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Brian
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:37 AM
What DIY projects would like to do if you had the time, knowledge, and right tools around the barn or farm?

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:50 AM
Just curious, but that is an odd question from a poster that signed on in 2004 and this is a second post?;)

We do it all, build our own barns, used wood before, metal today for the barn and stalls, that are portable.
Metal today is a very accessible material and with modern tools easy to fabricate.

If you don't know how to weld, there are classes in most high schools and colleges you can take and you can learn in a few hours how to handle all equipment safely.

If using wood today, wood quality is poor, you have to buy it where you can send the scrappy lumber back, are not stuck with the whole delivery load.

That is such an open ended question, it is hard to know where to start to answer.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:58 AM
Gee bluey...maybe he was shy to post because of snarky people on this forum? I mean seriously...his question is not exactly stupid or anything. Lots of people lurk for a long time before joining in.

To the OP: I think we've done about everything on this farm besides install the metal roof on our barn. We can frame, side, lay concrete, build fence (and have put miles in ourselves) and any number of small little jobs. We are hoping to finally put in underground water lines this year and quit relying on above ground hoses. Yup, even in winter, I've had to water a 26 acre farm that way. Most winters in our typically mild region are not that bad but the last two were a PITA as cold as it's been.

If we don't own the equipment, quite often it can be rented and you still save money over paying someone. A few years ago at our old farm, we rented a bobcat for a weekend. That thing was so much fun! ;-)

shawneeAcres
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:04 AM
I want to concrete in and put a drain for our grooming stall, without calling in a concrete truck ($$$$!) We have on the "todo" list: new arena, primarily for dressage, "mini" cross country course, one field needs cross fencing, more runins, eventually more stalls/barn. Most of these projects we will do ourselves, we've had to learn as we go, alot I already knew having run a LOT of farms, my DH not so much! But, other than the shell for the barn we have done almost everything on our farm ourselves ,did have someone lay the water lines fron the well and pu in frost free spigots, of course we have already had to replace two of those due to poor installion and we did that ourselves!

Brian
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:19 AM
Just curious, but that is an odd question from a poster that signed on in 2004 and this is a second post?;)

We do it all, build our own barns, used wood before, metal today for the barn and stalls, that are portable.
Metal today is a very accessible material and with modern tools easy to fabricate.

If you don't know how to weld, there are classes in most high schools and colleges you can take and you can learn in a few hours how to handle all equipment safely.

If using wood today, wood quality is poor, you have to buy it where you can send the scrappy lumber back, are not stuck with the whole delivery load.

That is such an open ended question, it is hard to know where to start to answer.

Fair question. I consider myself to be a "member" more than a "poster" on this forum. Sorry, but this isn't a forum I regularly visit. (Mainly because I couldn't remember my log in information.) There are a couple of other (local or regional) forums I belong to, and will post on topics when I feel I can contribute helpful information.

The topic of DIY projects around the farm came up recently. I asked the same question on those forums as well. I thought I would ask the question in a forum that had more of a national scope of members.

While the list of projects could be almost endless, it really wasn't meant to be an open ended question. My wife has a constant list of "Honey Do's" for me. Most of which include designing, fabricating, welding, building, and or repairing. I already know how to do most of these things. I was just curious as to how many others were DIY'er's or wanted to be more of DIY'er.

Brian

chai
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:27 AM
There are so many projects I wish I could do on my own. We have a small cottage that I would love to be able to renovate. Cost from the electrician just to put in outlets was $5,000. I have stripped off the old cheezy paneling and removed the old insulation but now I'm stuck. I wish there was an electrician in my family or I dared to tackle that one.
I have found that on the farm, a lot of the DIY projects are things that just have to get done, like fence repair, sinking a new fence line, reshingling (one of my favorite projects), putting in a brick walkway, re-claying stalls, painting the barn, and basic carpentry/repair in the barn because horses are such destructos.

Interesting question, Brian. I didn't realize how much I've done on my farm until I really thought about it.

deckchick
Mar. 26, 2011, 09:36 AM
I moved back to our family farm in 2006. There was nothing here but a 2 sided pole barn. I/we (family members) have done everything ourselves except putting electricity in the barn. Last fall we finally have water and power!

