, watch how their distance dictates where they land in the line and how it effects the next jump. Too deep to the first and they will generally get closer and closer to the base of the following jumps even though they are still on a collected canter. Of course as each jump gets bigger they will naturally land slightly further out but messing up that first distance will make it that much harder to get through.

fordtraktor
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:19 PM
I don't disagree with you, hunterjumperpro45, if I had a horse that liked that ride, my last few horses have jumped most brilliantly being ridden to the base though. I have had a few that liked a little more space though, for sure -- I'd say if you are good enough to have that level of detail then you can adjust to what works best for the horse.

Now if I could only ride well enough to do any of this again....sigh. My eye is so rusty I couldn't jump my way out of a paper box these days, I just try not to kill myself or my horse over crossrails. Yesterday I took a LOFFLY flyer over a pole on the ground, it made the OP's flyer look like a chip. Do as I say, not as I do!