I have done tons of fencing, roofing, building, grading, heck you name it, I've done it!

Small/broke farmers have no choice but to become a Jill-of-all-trades it seems!

ayrabz
Mar. 26, 2011, 10:55 AM
Brian...I think you answered that with a lot of class. Lots could have taken that as snarky and responded as such.

In re: DIY: I know there are SO many things I'd like to just get done myself, vs. waiting on contractors to bid, trying to evaluate those bids, to know what is/isn't being 'taken', and then (!!) waiting on their ever changeing schedules (!!) to ever get it all finished. S I G H.

One thing: I have come here, and asked questions ABOUT 'to do jobs' that, has really helped with the given suggestions, no matter if I 'try it myself' or contract it out.

I'd be doing these jobs 'alone' and without many needed power tools, and a LOT of needed experience/knowledge. So...for me, sometimes just the learning, the understanding of HOW I want WHAT done, does help...even in the hireing!

:)

MeghanDACVA
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:04 PM
Our next, not yet started, project is also a concrete job. Hubby is trying to get enough concrete projects lined up to make it worth a truck bringing a whole load out.

And we, like the others here, do most all of our own projects. Wiring, plumbing, carpentry, dirt work, welding, etc. When we built the place we are on now we actually had a company come up the buildings up. MISTAKE!! So many things done "wrong", and delays. Had a 3rd building built a few years ago and that is the only one that was done correctly. Different company.

Right now the project at hand is trimming branches. Dont' ask me why but it is.

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:13 PM
Fair question. I consider myself to be a "member" more than a "poster" on this forum. Sorry, but this isn't a forum I regularly visit. (Mainly because I couldn't remember my log in information.) There are a couple of other (local or regional) forums I belong to, and will post on topics when I feel I can contribute helpful information.

The topic of DIY projects around the farm came up recently. I asked the same question on those forums as well. I thought I would ask the question in a forum that had more of a national scope of members.

While the list of projects could be almost endless, it really wasn't meant to be an open ended question. My wife has a constant list of "Honey Do's" for me. Most of which include designing, fabricating, welding, building, and or repairing. I already know how to do most of these things. I was just curious as to how many others were DIY'er's or wanted to be more of DIY'er.

Brian

Sorry if my question sounded "snarky", I didn't mean it that way.:confused:
The poster that pointed to that has a past history of not liking my responses on principle. I do understand why she would take any I say wrong.;)

I would say that most everyone that does any work has to tackle DIY proyects and in fact, that is part of the fun of having a farm, that you do get to do all that also, I think.:cool:

With today's broad information and technology for DIY proyects, they are a snap any more.
I love best the hydraulic augers, that keep on digging, unlike the old PTO ones, that were useless for any but the softest ground, not worth the aggavation of trying to use them.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:27 PM
The poster that pointed to that has a past history of not liking my responses on principle. I do understand why she would take any I say wrong.;)



No not on principle (however that's not a bad thought) but I did think you were quite rude to him and I would have said that same thing to anyone else actually. Maybe it's the little winky icon you like to use so much:rolleyes: but I was obviously not the only one who felt your comment could have been taken as snarky.

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:38 PM
No not on principle (however that's not a bad thought) but I did think you were quite rude to him and I would have said that same thing to anyone else actually. Maybe it's the little winky icon you like to use so much:rolleyes: but I was obviously not the only one who felt your comment could have been taken as snarky.


I think I already apologized to the poster in question, are you asking I apologize to you also?:p

I do think that noting that this was a strange post from a stranger was not exactly being snarky, but in case it was, I apologized, I sure don't want to come across as such.:no:

I have a crew here finishing 4+ miles of fences today, I hope, so am kind of busy, coming and going, with little time.

I wanted to say, enjoy that you can DIY while you can, because there will be times where you will be in the injured reserve list, as I am now.:(
It is stressful to be relegated to a mere supervising position, when you really would like to be there having fun with the DIY work, especially on as beautiful a spring day as we have today.:cool:

seabreeze
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:47 PM
If I had the knowledge and the equipment? (Well, the equipment is the thing...I can learn to do anything)

Grading and resurfacing the gravel driveway
Adding a lean-to/porch over one end of my barn over the aisle
Adding a couple of outdoor lights for night riding
Electrical work (I guess that's more knowledge than equipment)
Creating a place to compost manure

Boy, a tractor sure would be nice :cool:

MunchkinsMom
Mar. 26, 2011, 04:11 PM
Hahaha, I'm going out to buy a cordless circular saw tonight, because I was doing fence repairs and all the new boards are about 6 inches too long, and lugging that 16 foot board up to the house to cut it sucked! After the 3rd one, I said forget it, I'm taking a trip to town and stimulating the economy again.

My issue is mostly time and not enough helpers.

On my wish list:

Overhangs over the doorways on my center aisle barn for shade and rain protection.

Barn doors for that same barn.

Would love to replace the barn siding, but bare minimum it needs painting.

My husband is big on DIY, and is in the process of completely remodeling the main bathroom in the house, he completely gutted it, moved the plumbing (no easy task on a concrete slab house in Florida). His philosophy is learn as you go, and he does it pretty well.

jump4me
Mar. 26, 2011, 04:16 PM
Right now, I'm in the process of finding a place to build a wash "stall"- not particularly complicated, just a PITA to get my parents to agree on where I can or cannot put it :lol: as it has to be near enough to their house for the hot water, not on the septic tank, and preferably somewhat sheltered, because its always windy and I don't want the beasts to freeze on one side while I'm bathing the other :lol:

Otherwise, my dad and I, with help from family/friends/neighbors pretty much do/did everything ourselves.

Brian
Mar. 26, 2011, 04:20 PM
Wow, is there a "time out" icon anywhere? I didn't start this thread to create a lot of drama. Bluey, apology accepted. Daydream & Others, Thanks for your support.

I guess I should have also asked what DIY projects have you done?

With me for instance, some of the projects I've done around our farm are: built a 16x16 lean to, built 3 - 60x80 paddocks with 4 board fencing, built & welded from scratch 10 of our 18 stalls, a 200 gallon water cart (actually two of them, the first was 100 gallon), ran underground electric for outlets by the paddocks, closed in a 96' open sided building with 4 - 16' sliding doors, built wooden saddle racks for the tack room, installed a flush toilet in the barn, wired and installed lights in the indoor, built a desk for the tack room, made our bed (stall front design), made horse shoe bridle hooks, made a horse shoe towel rack for bathroom, and winter blanket storage racks to name a few.

There are other things I would like to learn "how to do", such as welding aluminum. I just had a shop built. I wanted to do it myself, but was afraid of spending thousands of dollars on materials and having the finished building be "out of square" or not "look right." I do plan on doing the electrical, but will probably need some help with everything so it's done correctly.

I'm quite sure my wife has a few other projects for me to work on as well. She's probably waiting for me to get caught up on my "honey do" list.

carolprudm
Mar. 26, 2011, 04:34 PM
Water (with auto waterers of course)to both barns and power to the one that doesn't have it.

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2011, 05:10 PM
---" ... made our bed (stall front design) ... "---

Now for that one we could use a picture, please?:yes:

Daydream Believer
Mar. 26, 2011, 05:12 PM
I think I already apologized to the poster in question, are you asking I apologize to you also?:p


No, certainly not... but I was just explaining why I posted as I did when you accused me of picking on you in particular..or on principal as you put it.

Bluey
Mar. 26, 2011, 05:32 PM
A neighbor and us built this shed addition to the old Quanset barn, the first 30' a few years ago, the last 30' the past two years:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-071665.jpg?t=1301174589

This was going to be our quarantine barn.
We intend to build a big barn, just not right now and this is as much as we need for the moment.

We already have bids for the material for the big barn, will rent the telehandlers to put it up, as our tractor doesn't go that high.
Today those buildings come pre-engineered, practically as a bolt yourself kit, although we would still add welded reinforcements to the roof, as we did with the shed part.
We could fabricate our own post and rafters, we are going 120' clear span with it, following the engineering plans, but we would have some waste, so it is a washout on them to buy them pre-made and ready to bolt.

The horse market is not good enough right now to be building large barns, many are cutting down on their horse activities around here.

Planning and building is fun, is it, although it does cut into riding time, if you are very busy training.:yes:

One question, our insurance won't accept a building where the electrical work is not done by a licensed electrician.
How do those that do their own electrical work get around that?

Chall
Mar. 26, 2011, 06:58 PM
I *think* you can do your own electrical work but you must have a licensed electrician inspect & approve it (and pay him). Not worth it doing yourself, especially if you are scared of dealing with it (like me).

Brian
Mar. 27, 2011, 09:50 AM
---" ... made our bed (stall front design) ... "---

Now for that one we could use a picture, please?:yes:

When we remodeled a few things in the house, my wife wanted a new bedroom set. She couldn't find a bed frame she liked (in our price range). She wanted something kind of country, yet simple. Here's a couple of pictures of what I came up with. The bed is nothing fancy, but very solid with 4x4 and 2x6 lumber. I think I spent somewhere around $125 total in materials.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed2.jpg


Here's a picture of the towel rack for the bathroom. Her idea again. Cost of materials was about $12.00.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/towelrack2.jpg

ayrabz
Mar. 27, 2011, 10:07 AM
Careful, Brian!!!!!!!!!!!
That bed is soooo cool...(gawd, I hate it when I talk like a 12 yr old) Your wife may be quite distressed with all of your new found ooohing and ahhing internet horsewomen friends!!!)

REALLY neat bed idea!

Bluey
Mar. 27, 2011, 10:23 AM
When we remodeled a few things in the house, my wife wanted a new bedroom set. She couldn't find a bed frame she liked (in our price range). She wanted something kind of country, yet simple. Here's a couple of pictures of what I came up with. The bed is nothing fancy, but very solid with 4x4 and 2x6 lumber. I think I spent somewhere around $125 total in materials.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed2.jpg


Here's a picture of the towel rack for the bathroom. Her idea again. Cost of materials was about $12.00.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/towelrack2.jpg

Now, that all is beautiful!:eek:

Never seen a bed like that or such a towel rack.

I bet someone will now copy that and make it commercially, you may want to patent the designs if you mind.

We don't make pretty things, just what we need, barns, stalls, gates is about all we take the time to build.

cowgirljenn
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:07 PM
My current DIY project is a 36 x 48 barn - 7 stalls, tack room, center aisle. It has all been DH and I except for about 3 days my dad helped. It has been a 1 1/2 year long project. There were MANY weather delays and we can only work on the weekends. We finished the tack room this weekend and I now have 5 stalls ready to go. I need to finish the other 2 stalls, finish leveling the barn aisle (it is dirt/sand), paint, and do some small things. We may eventually finish this one..

Our next project is to build a shed for our pool pump and filter. That should go more quickly. Then we have some fencing to fix (thanks to last year's tornado), a run in shed to reroof (thanks to last year's tornado) and some new fencing to put up.

I think we're insane - but we don't have the $$ to pay someone else and we can learn to do anything we need/want to do.

BEARCAT
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:39 PM
Hog Panel Hay Shed
http://www.rochestertrailriders.com/2010/12/diy-how-to-build-a-horse-run-in-shed-for-under-300/

I just finished one of these for my hay and I LOVE IT!!
Was super cheap - I made it with T-posts, 2 hog panels and 2 plywood boards we had laying around, so so far it was "free" so to speak. Will add another hog panel when we can get one (1 hour drive.)
Was super easy to do (I did most of it myself, hubby helped with putting on the tarp and securing it.)
I already had a super heavy duty tarp (a recycled billboard) which was extremly heavy and hard to crawl under to get a bale of hay, so this is NICE!

Daydream Believer
Mar. 27, 2011, 03:00 PM
Hog Panel Hay Shed
http://www.rochestertrailriders.com/2010/12/diy-how-to-build-a-horse-run-in-shed-for-under-300/

I just finished one of these for my hay and I LOVE IT!!
Was super cheap - I made it with T-posts, 2 hog panels and 2 plywood boards we had laying around, so so far it was "free" so to speak. Will add another hog panel when we can get one (1 hour drive.)
Was super easy to do (I did most of it myself, hubby helped with putting on the tarp and securing it.)
I already had a super heavy duty tarp (a recycled billboard) which was extremly heavy and hard to crawl under to get a bale of hay, so this is NICE!

Nice shed! I am going to use a similar design for a movable broiler shelter. You can also get hoop house kits and do something simiar from CLEARSPAN which is what we did with our hen coop. Your version is way less expensive though.

One of the seed companies I know of (Johnny's seeds) has a pipe bender where you can made metal hoop frames from chain link fence poles. They even have special clamps to hold the covers on really tight too that any greenhouse or cold frame supplier has in stock.

Brian, I need to commission some bed frames from you! Very very nice!

goeslikestink
Mar. 27, 2011, 05:15 PM
Fair question. I consider myself to be a "member" more than a "poster" on this forum. Sorry, but this isn't a forum I regularly visit. (Mainly because I couldn't remember my log in information.) There are a couple of other (local or regional) forums I belong to, and will post on topics when I feel I can contribute helpful information.

The topic of DIY projects around the farm came up recently. I asked the same question on those forums as well. I thought I would ask the question in a forum that had more of a national scope of members.

While the list of projects could be almost endless, it really wasn't meant to be an open ended question. My wife has a constant list of "Honey Do's" for me. Most of which include designing, fabricating, welding, building, and or repairing. I already know how to do most of these things. I was just curious as to how many others were DIY'er's or wanted to be more of DIY'er.

Brian

mate, round my yard its all diy lol and done by me and i is a woman hbby isnt horsey and horses dont live at home, they are on what was a dirty great big field, over 40 yrs i have transformed to house 12 horses in total, 3 seperate paddocks, standing room, for farriers inside also feed room which is all in the big shed and storage area hosuing 3 horses with a 4 box if need it can house the large horses up 18.hhs and more n the little shed houses houses upto 17hhs
and houses upto 7 ponies, plus storage

all the fields have post and rial as in 8ft with 4 rails 3/4 of the way round the boundary got to 1/4 more to make it complete not a weld insite all done by etierh sheet metal sections or re cycled wood hubby i will give creidt where due
did all fitments for all electrics - have proper mains electric and water supply
where as i didnt have either when i took it over stil have a few bits and bobs to do but i have time when i am up there i am always bissy and iride and hold a normal job and also wife and mother

so girls can be just as good as blokes with a sledge hammer ,and tools lol

MarionHorse
Mar. 27, 2011, 06:33 PM
When we remodeled a few things in the house, my wife wanted a new bedroom set. She couldn't find a bed frame she liked (in our price range). She wanted something kind of country, yet simple. Here's a couple of pictures of what I came up with. The bed is nothing fancy, but very solid with 4x4 and 2x6 lumber. I think I spent somewhere around $125 total in materials.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed2.jpg


Here's a picture of the towel rack for the bathroom. Her idea again. Cost of materials was about $12.00.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/towelrack2.jpg

Brian, I love love love your designs! When I'm lucky enough to have saved up enough money to get my own place (after college of course), I would love to create my own horse-minded decor. I love the idea of the bed/stall front type thing, though I'm more of a fan of sleigh beds. Perhaps one day I'll DIY my own sleigh bed :) As far as the towel bar goes: I am in love with horse-shoe decor, but a lot of it seems super cheesy. Your towel bar is very much an exception! Very well done! :)

Sorry, no DIY things to contribute to this post, just HAD to comment on your wonderful designs! :)

Fairview Horse Center
Mar. 27, 2011, 07:07 PM
The bed is nothing fancy, but very solid with 4x4 and 2x6 lumber. I think I spent somewhere around $125 total in materials.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/kk280/smartfeeds/bed2.jpg

Oh, my! I LOVE it!

MeghanDACVA
Mar. 27, 2011, 07:47 PM
I want to concrete in and put a drain for our grooming stall, without calling in a concrete truck ($$$$!) We have on the "todo" list: new arena, primarily for dressage, "mini" cross country course, one field needs cross fencing, more runins, eventually more stalls/barn. Most of these projects we will do ourselves, we've had to learn as we go, alot I already knew having run a LOT of farms, my DH not so much! But, other than the shell for the barn we have done almost everything on our farm ourselves ,did have someone lay the water lines fron the well and pu in frost free spigots, of course we have already had to replace two of those due to poor installion and we did that ourselves!

For the concrete, start "accumulating" projects for concrete. Then find out what minimum number of yards your concrete plant will bring without a haul fee. If you have enough projects it will pay for itself. That is what we are doing. Chuck has a list of concrete "needs" and almost up to a full truck!

As for tools and equipment, my hubby is a horder!! I think we have triplicates of almost every common tool known to man. And prob have at least one of almost anything else. Oh, and...3 tractors, a backhoe, 4 mowers, 3 generators, 3 welders....

Brian
Mar. 28, 2011, 10:58 AM
Careful, Brian!!!!!!!!!!!
That bed is soooo cool...(gawd, I hate it when I talk like a 12 yr old) Your wife may be quite distressed with all of your new found ooohing and ahhing internet horsewomen friends!!!)

REALLY neat bed idea!

LOL. Thanks. I also made a bed for our daughter that I incorporated an old rusty piece of barbed wire from the farm into the headboard. I routed a wide, deep groove across the top for a place to put the barbed wire. Then, I poured a clear epoxy into the groove for a 3D effect and to hold everything in place. It turned out looking pretty good as well.

Again, my wife's idea to use the barbed wire. She's the creative one. She'll give me the basics of what she wants, and I'll try to come up with the end product.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 28, 2011, 11:33 AM
We MUST have a picture of the Barbed Wire headboard! That sounds so cool! I wish I was crafty with wood. I can do rougher work like framing and building stall doors, chicken coops, etc... but I'm not good at trim quality work. We are remodeling our house (on the farm) and we hope to make our own custom cabinets. My husband is way better at that sort of thing than I am.

buck22
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:44 PM
if I had the time, knowledge and tools I'd like to try my hand at a french drain.

Trevelyan96
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:17 PM
Our current to do list:

Add an equipment shed off the back of the barn.
Fence in the final wooded 1/2 acre.
Replace/Repair barn doors.
Tree removal - lots of pines that need to come out.
Hot wire on the outer perimiter of the fence - we have 3 board fencing and I'm tired of them chewing on the fence and crapping on the hay.
Re-finish my feed/tack room so its insulated and heated.

And of course there's always fence repairs. DH is supposed to pick up more boards at the mill today.

Pasture maintenance - always high on the list for small acreage.

cyndi
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:30 PM
We just finished a project I've wanted to do for the last 8 years. I rented a Ditch Witch with rear-mount trencher and put in 1,000 feet of waterline so I can (finally!!) divide my ten-acre field into 3 paddocks. I am the 'heavy equipment operator' in my family. LOL! My husband is a computer guy and has no interest in such things.

If you've thought about doing this - it wasn't that hard! Now, we do not have rocks, and only had to go a short distance between trees. There was a short learning curve to operating the Ditch Witch. Basically, the guy who unloaded it showed me the levers and I pretty much figured everything else out.

Including delivery, it cost $520 to rent for a day. But we got it on Friday so had the use of it all weekend. The rental covered 8 hours - in 8 hours we could have dug a few miles of trench! The trenching was the EASIEST part. I am glad I rented the 'ride on' model. We had some crushed concrete to go through right at the barn, and I don't think the walk-behind model would have been nearly as easy. (Or as fun!) WELL worth the money.

It took us half a day on Friday, and a solid ten hours Sat/Sun to complete the project. That included making two trips to Home Depot to get the PVC pipe since it was awkward to carry in the truck. (20' sections - strapped so that it basically covered our entire truck, from nose to tail!) I also strongly suggest you get the 20' sections if you're doing any distance at all.

We have not put faucets in yet - we just buried everything (The Ditch Witch has a small blade on the front that tilts at angles for filling it back in!). When I get the electric fencing up - the next project!- then we'll just dig up the capped ends and install the faucets.

Plumbing is easy - I plumbed my old barn by myself, including installing auto waterers, and at this one, I ran hot water from the sink in the barn out to the wash rack at the back.

katarine
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:20 PM
I want to write the check when it's done. I'm utterly tapped out of DIY energy.

chai
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:33 PM
Brian, that bedframe is gorgeous and the towel rack is something I would buy in a catalog. Very cool.
Bearcat, you are a genius. I want one of those.

Buck, I teach TR at a farm that installed a French Drain last year along the riding ring. In previous years, the ring would wash out whenever it rained hard. The French Drain works so well, the footing has been useable almost all winter and it hasn't flooded once.